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  • 200020002553951800800824974400400321928PublicAssets/6520Here, a human HeLa cell (a type of immortal cell line used in laboratory experiments) is undergoing cell division. They come from cervical cancer cells that were obtained in 1951 from Henrietta Lacks, a patient at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. The final stage of division, called cytokinesis, occurs after the genomes—shown in yellow—have split into two new daughter cells. The myosin II is a motor protein shown in blue, and the actin filaments, which are types of protein that support cell structure, are shown in red. Read more about <a href="https://directorsblog.nih.gov/2013/08/07/hela-cells-a-new-chapter-in-an-enduring-story/">NIH and the Lacks family</a>.Dylan T. Burnette, Ph.D., Vanderbilt University School of Medicine.Dylan T. Burnette, Ph.D., Vanderbilt University School of Medicine.Photograph

    Topic Tags:

    Cell Biology

    HeLa cell undergoing division into two daughter cells

    Here, a human HeLa cell (a type of immortal cell line used in laboratory experiments) is undergoing cell division. They come from cervical cancer cells that were obtained in 1951 from Henrietta Lacks, a patient at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. The final stage of division, called cytokinesis, occurs after the genomes—shown in yellow—have split into two new daughter cells. The myosin II is a motor protein shown in blue, and the actin filaments, which are types of protein that support cell structure, are shown in red. Read more about NIH and the Lacks family.

    Source

    Dylan T. Burnette, Ph.D., Vanderbilt University School of Medicine.

    Credit Line

    Dylan T. Burnette, Ph.D., Vanderbilt University School of Medicine.

    Record Type

    Photograph

    ID

    6520

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