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  • 200019683139555800787857096400394286228PublicAssets/6519During cell division, cells physically divide after separating their genetic material to create two daughter cells that are genetically identical to the parent cell. This process is important so that new cells can grow and develop. In this image, a human fibroblast cell—a type of connective tissue cell that plays a key role in wound healing and tissue repair—is dividing into two daughter cells. A cell protein called actin appears gray, the myosin II (part of the family of motor proteins responsible for muscle contractions) appears green, and DNA appears magenta. Nilay Taneja, Vanderbilt University, and Dylan T. Burnette, Ph.D., Vanderbilt University School of Medicine.Nilay Taneja, Vanderbilt University, and Dylan T. Burnette, Ph.D., Vanderbilt University School of Medicine.Photograph

    Topic Tags:

    Cell Biology

    Human fibroblast undergoing cell division

    During cell division, cells physically divide after separating their genetic material to create two daughter cells that are genetically identical to the parent cell. This process is important so that new cells can grow and develop. In this image, a human fibroblast cell—a type of connective tissue cell that plays a key role in wound healing and tissue repair—is dividing into two daughter cells. A cell protein called actin appears gray, the myosin II (part of the family of motor proteins responsible for muscle contractions) appears green, and DNA appears magenta.

    Source

    Nilay Taneja, Vanderbilt University, and Dylan T. Burnette, Ph.D., Vanderbilt University School of Medicine.

    Credit Line

    Nilay Taneja, Vanderbilt University, and Dylan T. Burnette, Ph.D., Vanderbilt University School of Medicine.

    Record Type

    Photograph

    ID

    6519

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