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  • 288419571986410288419571986410692470117203PublicAssets/3627The parasitic worm that causes schistosomiasis hatches in water and grows up in a freshwater snail, as shown here. Once mature, the worm swims back into the water, where it can infect people through skin contact. Initially, an infected person might have a rash, itchy skin or flu-like symptoms, but the real damage is done over time to internal organs. This image is part of the <a href="https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/activities-and-multimedia/life-magnified">Life Magnified</a> collection, which was displayed in the Gateway Gallery at Washington Dulles International Airport June 3, 2014, to January 21, 2015.Bo Wang and Phillip A. Newmark, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2013 FASEB BioArt winnerBo Wang and Phillip A. Newmark, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2013 FASEB BioArt winnerPhotograph

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    Larvae from the parasitic worm that causes schistosomiasis

    The parasitic worm that causes schistosomiasis hatches in water and grows up in a freshwater snail, as shown here. Once mature, the worm swims back into the water, where it can infect people through skin contact. Initially, an infected person might have a rash, itchy skin or flu-like symptoms, but the real damage is done over time to internal organs. This image is part of the Life Magnified collection, which was displayed in the Gateway Gallery at Washington Dulles International Airport June 3, 2014, to January 21, 2015.

    Source

    Bo Wang and Phillip A. Newmark, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2013 FASEB BioArt winner

    Credit Line

    Bo Wang and Phillip A. Newmark, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2013 FASEB BioArt winner

    Record Type

    Photograph

    ID

    3627

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