Detail Page

  • 1024102431458825125126235324624618591PublicAssets/3606In plants, as in animals, stem cells can transform into a variety of different cell types. The stem cells at the growing tip of this Arabidopsis plant will soon become flowers. Arabidopsis is frequently studied by cellular and molecular biologists because it grows rapidly (its entire life cycle is only 6 weeks), produces lots of seeds and has a genome that is easy to manipulate. This image is part of the Life: Magnified collection, which was displayed in the Gateway Gallery at Washington Dulles International Airport June 3, 2014, to January 21, 2015. To see all 46 images in this exhibit, go to <a href="https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/life-magnified/Pages/default.aspx">https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/life-magnified/Pages/default.aspx</a>.Arun Sampathkumar and Elliot Meyerowitz, California Institute of TechnologyArun Sampathkumar and Elliot Meyerowitz, California Institute of TechnologyPhotograph

    Flower-forming cells in a small plant related to cabbage (Arabidopsis)

    In plants, as in animals, stem cells can transform into a variety of different cell types. The stem cells at the growing tip of this Arabidopsis plant will soon become flowers. Arabidopsis is frequently studied by cellular and molecular biologists because it grows rapidly (its entire life cycle is only 6 weeks), produces lots of seeds and has a genome that is easy to manipulate. This image is part of the Life: Magnified collection, which was displayed in the Gateway Gallery at Washington Dulles International Airport June 3, 2014, to January 21, 2015. To see all 46 images in this exhibit, go to https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/life-magnified/Pages/default.aspx.

    Source

    Arun Sampathkumar and Elliot Meyerowitz, California Institute of Technology

    Credit Line

    Arun Sampathkumar and Elliot Meyerowitz, California Institute of Technology

    Record Type

    Photograph

    ID

    3606

My Images/Videos