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3738409Elastin is a fibrous protein in the extracellular matrix (ECM). It is abundant in artery walls like the one shown here. As its name indicates, elastin confers elasticity. Elastin fibers are at least five times stretchier than rubber bands of the same size. Tissues that expand, such as blood vessels and lungs, need to be both strong and elastic, so they contain both collagen (another ECM protein) and elastin. In this photo, the elastin-rich ECM is colored grayish brown and is most visible at the bottom of the photo. The curved red structures near the top of the image are red blood cells.12/17/2020 4:39:43 PM12/17/2020 4:39:43 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Coronary_artery_wall_M    Medium 199 KB 6/3/2016 3:40 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Best, Tom D. PS I would STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{41D3F9A9-B49C-4DE0-BB79-0D858A3AA798}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3739410This image shows the extracellular matrix (ECM) on the surface of a soleus (lower calf) muscle in light brown and blood vessels in pink. Near the bottom of the photo, a vessel is opened up to reveal red blood cells. Scientists know less about the ECM in muscle than in other tissues, but it's increasingly clear that the ECM is critical to muscle function, and disruption of the ECM has been associated with many muscle disorders. The ECM in muscles stores and releases growth factors, suggesting that it might play a role in cellular communication.12/17/2020 4:40:53 PM12/17/2020 4:40:53 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Soleus_muscle_M    Medium 322 KB 6/3/2016 3:40 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C The first 6 are: ?Courtesy Thomas STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{A672F8D7-6917-4ED0-8C4D-74E6AFE2A8BC}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3740411Nodes of Ranvier are short gaps in the myelin sheath surrounding myelinated nerve cells (axons). Myelin insulates axons, and the node of Ranvier is where the axon is exposed to the extracellular environment, allowing for the transmission of action potentials at these nodes via ion flows between the inside and outside of the axon. The image shows a cross-section through the node, with the surrounding ECM encasing and supporting the axon shown in cyan.12/17/2020 4:42:11 PM12/17/2020 4:42:11 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Node_of_Ranvier2_L    Low 94 KB 6/3/2016 3:40 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Nodes of Ranvier are short gaps in STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{8F452BFD-D560-46A0-B945-E3470BDBDD41}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3741412The photo shows a confocal microscopy image of perineuronal nets (PNNs), which are specialized extracellular matrix (ECM) structures in the brain. The PNN surrounds some nerve cells in brain regions including the cortex, hippocampus and thalamus. Researchers study the PNN to investigate their involvement stabilizing the extracellular environment and forming nets around nerve cells and synapses in the brain. Abnormalities in the PNNs have been linked to a variety of disorders, including epilepsy and schizophrenia, and they limit a process called neural plasticity in which new nerve connections are formed. To visualize the PNNs, researchers labeled them with Wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA)-fluorescein. Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3742">image 3742</a>.12/17/2020 5:33:10 PM12/17/2020 5:33:10 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Cortex_neuronal_ECM_M    Medium 92 KB 6/3/2016 3:40 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C TEM 5: Soleus muscle ECM on STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{49BF2F89-C3EB-46DB-A682-8EF8BF979760}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3742413The photo shows a confocal microscopy image of perineuronal nets (PNNs), which are specialized extracellular matrix (ECM) structures in the brain. The PNN surrounds some nerve cells in brain regions including the cortex, hippocampus and thalamus. Researchers study the PNN to investigate their involvement stabilizing the extracellular environment and forming nets around nerve cells and synapses in the brain. Abnormalities in the PNNs have been linked to a variety of disorders, including epilepsy and schizophrenia, and they limit a process called neural plasticity in which new nerve connections are formed. To visualize the PNNs, researchers labeled them with Wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA)-fluorescein. Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3741">image 3741</a>.12/17/2020 5:35:24 PM12/17/2020 5:35:24 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 3742_Cortex_neuronal_ECM_S    Low 128 KB 3/28/2019 4:01 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{FC6C3E72-F217-4DDB-A4D4-6C0B904EC50A}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3647478This image mostly shows normal cultured epithelial cells expressing green fluorescent protein targeted to the Golgi apparatus (yellow-green) and stained for actin (magenta) and DNA (cyan). The middle cell is an abnormal large multinucleated cell. All the cells in this image have a Golgi but not all are expressing the targeted recombinant fluorescent protein.2/4/2020 9:04:47 PM2/4/2020 9:04:47 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Epithelial cells stitched together    High 22247 KB 12/14/2018 2:49 PM Machalek, Alisa Zapp (NIH/NIGMS) [E STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{1375EFDB-18EB-442B-BDC2-F723F0A4007F}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3675496Stained kidney tissue. The kidney is an essential organ responsible for disposing wastes from the body and for maintaining healthy ion levels in the blood. It also secretes two hormones, erythropoietin (EPO) and calcitriol (a derivative of vitamin D), into the blood. It works like a purifier by pulling break-down products of metabolism, such as urea and ammonium, from the blood stream for excretion in urine. Related to image <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID=677">3725</a>. 2/4/2020 7:58:53 PM2/4/2020 7:58:53 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Slide18    High 423 KB 12/1/2020 1:07 PM Walter, Taylor (NIH/NIGMS) [C The kidney is an essential organ STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{7EE212D2-34BF-41C9-93D3-31DA36BC0BD5}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3677497Cross section of human skeletal muscle. Image taken with a confocal fluorescent light microscope.12/1/2020 6:09:36 PM12/1/2020 6:09:36 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Slide35    High 284 KB 12/1/2020 1:09 PM Walter, Taylor (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{A561A04A-186A-449A-88E2-FC32FB8148C9}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
5810569Microscopy image of tongue. One is a series of two, see image <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID=3722">5811</a>12/18/2020 8:21:03 PM12/18/2020 8:21:03 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified NCMIR tongue 1_M    Medium 172 KB 11/30/2016 2:49 PM Machalek, Alisa Zapp (NIH/NIGMS) [E STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{6D9FFCAB-3DDA-4E60-B79D-3FC08E816CA8}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
5811570Tongue One is a series of two, see image <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID=3716">5810</a>12/18/2020 8:21:57 PM12/18/2020 8:21:57 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified NCMIR tongue 2_M    Medium 160 KB 11/30/2016 2:56 PM Machalek, Alisa Zapp (NIH/NIGMS) [E STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{C44A3E73-6D22-4993-8557-8BE7EDF3478E}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3735590This image shows collagen, a fibrous protein that's the main component of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Collagen is a strong, ropelike molecule that forms stretch-resistant fibers. The most abundant protein in our bodies, collagen accounts for about a quarter of our total protein mass. Among its many functions is giving strength to our tendons, ligaments and bones and providing scaffolding for skin wounds to heal. There are about 20 different types of collagen in our bodies, each adapted to the needs of specific tissues12/17/2020 4:37:24 PM12/17/2020 4:37:24 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Collagen3_L    Low 109 KB 6/3/2016 3:40 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C There are about 20 different types of STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{01DAE8CA-F004-4A2C-8DCC-B99B03165816}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3736591The extracellular matrix (ECM) is most prevalent in connective tissues but also is present between the stems (axons) of nerve cells, as shown here. Blue-colored nerve cell axons are surrounded by brown-colored, myelin-supplying Schwann cells, which act like insulation around an electrical wire to help speed the transmission of electric nerve impulses down the axon. The ECM is pale pink. The tiny brown spots within it are the collagen fibers that are part of the ECM.12/17/2020 4:38:32 PM12/17/2020 4:38:32 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified myelinating_axons_L    Low 106 KB 6/3/2016 3:40 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C TEM 5: Soleus muscle ECM on the muscle surface STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{6FE83BF5-351D-471D-BB22-F0A000BC68F5}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3737592The extracellular matrix (ECM) is most prevalent in connective tissues but also is present between the stems (axons) of nerve cells. The axons of nerve cells are surrounded by the ECM encasing myelin-supplying Schwann cells, which insulate the axons to help speed the transmission of electric nerve impulses along the axons.12/17/2020 4:39:07 PM12/17/2020 4:39:07 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Peripheral_nerve_axonal_ECM    High 1342 KB 6/3/2016 3:40 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{F59D4181-74E8-4C83-BA1A-D5EAF198B1A1}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3339652This is a super-resolution LM image taken by Hiro Hakozaki and Masa Hoshijima of NCMIR. The image contains highlighted calcium channels in cardiac muscle using a technique called dSTORM. The microscope used in the NCMIR lab was built by Hiro Hakozaki.12/23/2020 5:37:10 PM12/23/2020 5:37:10 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified dSTORM_Cardiac1_L    Low 131 KB 6/3/2016 3:27 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{0E46207E-187E-4107-BAE4-5B30FD3E8DE2}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3371673The cerebellum is the brain's locomotion control center. Every time you shoot a basketball, tie your shoe or chop an onion, your cerebellum fires into action. Found at the base of your brain, the cerebellum is a single layer of tissue with deep folds like an accordion. People with damage to this region of the brain often have difficulty with balance, coordination and fine motor skills. For a lower magnification, see image 3370. This image is part of the Life: Magnified collection, which was displayed in the Gateway Gallery at Washington Dulles International Airport June 3, 2014, to January 21, 2015. To see all 46 images in this exhibit, go to https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/life-magnified/Pages/default.aspx.12/23/2020 7:59:31 PM12/23/2020 7:59:31 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified NCMIR_cerebellum_zoom_S    Low 21 KB 9/14/2016 11:40 AM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{FB8E30FA-4B5D-4CC2-B17A-8B480C9F0F3F}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3386676The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV),shown here as tiny purple spheres, causes the disease known as AIDS (for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome). HIV can infect multiple cells in your body, including brain cells, but its main target is a cell in the immune system called the CD4 lymphocyte (also called a T-cell or CD4 cell).12/23/2020 8:03:30 PM12/23/2020 8:03:30 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified NCMIR_HIV_infected_cell_L    Low 24 KB 6/3/2016 3:27 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{3D7073C8-3290-4F3B-9B48-714CBFC2BE59}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3387677Spinal nerves are part of the peripheral nervous system. They run within the spinal column to carry nerve signals to and from all parts of the body. The spinal nerves enable all the movements we do, from turning our heads to wiggling our toes, control the movements of our internal organs, such as the colon and the bladder, as well as allow us to feel touch and location of our limbs.12/23/2020 8:04:47 PM12/23/2020 8:04:47 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified NCMIR_human_spinal_nerve_L    Low 30 KB 6/3/2016 3:27 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{64E261D1-CBF3-4145-AB2D-8F5C90A18B68}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3389678The small intestine is where most of our nutrients from the food we eat are absorbed into the bloodstream. The walls of the intestine contain small finger-like projections called villi which increase the organ's surface area, enhancing nutrient absorption. It consists of the duodenum, which connects to the stomach, the jejenum and the ileum, which connects with the large intestine. Related to <a href="http://images.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3389" target=_blank>image 3390</a> .10/14/2020 8:45:49 PM10/14/2020 8:45:49 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified NCMIR_intestine-1_L    Low 39 KB 6/3/2016 3:27 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C The small intestine is where most STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{49CE5FB2-46F4-4727-845D-4F0A2269E7EB}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3390679The small intestine is where most of our nutrients from the food we eat are absorbed into the bloodstream. The walls of the intestine contain small finger-like projections called villi which increase the organ's surface area, enhancing nutrient absorption. It consists of the duodenum, which connects to the stomach, the jejenum and the ileum, which connects with the large intestine. Related to <a href="http://images.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3389" target=_blank>image 3389</a> .12/23/2020 8:05:19 PM12/23/2020 8:05:19 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified NCMIR_intestine-2_L    Low 28 KB 6/3/2016 3:28 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C The small intestine is where most STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{A08D409D-7110-489B-8548-C499D3A28774}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
638768612/21/2020 5:16:04 PM12/21/2020 5:16:04 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Blood clot_M    Medium 557 KB 9/18/2019 2:02 PM Machalek, Alisa Zapp (NIH/NIGMS) [E STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{569F0548-B89D-42E2-8313-CE93BB941D7D}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
638868712/21/2020 5:16:51 PM12/21/2020 5:16:51 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified E. coli_M    Medium 203 KB 3/13/2018 3:59 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{52B9AB37-C0A9-4E84-9332-67CFB7D18183}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
5793751What looks like the gossamer wings of a butterfly is actually the retina of a mouse, delicately snipped to lay flat and sparkling with fluorescent molecules. The image is from a research project investigating the promise of gene therapy for glaucoma. It was created at an NIGMS-funded advanced microscopy facility that develops technology for imaging across many scales, from whole organisms to cells to individual molecules. <BR><BR> The ability to obtain high-resolution imaging of tissue as large as whole mouse retinas was made possible by a technique called large-scale mosaic confocal microscopy, which was pioneered by the NIGMS-funded National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research. The technique is similar to Google Earth in that it computationally stitches together many small, high-resolution images. <BR><BR> More details: <BR><BR> Glaucoma is a progressive eye disease and the leading cause of irreversible blindness. It is characterized by the death of neurons in the retina called retinal ganglion cells. A number of studies over the past decade suggest that targeting these cells with gene therapy designed to prevent their death might slow the progression of glaucoma. <BR><BR> This study is investigating whether a non-disease-causing virus (adeno-associated virus serotype 2) can effectively deliver genes to retinal ganglion cells. The researchers introduced into the virus a gene for green fluorescent protein (GFP) so they could visualize how well the virus transduced the cells. <BR><BR> Two months after viral delivery of the fluorescent vector to the eyes of 7-month-old mice, the researchers examined the entire retinas of the subjects under a microscope. The ability to obtain high-resolution imaging of tissue as large as whole mouse retinas was made possible by a technique called large-scale mosaic confocal microscopy, which was pioneered by the NIGMS-funded National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research. The technique is similar to Google Earth in that it computationally stitches together many small, high-resolution images. <BR><BR> The researchers observed GFP expression (yellow) in all parts of the retinal ganglion cells (blue), including the soma, axons and dendritic tree. These results suggest that a viral delivery system could deliver therapeutic genes to retinal ganglion cells for treating glaucoma and related diseases. <BR><BR> EQUIPMENT: Olympus FluoView™ FV1000 Confocal Microscope. Fluorophores: green fluorescent protein and Alexa Fluor 568. Non-glaucomatous DBA/2J-Gpnmb+ mice. <BR><BR> Reflecting on the work, the lead researcher [Keunyoung (“Christine”) Kim] says: “It is amazing to see intricate and artistically organized microscopic structures. … I encountered an entirely new world invisible to the naked eye—a galaxy of infinite secrets and endless potential for discovery.” 12/18/2020 8:02:50 PM12/18/2020 8:02:50 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Mouse retina-II NCMIR-lowresoln    Low 172 KB 10/19/2016 11:45 AM Machalek, Alisa Zapp (NIH/NIGMS) [E STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{E2CC74AB-01A0-4BBC-964B-CF278FF727BA}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
5795752The cerebellum is the brain's locomotion control center. Found at the base of your brain, the cerebellum is a single layer of tissue with deep folds like an accordion. People with damage to this region of the brain often have difficulty with balance, coordination and fine motor skills. <BR><BR> This image of a mouse cerebellum is part of a collection of such images in different colors and at different levels of magnification from the National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research (NCMIR). 12/18/2020 8:04:56 PM12/18/2020 8:04:56 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Cerebellum NCMIR 6 thumbnail    Thumbnail 162 KB 10/20/2016 9:53 AM Machalek, Alisa Zapp (NIH/NIGMS) [E STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{51114BD0-267F-4AD6-B07F-9A02145A27BC}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
5800753The cerebellum is the brain's locomotion control center. Found at the base of your brain, the cerebellum is a single layer of tissue with deep folds like an accordion. People with damage to this region of the brain often have difficulty with balance, coordination and fine motor skills. <BR><BR> This image of a mouse cerebellum is part of a collection of such images in different colors and at different levels of magnification from the National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research (NCMIR). 12/18/2020 8:15:56 PM12/18/2020 8:15:56 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 5800_Cerebellum NCMIR 3_S    Low 187 KB 3/29/2019 9:40 AM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{36912780-6BD8-4344-8A6D-C1AC2F04A424}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3308762This image of the hippocampus was taken with an ultra-widefield high-speed multiphoton laser microscope. Tissue was stained to reveal the organization of glial cells (cyan), neurofilaments (green) and DNA (yellow). The microscope Deerinck used was developed in conjunction with Roger Tsien (2008 Nobel laureate in Chemistry) and remains a powerful and unique tool today (2012, almost 20 years after it was developed).2/23/2021 3:50:22 PM2/23/2021 3:50:22 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Rat_hippocampus_L    Low 340 KB 6/3/2016 3:26 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C This image appeared on the cover STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{867C6F73-44D5-4EA6-ADDB-F37067BC7A59}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3309763A genetic disorder of the nervous system, neurofibromatosis causes tumors to form on nerves throughout the body, including a type of tumor called an optic nerve glioma that can result in childhood blindness. The image was used to demonstrate the unique imaging capabilities of one of our newest (at the time) laser scanning microscopes and is of a wildtype (normal) mouse retina in the optic fiber layer. This layer is responsible for relaying information from the retina to the brain and was fluorescently stained to reveal the distribution of glial cells (green), DNA and RNA in the cell bodies of the retinal ganglion neurons (orange) and their optic nerve fibers (red), and actin in endothelial cells surrounding a prominent branching blood vessel (blue). By studying the microscopic structure of normal and diseased retina and optic nerves, we hope to better understand the altered biology of the tissues in these tumors with the prospects of developing therapeutic interventions.12/23/2020 4:44:59 PM12/23/2020 4:44:59 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Retina-NCMIR_L    Low 402 KB 6/3/2016 3:26 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C This image appeared on the cover of Nature STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{636C5DED-A74C-4429-92ED-F02A055687BE}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
587284212/18/2020 9:07:22 PM12/18/2020 9:07:22 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified retina_M    Medium 1815 KB 4/22/2017 12:14 PM Machalek, Alisa Zapp (NIH/NIGMS) [E STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{C7CD33E0-7131-4C93-A259-9A50E5AAB84E}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3392876Stained glomeruli in the kidney. The kidney is an essential organ responsible for disposing wastes from the body and for maintaining healthy ion levels in the blood. It works like a purifier by pulling break-down products of metabolism, such as urea and ammonium, from the blood stream for excretion in urine. The glomerulus is a structure that helps filter the waste compounds from the blood. It consists of a network of capillaries enclosed within a Bowman's capsule of a nephron, which is the structure in which ions exit or re-enter the blood in the kidney.12/23/2020 8:07:21 PM12/23/2020 8:07:21 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified NCMIR_kidney_glomereolus_L    Low 34 KB 6/3/2016 3:28 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{91D93B75-49F2-41DB-9621-4ABF190E134E}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3395877Stained cross section of the mouse tail.12/23/2020 8:12:46 PM12/23/2020 8:12:46 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified NCMIR_mouse_tail-L    High 596 KB 2/22/2021 3:05 PM Dolan, Lauren (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{F1CB272B-5544-4534-9CFD-C4A8CCADE973}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3396878Myelinated axons in a rat spinal root. Myelin is a type of fat that forms a sheath around and thus insulates the axon to protect it from losing the electrical current needed to transmit signals along the axon. The axoplasm inside the axon is shown in pink. Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3397">image 3397</a>.12/23/2020 8:16:48 PM12/23/2020 8:16:48 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified NCMIR_myelinated_axons-1_L    Low 34 KB 6/3/2016 3:28 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{D083B105-C905-4289-8543-07308D7695A7}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3397879Top view of myelinated axons in a rat spinal root. Myelin is a type of fat that forms a sheath around and thus insulates the axon to protect it from losing the electrical current needed to transmit signals along the axon. The axoplasm inside the axon is shown in pink. Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3396">image 3396</a>.12/23/2020 8:19:29 PM12/23/2020 8:19:29 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified NCMIR_myelinated_axons-2    High 383 KB 6/3/2016 3:28 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{19EC29ED-F2B0-43D7-84B5-559C848F745B}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
63898832/3/2020 7:41:16 PM2/3/2020 7:41:16 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Red and white blood cells in lung_M    Medium 484 KB 3/13/2018 4:02 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{80CC8DC3-7C67-40C7-A007-3A53BB871004}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3520925Multiphoton fluorescence image of HeLa cells with cytoskeletal microtubules (magenta) and DNA (cyan). Nikon RTS2000MP custom laser scanning microscope. See related images 3518,3519,3521,3522.9/27/2020 3:31:22 AM9/27/2020 3:31:22 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified HeLa_cells_3_L    Low 235 KB 6/3/2016 3:30 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{A4126921-9441-48BB-8C06-DF820C7925D4}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3521926Multiphoton fluorescence image of HeLa cells stained with the actin binding toxin phalloidin (red), microtubules (cyan) and cell nuclei (blue). Nikon RTS2000MP custom laser scanning microscope. See related images 3518,3519,3520,3522.9/27/2020 3:39:33 AM9/27/2020 3:39:33 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified HeLa_cells_2_L    Low 134 KB 6/3/2016 3:30 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{23E73D20-7634-4D67-8AE3-852B4FDFDFA8}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3522927Multiphoton fluorescence image of cultured HeLa cells with a fluorescent protein targeted to the Golgi apparatus (orange), microtubules (green) and counterstained for DNA (cyan). Nikon RTS2000MP custom laser scanning microscope. See related images 3518,3519,3520,3521.9/27/2020 3:38:02 AM9/27/2020 3:38:02 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified HeLa_cells_1_L    Low 101 KB 6/3/2016 3:30 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{02904D0C-5907-4F49-8704-9EAD971B040C}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
36701169DNA (blue) and actin (red) in cultured fibroblast cells.12/1/2020 6:03:48 PM12/1/2020 6:03:48 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Slide42_M    High 76 KB 12/1/2020 1:03 PM Walter, Taylor (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{510C3957-9EED-48BB-BD5F-C46241DA60BC}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
37231189This photograph of kidney tissue was taken using fluorescent light microscopy. For a close-up version and more detailed description, see image <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID=677">3725</a>. Related to image <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID=663">3675</a>.2/16/2021 11:12:30 PM2/16/2021 11:12:30 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified NCMIR kidney thumbnail    Thumbnail 41 KB 10/12/2016 9:55 AM Machalek, Alisa Zapp (NIH/NIGMS) [E STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{7516E121-D9D7-4791-B20E-C4FBEA560B04}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
37251191This photograph of kidney tissue, taken using fluorescent light microscopy, shows a close-up view of part of image <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID=675">3732</a>. Kidneys filter the blood, removing waste and excessive fluid, which is excreted in urine. The filtration system is made up of components that include glomeruli (for example, the round structure taking up much of the image's center is a glomerulus) and tubules (seen in cross-section here with their inner lining stained green). Related to image <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID=663">3675</a> .2/16/2021 11:08:39 PM2/16/2021 11:08:39 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 3725_NCMIR_kidney_S    Low 185 KB 3/28/2019 4:02 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{F232278C-7ACB-49C9-B51C-585DF7F8A915}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131