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35801158Industrious V. cholerae bacteria (yellow) tend to thrive in denser biofilms (left) while moochers (red) thrive in weaker biofilms (right). More information about the research behind this image can be found in a <a href="http://biobeat.nigms.nih.gov/2014/02/cool-image-denying-microbial-moochers/">Biomedical Beat Blog posting</a> from February 2014.10/5/2020 6:16:25 AM10/5/2020 6:16:25 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified V_M._cholerae_biofilms_32    Medium 50 KB 6/3/2016 3:32 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx8050https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{21F937D8-3F14-4784-AC98-9E76BB4A34A8}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2319588Like a map showing heavily traveled roads, this mathematical model of metabolic activity inside an <i>E. coli</i> cell shows the busiest pathway in white. Reaction pathways used less frequently by the cell are marked in red (moderate activity) and green (even less activity). Visualizations like this one may help scientists identify drug targets that block key metabolic pathways in bacteria. Featured in the January 18, 2005, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/05-01-18/#1 target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.10/29/2020 1:35:42 PM10/29/2020 1:35:42 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2319_mapping_metabolic_S    Low 141 KB 3/29/2019 1:49 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx6750https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{B5BAE43D-B385-47C4-9F8E-2C6E2AE6AB0C}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
65681272These images illustrate a technique combining cryo-electron tomography and super-resolution fluorescence microscopy called correlative imaging by annotation with single molecules (CIASM). CIASM enables researchers to identify small structures and individual molecules in cells that they couldn’t using older techniques. 12/22/2020 3:22:47 PM12/22/2020 3:22:47 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Figure_2_72dpi    Thumbnail 63 KB 7/16/2020 3:27 PM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx8350https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{93F7C98F-C6A0-4FA2-A019-AA17C2A1B17F}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
58881005This graphic that resembles a firework was created from a picture of a <a href=https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=3451>fruit fly spermatid</a>. This fruit fly spermatid recycles various molecules, including malformed or damaged proteins. Actin filaments (red) in the cell draw unwanted proteins toward a barrel-shaped structure called the proteasome (green clusters), which degrades the molecules into their basic parts for re-use.7/12/2022 6:18:40 PM7/12/2022 6:18:40 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified firework    Low 69 KB 6/1/2017 3:16 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C Actin filaments (red) in the cell draw unwanted proteins STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx8850https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{CDBB078F-7B9C-4463-BD50-C1E700A616EE}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3251516Neurons (green) and glial cells from isolated dorsal root ganglia express COX-2 (red) after exposure to an inflammatory stimulus (cell nuclei are blue). Lawrence Marnett and colleagues have demonstrated that certain drugs selectively block COX-2 metabolism of endocannabinoids -- naturally occurring analgesic molecules -- in stimulated dorsal root ganglia. Featured in the October 20, 2011 issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/11-10-20/index.html#1><i>Biomedical Beat</i></a>.12/22/2020 4:34:36 PM12/22/2020 4:34:36 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified marnett_drg_cox2_S    Low 52 KB 9/14/2016 11:28 AM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx7350https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{C8982B6C-1BAB-4C7F-BDB5-00ECC4E4D63D}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2299455A two-dimensional NMR spectrum of a protein, in this case a 2D 1H-15N HSQC NMR spectrum of a 228 amino acid DNA/RNA-binding protein. To view PDF files, you may need: <a href="http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/readstep2_allversions.html">Adobe Acrobat Reader</a> <a href="http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/readstep2_allversions.html"><img src="http://www.nigms.nih.gov/nigms.nih.gov/Images/exitdisclaimer.gif" alt="Link to external Web site" width="12px" height="12px" style="border:0px;" /></a>2/3/2021 10:01:10 PM2/3/2021 10:01:10 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified CUGBP1_2D-HSQC_Thumb    Thumbnail 70 KB 2/3/2021 4:59 PM McCulley, Jennifer (NIH/NIDCD) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx6750https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{6276098D-3ABF-492B-9D19-2DF47983F869}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2709505DNA doesn't leave a fossil record in stone, the way bones do. Instead, the DNA code itself holds the best evidence for organisms' genetic history. Some of the most telling evidence about genetic history comes from retroviruses, the remnants of ancient viral infections.8/6/2020 5:55:28 PM8/6/2020 5:55:28 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified EHarrington_Retrovirus_L    Low 77 KB 6/3/2016 3:16 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C As a side note: I am working with the STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx7550https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{95E0D62D-D043-41F2-8870-7EF913FD50BE}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
67681223Rhodopsin is a pigment in the rod cells of the retina (back of the eye). It is extremely light-sensitive, supporting vision in low-light conditions. Here, it is attached to arrestin, a protein that sends signals in the body. This structure was determined using an X-ray free electron laser.6/27/2021 7:16:00 PM6/27/2021 7:16:00 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 5w0p_assembly-1_L    Low 10 KB 9/21/2021 10:21 AM Dolan, Lauren (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx7750https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{20059BCD-8181-42F5-B69A-43B5BD2A1244}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
1191574This transmission electron micrograph shows sections of mouse sperm tails, or flagella.3/13/2023 7:28:57 PM3/13/2023 7:28:57 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified sperm9x2c_L    High 19 KB 1/29/2021 1:51 PM McCulley, Jennifer (NIH/NIDCD) [C You can probably also use the STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx6250https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{F06B38CE-BBCD-4B40-95A5-D56FF589C042}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
5780998Ribosomes are complex machines made up of more than 50 proteins and three or four strands of genetic material called ribosomal RNA (rRNA). The busy cellular machines make proteins, which are critical to almost every structure and function in the cell. To do so, they read following protein-building instructions, which come as strands of messenger RNA. Ribosomes are found in all forms of cellular life—people, plants, animals, even bacteria. This illustration of a bacterial ribosome was produced using detailed information about the position of every atom in the complex. Several antibiotic medicines work by disrupting bacterial ribosomes but leaving human ribosomes alone. Scientists are carefully comparing human and bacterial ribosomes to spot differences between the two. Structures that are present only in the bacterial version could serve as targets for new antibiotic medications.12/18/2020 8:00:42 PM12/18/2020 8:00:42 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified PDB 121-70SRibosomes_2wdk_2wdl_front_M    Medium 76 KB 8/31/2016 2:44 PM Machalek, Alisa (NIH/NIAMS) [E STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx10460https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{AFD33B76-302D-4052-9726-239615EBB6FE}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3449880Living primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Mitochondria (green) stained with the mitochondrial membrane potential indicator, rhodamine 123. Nuclei (blue) are stained with DAPI. Caption from a November 26, 2012 <a href= "http://www.uphs.upenn.edu/news/News_Releases/2012/11/energy/">news release </a> from U Penn (Penn Medicine).8/22/2020 6:35:39 PM8/22/2020 6:35:39 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified From: Kevin Foskett [mailto:foskett@mail.med.upenn.edu] Sent: Wednesday, May 15, 2013 11:14 AM To: Kreeger, Karen Subject: Re: Permission from NIGMS STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx8560https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{B8716C1C-A233-4176-8164-F8FDF7922338}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
1265763Signal obtained by allowing proteins in human serum to interact with glycan (polysaccharide) arrays. The arrays are shown in replicate so the pattern is clear. Each spot contains a specific type of glycan. Proteins have bound to the spots highlighted in green.10/28/2020 4:09:56 PM10/28/2020 4:09:56 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Human_serum_2x2_grid_S    Low 10 KB 9/8/2016 3:05 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx6780https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{5017BB71-D3DA-4011-A1F0-2B6FEA796851}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3556956Luciferase-based imaging enables visualization and quantification of internal organs and transplanted cells in live adult zebrafish. In this image, a cardiac muscle-restricted promoter drives firefly luciferase expression. Lateral (Top) and overhead views (Bottom) are shown.10/5/2020 5:20:22 AM10/5/2020 5:20:22 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Poss-zebrafish-01    High 416 KB 6/3/2016 3:31 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C br>For imagery of the overhead STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx102110https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{3D1F01B8-728A-4F3D-B381-CF2B50DEAA2C}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2746843Sulfite oxidase is an enzyme that is essential for normal neurological development in children. This video shows the active site of the enzyme and its molybdenum cofactor visible as a faint ball-and-stick representation buried within the protein. The positively charged channel (blue) at the active site contains a chloride ion (green) and three water molecules (red). As the protein oscillates, one can see directly down the positively charged channel. At the bottom is the molybdenum atom of the active site (light blue) and its oxo group (red) that is transferred to sulfite to form sulfate in the catalytic reaction.8/18/2020 7:39:49 PM8/18/2020 7:39:49 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified activesite-thumb    Thumbnail 815 KB 6/21/2016 11:25 AM aavarkalavr (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx7260https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{F3FBD1F8-19E8-4FD9-8FFA-6D2A41F188E6}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
58381201This image results from a research project to visualize which regions of the adult fruit fly (Drosophila) brain derive from each neural stem cell. First, researchers collected several thousand fruit fly larvae and fluorescently stained a random stem cell in the brain of each. The idea was to create a population of larvae in which each of the 100 or so neural stem cells was labeled at least once. When the larvae grew to adults, the researchers examined the flies’ brains using confocal microscopy. With this technique, the part of a fly’s brain that derived from a single, labeled stem cell “lights up.” The scientists photographed each brain and digitally colorized its lit-up area. By combining thousands of such photos, they created a 3-dimensional, color-coded map that shows which part of the Drosophila brain comes from each of its ~100 neural stem cells. In other words, each colored region shows which neurons are the progeny or “clones” of a single stem cell. This work established a hierarchical structure as well as nomenclature for the neurons in the Drosophila brain. Further research will relate functions to structures of the brain. Related to image <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID=3808">5868</a> and video<a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID=3749"> 5843</a> 5/13/2022 12:38:45 PM5/13/2022 12:38:45 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 5838_droso_x10_crop from Utah BTRR--Chris Johnson_S    Low 166 KB 3/28/2019 2:31 PM Constantinides, Stephen STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx9270https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{E35C7327-EDA4-46DF-B3D4-A0F7CF02CCC0}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
5793999What looks like the gossamer wings of a butterfly is actually the retina of a mouse, delicately snipped to lay flat and sparkling with fluorescent molecules. The image is from a research project investigating the promise of gene therapy for glaucoma. It was created at an NIGMS-funded advanced microscopy facility that develops technology for imaging across many scales, from whole organisms to cells to individual molecules. <BR><BR> The ability to obtain high-resolution imaging of tissue as large as whole mouse retinas was made possible by a technique called large-scale mosaic confocal microscopy, which was pioneered by the NIGMS-funded National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research. The technique is similar to Google Earth in that it computationally stitches together many small, high-resolution images. <BR><BR> More details: <BR><BR> Glaucoma is a progressive eye disease and the leading cause of irreversible blindness. It is characterized by the death of neurons in the retina called retinal ganglion cells. A number of studies over the past decade suggest that targeting these cells with gene therapy designed to prevent their death might slow the progression of glaucoma. <BR><BR> This study is investigating whether a non-disease-causing virus (adeno-associated virus serotype 2) can effectively deliver genes to retinal ganglion cells. The researchers introduced into the virus a gene for green fluorescent protein (GFP) so they could visualize how well the virus transduced the cells. <BR><BR> Two months after viral delivery of the fluorescent vector to the eyes of 7-month-old mice, the researchers examined the entire retinas of the subjects under a microscope. The ability to obtain high-resolution imaging of tissue as large as whole mouse retinas was made possible by a technique called large-scale mosaic confocal microscopy, which was pioneered by the NIGMS-funded National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research. The technique is similar to Google Earth in that it computationally stitches together many small, high-resolution images. <BR><BR> The researchers observed GFP expression (yellow) in all parts of the retinal ganglion cells (blue), including the soma, axons and dendritic tree. These results suggest that a viral delivery system could deliver therapeutic genes to retinal ganglion cells for treating glaucoma and related diseases. <BR><BR> EQUIPMENT: Olympus FluoView™ FV1000 Confocal Microscope. Fluorophores: green fluorescent protein and Alexa Fluor 568. Non-glaucomatous DBA/2J-Gpnmb+ mice. <BR><BR> Reflecting on the work, the lead researcher [Keunyoung (“Christine”) Kim] says: “It is amazing to see intricate and artistically organized microscopic structures. … I encountered an entirely new world invisible to the naked eye—a galaxy of infinite secrets and endless potential for discovery.” 7/19/2023 8:25:17 PM7/19/2023 8:25:17 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Mouse retina-II NCMIR-lowresoln    Low 172 KB 10/19/2016 11:45 AM Machalek, Alisa (NIH/NIAMS) [E STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx9570https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{E2CC74AB-01A0-4BBC-964B-CF278FF727BA}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
65921217Cell-like compartments that spontaneously emerged from scrambled frog eggs, with nuclei (blue) from frog sperm. Endoplasmic reticulum (red) and microtubules (green) are also visible. Image created using confocal microscopy. <br> <p>For more photos of cell-like compartments from frog eggs view: <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6584">6584</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6585">6585</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6586">6586</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6591">6591</a>, and <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6593">6593</a>.</p> <p>For videos of cell-like compartments from frog eggs view:&nbsp;<a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6587">6587</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6588">6588</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6589">6589</a>, and <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6590">6590</a>.</p>9/13/2020 3:38:40 PM9/13/2020 3:38:40 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified img5_cheng_confocal_nuc_t40_M    Medium 66 KB 9/15/2020 10:07 AM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx7560https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{10111D22-D87A-4A9F-82B8-5C98DB9E5D44}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
5772994Ovarioles in female insects are tubes in which egg cells (called oocytes) form at one end and complete their development as they reach the other end of the tube. This image, taken with a confocal microscope, shows ovarioles in a very popular lab animal, the fruit fly Drosophila. The basic structure of ovarioles supports very rapid egg production, with some insects (like termites) producing several thousand eggs per day. Each insect ovary typically contains 4–8 ovarioles, but this number varies widely depending on the insect species. <Br><Br>Scientists use insect ovarioles, for example, to study the basic processes that help various insects, including those that cause disease (like some mosquitos and biting flies), reproduce very quickly.12/18/2020 7:51:27 PM12/18/2020 7:51:27 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Kirilly04-ovaries_M    Medium 67 KB 8/4/2016 10:58 AM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C Please let me know if you have any STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx130100https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{2F3BB903-70BD-41BD-83EC-FFDE93D625AB}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2649839Fluorescent markers show the interconnected web of tubes and compartments in the endoplasmic reticulum. The protein atlastin helps build and maintain this critical part of cells. The image is from a July 2009 <a href=http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2009-07/ru-lpf072909.php target="_blank">news release</a>.11/6/2020 9:09:17 PM11/6/2020 9:09:17 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2649_endoplasmic_S    Low 166 KB 3/29/2019 11:04 AM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx76180https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{20BB4B63-1487-4B55-B7AB-04CA407D26CC}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2354595Electron density maps such as this one are generated from the diffraction patterns of X-rays passing through protein crystals. These maps are then used to generate a model of the protein's structure by fitting the protein's amino acid sequence (yellow) into the observed electron density (blue).10/29/2020 3:42:22 PM10/29/2020 3:42:22 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified hi_3a_isas_map_L    Low 49 KB 6/3/2016 3:09 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx8090https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{7219C040-55C6-48C5-A3B0-A1A1A03C2919}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
1275769The Golgi complex, also called the Golgi apparatus or, simply, the Golgi. This organelle receives newly made proteins and lipids from the ER, puts the finishing touches on them, addresses them, and sends them to their final destinations. Appears in the NIGMS booklet <a href="http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/insidethecell/" target="_blank"><i>Inside the Cell</i></a>.10/28/2020 4:29:29 PM10/28/2020 4:29:29 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified ITC_Golgi_inset_Copy_M    Medium 28 KB 10/28/2020 12:29 PM McCulley, Jennifer (NIH/NIDCD) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx3923220https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{F1ACB139-25A3-4C54-8EE3-575084FC6DB6}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2514816HIV is a retrovirus, a type of virus that carries its genetic material not as DNA but as RNA. Long before anyone had heard of HIV, researchers in labs all over the world studied retroviruses, tracing out their life cycle and identifying the key proteins the viruses use to infect cells. When HIV was identified as a retrovirus, these studies gave AIDS researchers an immediate jump-start. The previously identified viral proteins became initial drug targets. See images <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=2513">2513</a> and <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=2515">2515</a> for other versions of this illustration. Featured in <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/structlife/ target="_blank"><i>The Structures of Life</i></a>.9/25/2020 4:29:40 PM9/25/2020 4:29:40 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2514_Life_of_an_AIDS_Virus_with_labels_T    Thumbnail 117 KB 4/19/2019 12:29 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx7860https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{7C26D3D2-FF70-420C-A0BC-1E2725806E59}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3284862These neural precursor cells were derived from human embryonic stem cells. The neural cell bodies are stained red, and the nuclei are blue. Image and caption information courtesy of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine.12/22/2020 10:44:53 PM12/22/2020 10:44:53 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified NeuronsfromhumanEScells    High 410 KB 6/3/2016 3:25 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx5770https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{F15E9276-1E44-4DEF-AC56-EB3B93CB40F4}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2325594In 2006, scientists developed an optical microscopy technique enabling them to clearly see individual molecules within cells. In 2007, they took the technique, abbreviated STORM, a step further. They identified multicolored probes that let them peer into cells and clearly see multiple cellular components at the same time, such as these microtubules (green) and small hollows called clathrin-coated pits (red). Unlike conventional methods, the multicolor STORM technique produces a crisp and high resolution picture. A sharper view of how cellular components interact will likely help scientists answer some longstanding questions about cell biology. Featured in the October 17, 2007, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/07-10-17/#1 target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.10/29/2020 2:02:16 PM10/29/2020 2:02:16 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified multicolorstorm1_L    Low 76 KB 6/3/2016 3:08 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C They identified multicolored probes that let them peer into STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx99110https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{76D31C7C-D8E7-4BC2-BCAB-8D4B7465DE4F}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2343659This crystal structure shows a conserved hypothetical protein from <i>Mycobacterium tuberculosis</i>. Only 12 other proteins share its sequence homology, and none has a known function. This structure indicates the protein may play a role in metabolic pathways. Featured as one of the August 2007 Protein Structure Initiative Structures of the Month.10/29/2020 2:48:36 PM10/29/2020 2:48:36 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2343_Mtuberculosis_S    Low 127 KB 3/29/2019 1:42 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx8480https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{C049B741-42A1-4298-8E5F-15EE784B48B7}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
67971255Yeast cells that abnormally accumulate cell wall material (blue) at their ends and, when preparing to divide, in their middles. This image was captured using wide-field microscopy with deconvolution. <Br><Br> Related to images <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6791">6791</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6792">6792</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6793">6793</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6794">6794</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6798">6798</a>, and videos <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6795">6795</a> and <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6796">6796</a>.7/17/2023 5:08:11 PM7/17/2023 5:08:11 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified YeastCells7_S    Low 12 KB 3/8/2022 9:44 AM Bigler, Abbey (NIH/NIGMS) [C Some of them have one blue end, and STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx8780https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{DDA4D0F0-1444-48F3-91F8-795F76B0BC06}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3287865This image shows a layer of retinal pigment epithelium cells derived from human embryonic stem cells, highlighting the nuclei (red) and cell surfaces (green). This kind of retinal cell is responsible for macular degeneration, the most common cause of blindness. Image and caption information courtesy of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine.12/22/2020 10:50:24 PM12/22/2020 10:50:24 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 3287_Retinalpigmentepithelium02_S    Low 204 KB 3/29/2019 10:38 AM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx10560https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{E406EE03-5081-4F98-B478-B6C42E410963}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2388674Solution NMR structure of protein target WR41 (left) from <i>C. elegans</i>. Noting the unanticipated structural similarity to the ubiquitin protein (Ub) found in all eukaryotic cells, researchers discovered that WR41 is a Ub-like modifier, ubiquitin-fold modifier 1 (Ufm1), on a newly uncovered ubiquitin-like pathway. Subsequently, the PSI group also determined the three-dimensional structure of protein target HR41 (right) from humans, the E2 ligase for Ufm1, using both NMR and X-ray crystallography.10/29/2020 4:56:46 PM10/29/2020 4:56:46 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2388_wr_hr41_S    Low 63 KB 3/29/2019 11:29 AM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx378080https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{9831464C-3582-4504-A4D7-DFC565D64ADE}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
67901290Two cells over a 2-hour period. The one on the bottom left goes through programmed cell death, also known as apoptosis. The one on the top right goes through cell division, also called mitosis. This video was captured using a confocal microscope. 12/27/2021 4:57:37 PM12/27/2021 4:57:37 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified CellDiv-Death-Thumb    Thumbnail 166 KB 12/27/2021 12:48 PM Dolan, Lauren (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx10280https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{CC8B5303-F2D9-4014-B9B9-68597C41C367}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
65821068Three <i>C. elegans</i>, tiny roundworms, with a ribosomal protein glowing red and muscle fibers glowing green. Researchers used these worms to study a molecular pathway that affects aging. The ribosomal protein is involved in protein translation and may play a role in dietary restriction-induced longevity. Image created using confocal microscopy. <br>View single roundworm here <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6581">6581</a>. <br> View closeup of roundworms here <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6583">6583</a>.3/19/2021 8:20:52 PM3/19/2021 8:20:52 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified ThreeWorms_M    Medium 49 KB 8/10/2020 8:39 PM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx6880https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{AFFC83D5-1CA9-4F1F-AB09-4C4B88D3E492}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3330929Cells move forward with lamellipodia and filopodia supported by networks and bundles of actin filaments. Proper, controlled cell movement is a complex process. Recent research has shown that an actin-polymerizing factor called the Arp2/3 complex is the key component of the actin polymerization engine that drives amoeboid cell motility. ARPC3, a component of the Arp2/3 complex, plays a critical role in actin nucleation. In this photo, the ARPC3+/+ fibroblast cells were fixed and stained with Alexa 546 phalloidin for F-actin (red), mDia1 (green), and DAPI to visualize the nucleus (blue). mDia1 is localized at the Lamellipodia of ARPC3+/+ fibroblast cells. Related information available in a Stowers Institute <a href=http://www.stowers.org/media/news/apr-9-2012 target="_blank"> news release</a>. This image is part of a series of images; related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3328">image 3328</a> , <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3329">image 3329</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3331">image 3331</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3332">image 3332</a> and <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3333">image 3333</a>.12/23/2020 5:26:49 PM12/23/2020 5:26:49 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified mDia1-Pic-3_L    Low 71 KB 6/3/2016 3:27 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C mDia1 is localized at the Lamellipodia STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx10770https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{359C0BA3-7889-4638-989F-99B3C1EEBFE9}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2667840Professor Marc Zimmer's family pets, including these fish, glow in the dark in response to blue light. Featured in the September 2009 issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/findings/index.htm target="_blank"><i>Findings</i></a>.11/6/2020 9:11:31 PM11/6/2020 9:11:31 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2667_glowing_S    Low 32 KB 3/29/2019 11:03 AM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx87100https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{16399043-CE98-49AE-B1BC-49009124078B}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
66111282Circadian rhythms are physical, mental, and behavioral changes that follow a 24-hour cycle. Typical circadian rhythms lead to high energy during the middle of the day (10 a.m. to 1 p.m.) and an afternoon slump. At night, circadian rhythms cause the hormone melatonin to rise, making a person sleepy. <Br><Br> Learn more in NIGMS’ circadian rhythms <a href="https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/fact-sheets/Pages/circadian-rhythms.aspx">featured topics page</a>. <Br><Br>See <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6612">6612</a> for the Spanish version of this infographic. 1/5/2024 4:54:05 PM1/5/2024 4:54:05 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified CR_TeenTimeline_Opt3B_M    Medium 343 KB 2/12/2021 9:29 AM Walter, Taylor (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx11480https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{824D535B-F568-41B6-99E0-0EFFC580F9A2}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
67891289Two mouse fibroblasts, one of the most common types of cells in mammalian connective tissue. They play a key role in wound healing and tissue repair. This image was captured using structured illumination microscopy. 12/27/2021 4:20:11 PM12/27/2021 4:20:11 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Two mouse fibroblast cells_M    Medium 627 KB 12/27/2021 11:20 AM Dolan, Lauren (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx10290https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{911FF0EB-C528-450C-93F7-22CEEFA45FCF}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
68971299A zebrafish embryo showing its natural colors. Zebrafish have see-through eggs and embryos, making them ideal research organisms for studying the earliest stages of development. This image was taken in transmitted light under a polychromatic polarizing microscope. 6/30/2022 12:03:38 PM6/30/2022 12:03:38 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Zebrafish_M    Medium 27 KB 6/30/2022 8:04 AM Crowley, Rachel (NIH/NIGMS) [E I have more images, which I can share with the NIGMS Image and Video STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx9880https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{B1FED72B-6831-4E21-B021-678F186C50C4}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2807856Confocal image showing high levels of the protein vimentin (white) at the edge zone of a quail embryo. Cell nuclei are labeled green. More specifically, this high-magnification (60X) image shows vimentin immunofluorescence in the edge zone (top of image) and inner zone (bottom of image) of a Stage 4 quail blastoderm. Vimentin expression (white) is shown merged with Sytox nuclear labeling (green) at the edge of the blastoderm. A thick vimentin filament runs circumferentially (parallel to the direction of the edge) that appears to delineate the transition between the edge zone and interior zone. Also shown are dense vimentin clusters or foci, which typically appear to be closely associated with edge cell nuclei. This image appeared in a <a href=http://gtresearchnews.gatech.edu/quail-embryo/ target="_blank">March 2011 Georgia Tech news release</a>. An NIGMS grant to Professor Garcia was used to purchase the confocal microscope that collected this image. Related entries: 2808 and 2809.12/22/2020 4:28:11 PM12/22/2020 4:28:11 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified vimentin_hires    High 403 KB 6/3/2016 3:18 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Also shown are dense vimentin clusters or STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx8290https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{ECFC258C-6BEC-4C4F-9998-00CB33ACD7D8}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2430680Image showing rhabdomeres (red), the light-sensitive structures in the fruit fly retina, and rhodopsin-4 (blue), a light-sensing molecule.8/18/2020 9:04:58 PM8/18/2020 9:04:58 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Fruit_fly_retina_1    High 106 KB 6/3/2016 3:11 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx69120https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{CF24BF64-087F-46FC-883A-AF40149A41AE}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
36751099Stained kidney tissue. The kidney is an essential organ responsible for disposing wastes from the body and for maintaining healthy ion levels in the blood. It also secretes two hormones, erythropoietin (EPO) and calcitriol (a derivative of vitamin D), into the blood. It works like a purifier by pulling break-down products of metabolism, such as urea and ammonium, from the blood stream for excretion in urine. Related to image <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID=677">3725</a>. 2/4/2020 7:58:53 PM2/4/2020 7:58:53 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Slide18    High 423 KB 12/1/2020 1:07 PM Walter, Taylor (NIH/NIGMS) [C The kidney is an essential organ STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx103100https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{7EE212D2-34BF-41C9-93D3-31DA36BC0BD5}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3422749The atomic structure of the morphine biosynthetic enzyme salutaridine reductase bound to the cofactor NADPH. The substrate salutaridine is shown entering the active site.8/12/2020 6:20:42 AM8/12/2020 6:20:42 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Smith_Poppy_M    Medium 168 KB 6/3/2016 3:28 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C We have some very nice photos of opium poppy and other poppy species being studied here at STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx119340https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{F48F09D7-1529-49B4-A341-C6071BA751CC}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2329782At the root tips of the mustard plant <i>Arabidopsis thaliana</i> (red), two proteins work together to control the uptake of water and nutrients. When the cell division-promoting protein called Short-root moves from the center of the tip outward, it triggers the production of another protein (green) that confines Short-root to the nutrient-filtering endodermis. The mechanism sheds light on how genes and proteins interact in a model organism and also could inform the engineering of plants. Featured in the May 16, 2007, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/07-05-16/#1 target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.10/29/2020 2:14:03 PM10/29/2020 2:14:03 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified PlantingRoots_L    Low 5 KB 6/3/2016 3:08 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C The mechanism sheds light on how genes STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx9480https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{F8DEE475-B52B-46B2-97B6-884AD5DA433A}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
1251578Colorized scanning electron micrographs progressively zoom in on the eye of a crab larva. In the higher-resolution frames, bacteria are visible on the eye.3/13/2023 7:24:39 PM3/13/2023 7:24:39 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified crablarva-bacteria-eye_M    Medium 1262 KB 6/3/2016 2:50 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx9160https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{81E0FF0A-8C2F-4F9C-BF4E-CE157CFB3ED4}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2322591What looks like a Native American dream catcher is really a network of social interactions within a community. The red dots along the inner and outer circles represent people, while the different colored lines represent direct contact between them. All connections originate from four individuals near the center of the graph. Modeling social networks can help researchers understand how diseases spread. Featured in the July 19, 2005, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/05-07-19/#1 target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.12/20/2021 8:56:59 PM12/20/2021 8:56:59 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified modeling_disease_spread2_M    Medium 23 KB 6/3/2016 3:08 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx139180https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{1F12E63B-4E70-4853-AD74-33C85990768D}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3329739Cells move forward with lamellipodia and filopodia supported by networks and bundles of actin filaments. Proper, controlled cell movement is a complex process. Recent research has shown that an actin-polymerizing factor called the Arp2/3 complex is the key component of the actin polymerization engine that drives amoeboid cell motility. ARPC3, a component of the Arp2/3 complex, plays a critical role in actin nucleation. In this photo, the ARPC3-/- fibroblast cells were fixed and stained with Alexa 546 phalloidin for F-actin (red) Arp2 (green), and DAPI to visualize the nucleus (blue). Arp2 a subunit of the Arp2/3 complex is absent in the filopodia like structures based leading edge of ARPC3-/- fibroblasts cells. Related information available in a Stowers Institute <a href=http://www.stowers.org/media/news/apr-9-2012 target="_blank"> news release</a>. This image is part of a series of images; related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3328">image 3328</a> , <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3330">image 3330</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3331">image 3331</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3332">image 3332</a> and <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3333">image 3333</a>.12/23/2020 5:24:28 PM12/23/2020 5:24:28 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 3329_pic-2_S    Low 129 KB 3/29/2019 10:11 AM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C Arp2 a subunit of the Arp2/3 complex is STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx6060https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{17615859-F01D-43E0-99EC-C5307D347FF4}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2527882A drug's life in the body. Medicines taken by mouth pass through the liver before they are absorbed into the bloodstream. Other forms of drug administration bypass the liver, entering the blood directly. See <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=2528">image 2528</a> for a labeled version of this illustration. Featured in <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/medbydesign/ target="_blank"><i>Medicines By Design</i></a>.11/4/2021 7:07:50 PM11/4/2021 7:07:50 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified A_Drugs_Life_S    Low 102 KB 6/3/2016 3:12 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C A drug's life in the body STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx107120https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{BEA06F2F-9683-4E82-9C56-768444839212}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
68901345Microtubules (magenta) in neurons of the hippocampus, a part of the brain involved in learning and memory. Microtubules are strong, hollow fibers that provide structural support to cells. This image was captured using Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy (STORM). <Br><Br> Related to images <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6889">6889</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6891">6891</a>, and <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6892">6892</a>.4/4/2023 8:30:37 PM4/4/2023 8:30:37 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Microtubules_S    Low 27 KB 4/4/2022 10:57 AM Bigler, Abbey (NIH/NIGMS) [C Let me know if this is good or if STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx8670https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{669EF01C-7579-40A0-B4AD-BB86AF96AA93}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3736984The extracellular matrix (ECM) is most prevalent in connective tissues but also is present between the stems (axons) of nerve cells, as shown here. Blue-colored nerve cell axons are surrounded by brown-colored, myelin-supplying Schwann cells, which act like insulation around an electrical wire to help speed the transmission of electric nerve impulses down the axon. The ECM is pale pink. The tiny brown spots within it are the collagen fibers that are part of the ECM.12/17/2020 4:38:32 PM12/17/2020 4:38:32 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified myelinating_axons_L    Low 106 KB 6/3/2016 3:40 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C TEM 5: Soleus muscle ECM on the muscle surface STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx10180https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{6FE83BF5-351D-471D-BB22-F0A000BC68F5}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
25421009DNA consists of two long, twisted chains made up of nucleotides. Each nucleotide contains one base, one phosphate molecule, and the sugar molecule deoxyribose. The bases in DNA nucleotides are adenine, thymine, cytosine, and guanine. Featured in <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/thenewgenetics/ target="_blank"><i>The New Genetics</i></a>.3/4/2022 7:49:23 PM3/4/2022 7:49:23 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Nucleotides_with_labels_S    Low 69 KB 8/24/2016 5:05 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx141130https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{D1C5A0E0-9E8D-476E-BB68-F21AA185C7FA}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
7023412160Dynein (green) is a motor protein that “walks” along microtubules (red, part of the cytoskeleton) and carries its cargo along with it. This video was captured through fluorescence microscopy. 5/20/2024 1:55:04 PM5/20/2024 1:55:04 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified TIRF_motility_movie (2)    High 18389 KB 5/22/2024 2:19 PM aamershaha (NIH/NIGMS) [C It was acquired in my lab here at the STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx25250https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{3C9819B5-9560-444A-BB29-3C4FBF0844A2}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
1050634Stereo triplet of a sea urchin embryo stained to reveal actin filaments (orange) and microtubules (blue). This image is part of a series of images: <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=1047">image 1047</a> , <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=1048">image 1048</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=1049">image 1049</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=1051">image 1051</a> and <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=1052">image 1052</a>.8/14/2020 6:05:27 PM8/14/2020 6:05:27 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified triplet6_S    Low 8 KB 9/8/2016 2:16 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C Stereo triplet of a sea urchin embryo STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx6660https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{47B823DA-62D8-42C2-A17D-8080F6BFCB34}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2752848A spore from the bacterium <i>Bacillus subtilis</i> shows four outer layers that protect the cell from harsh environmental conditions.8/21/2020 5:58:25 PM8/21/2020 5:58:25 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Spore    High 42 KB 6/3/2016 3:17 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Spore_L    Low 9 KB 6/3/2016 3:17 PM STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx5370https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{DE29F2D0-83D8-463F-A2A1-AC626985A52B}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131