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2411372Crystals of fungal lipase protein created for X-ray crystallography, which can reveal detailed, three-dimensional protein structures.8/6/2020 7:42:01 PM8/6/2020 7:42:01 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified f07N_fungal_lipase1_S    Low 30 KB 9/7/2016 3:39 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{00CC22CD-D661-4A46-B76C-2BF83B279865}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2412373Crystals of porcine alpha amylase protein created for X-ray crystallography, which can reveal detailed, three-dimensional protein structures.8/6/2020 7:43:47 PM8/6/2020 7:43:47 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified f07Q_pig_alpha_amylase1_S    Low 42 KB 9/7/2016 3:41 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{E9F19A73-FA71-493E-8C7D-9B1B2ADB206F}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2413374A crystal of porcine trypsin protein created for X-ray crystallography, which can reveal detailed, three-dimensional protein structures.8/6/2020 7:45:47 PM8/6/2020 7:45:47 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified f07S_pig_trypsin1_S    Low 32 KB 9/7/2016 3:42 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{62D6C832-61B1-433F-9F03-CBC6AD58F57F}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2414375Crystals of porcine trypsin protein created for X-ray crystallography, which can reveal detailed, three-dimensional protein structures.8/6/2020 7:47:17 PM8/6/2020 7:47:17 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified f07T_pig_trypsin1_S    Low 50 KB 9/7/2016 3:44 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{F1BA04F3-477F-425A-BBA0-8AD337F3E1E8}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2417376This fruit fly expresses green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the same pattern as the period gene, a gene that regulates circadian rhythm and is expressed in all sensory neurons on the surface of the fly.8/6/2020 7:51:34 PM8/6/2020 7:51:34 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified FlybyNight1_S    Low 11 KB 9/7/2016 5:33 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{03C5A6E6-05E4-4B1A-884E-53940CDDCD3D}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2418377This delicate, birdlike projection is an immature seed of the <i>Arabidopsis</i> plant. The part in blue shows the cell that gives rise to the endosperm, the tissue that nourishes the embryo. The cell is expressing only the maternal copy of a gene called MEDEA. This phenomenon, in which the activity of a gene can depend on the parent that contributed it, is called genetic imprinting. In <i>Arabidopsis</i>, the maternal copy of MEDEA makes a protein that keeps the paternal copy silent and reduces the size of the endosperm. In flowering plants and mammals, this sort of genetic imprinting is thought to be a way for the mother to protect herself by limiting the resources she gives to any one embryo. Featured in the May 16, 2006, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/06-05-16/#1 target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.8/17/2020 7:59:57 PM8/17/2020 7:59:57 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified genetic_imprinting_T    Thumbnail 4 KB 6/3/2016 3:10 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C In flowering plants and mammals, this sort of genetic imprinting is thought to be a way for STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{755171FE-A0AC-4D55-8F76-BC6554F6076A}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2419378This image of the human brain uses colors and shapes to show neurological differences between two people. The blurred front portion of the brain, associated with complex thought, varies most between the individuals. The blue ovals mark areas of basic function that vary relatively little. Visualizations like this one are part of a project to map complex and dynamic information about the human brain, including genes, enzymes, disease states, and anatomy. The brain maps represent collaborations between neuroscientists and experts in math, statistics, computer science, bioinformatics, imaging, and nanotechnology. Featured in the October 18, 2005, issue of <a href="http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/05-10-18/#1" target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.5/12/2021 8:58:25 PM5/12/2021 8:58:25 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Brain_map_M    Medium 67 KB 6/3/2016 3:10 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C This image of the human brain uses STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{B082809A-5B3D-4BD2-B182-2FFDA2EBAE5B}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2423379Network diagram showing a map of protein-protein interactions in a yeast (<i>Saccharomyces cerevisiae</i>) cell. This cluster includes 78 percent of the proteins in the yeast proteome. The color of a node represents the phenotypic effect of removing the corresponding protein (red, lethal; green, nonlethal; orange, slow growth; yellow, unknown).8/17/2020 9:20:50 PM8/17/2020 9:20:50 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified protein_map182_T    Thumbnail 10 KB 6/3/2016 3:10 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C I'm more than happy to allow STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{F93DC033-4F3F-4368-8211-AD3F2769B90F}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3413380X-ray co-crystal structure of Src kinase bound to a DNA-templated macrocycle inhibitor. Found in the journal, Nature, Chemical Biology 8, 366-374 (2012). Series of seven images. Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3414">image 3414</a> , <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3415">image 3415</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3416">image 3416</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3417">image 3417</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3418">image 3418</a> and <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3419">image 3419</a>.12/23/2020 11:02:46 PM12/23/2020 11:02:46 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified macrocycle4b_copy_M    Medium 66 KB 6/3/2016 3:28 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C WE are happy to give you STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{082D0675-FCFD-4E1E-9ECB-FE9441E456BA}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3414381X-ray co-crystal structure of Src kinase bound to a DNA-templated macrocycle inhibitor. Found in the journal, Nature, Chemical Biology 8, 366-374 (2012). Series of seven images. Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3413">image 3413</a> , <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3415">image 3415</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3416">image 3416</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3417">image 3417</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3418">image 3418</a> and <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3419">image 3419</a>.12/23/2020 11:04:41 PM12/23/2020 11:04:41 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified binding_site_of_Src_kinase_for_macrocycle_inhibitors    High 375 KB 6/3/2016 3:28 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{FC3B2E45-4B75-43F5-AB53-B66E4E536897}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3415382X-ray co-crystal structure of Src kinase bound to a DNA-templated macrocycle inhibitor. Found in the journal, Nature, Chemical Biology 8, 366-374 (2012). Series of seven images. Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3413">image 3413</a> , <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3414">image 3414</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3416">image 3416</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3417">image 3417</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3418">image 3418</a> and <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3419">image 3419</a>.12/23/2020 11:07:01 PM12/23/2020 11:07:01 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Src_kinase_in_complex_with_macrocycle4b_copy_M    Medium 95 KB 6/3/2016 3:28 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{BAF7CEA2-E05B-4260-AA04-C2DA7BA3228A}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3416383X-ray co-crystal structure of Src kinase bound to a DNA-templated macrocycle inhibitor. Found in the journal, Nature, Chemical Biology 8, 366-374 (2012). Series of seven images. Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3413">image 3413</a> , <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3414">image 3414</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3415">image 3415</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3417">image 3417</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3418">image 3418</a> and <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3419">image 3419</a>.12/23/2020 11:08:36 PM12/23/2020 11:08:36 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified image_2    Thumbnail 20 KB 6/3/2016 3:28 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Hi Alisa, I have submitted the grant STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{4AE56C0B-1545-4D0A-997E-59755F61D8EE}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3417384X-ray co-crystal structure of Src kinase bound to a DNA-templated macrocycle inhibitor. Found in the journal, Nature, Chemical Biology 8, 366-374 (2012). Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3413">image 3413</a> , <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3414">image 3414</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3415">image 3415</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3416">image 3416</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3418">image 3418</a> and <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3419">image 3419</a>.12/23/2020 11:12:30 PM12/23/2020 11:12:30 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified image3_M    Medium 106 KB 6/3/2016 3:28 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{216ADE51-44AC-4706-8E52-63EB7D76C69C}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3418385X-ray co-crystal structure of Src kinase bound to a DNA-templated macrocycle inhibitor. Found in the journal, Nature, Chemical Biology 8, 366-374 (2012). <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3413">image 3413</a> , <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3414">image 3414</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3415">image 3415</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3416">image 3416</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3417">image 3417</a> and <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3419">image 3419</a>.12/23/2020 11:12:00 PM12/23/2020 11:12:00 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified macrocycle4b_stick_representation    High 349 KB 6/3/2016 3:28 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{151298FF-60F5-42C1-8AA6-94F7FD3186DD}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3419386X-ray co-crystal structure of Src kinase bound to a DNA-templated macrocycle inhibitor. Found in the journal, Nature, Chemical Biology 8, 366-374 (2012). Part of an image series: <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3413">image 3413</a> , <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3414">image 3414</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3415">image 3415</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3416">image 3416</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3417">image 3417</a> and <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3418">image 3418</a>.12/23/2020 11:13:50 PM12/23/2020 11:13:50 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified macrocylcle4b_balls_stick_3color_M    Medium 89 KB 6/3/2016 3:28 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{BACDE248-1F0A-40F9-80C2-B23609B91078}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3421387Some children are born with a mutation in a regulatory site on this enzyme that causes them to over-secrete insulin when they consume protein. We found that a compound from green tea (shown in the stick figure and by the yellow spheres on the enzyme) is able to block this hyperactivity when given to animals with this disorder.8/12/2020 5:55:18 AM8/12/2020 5:55:18 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Smith_Green_Tea_M    Medium 337 KB 6/3/2016 3:28 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Record of permission to use both of these: Hello Dr. Machalek, I am writing in response to a request from Dr STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{E483CD08-3B80-435E-AA0D-C99D7F88A233}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6519388During cell division, cells physically divide after separating their genetic material to create two daughter cells that are genetically identical to the parent cell. This process is important so that new cells can grow and develop. In this image, a human fibroblast cell—a type of connective tissue cell that plays a key role in wound healing and tissue repair—is dividing into two daughter cells. A cell protein called actin appears gray, the myosin II (part of the family of motor proteins responsible for muscle contractions) appears green, and DNA appears magenta. 12/22/2020 4:11:34 PM12/22/2020 4:11:34 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Fibroblast Division_HIghRes    High 3066 KB 11/6/2019 10:20 AM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{D58E532F-7578-4EC5-8E98-64840654F119}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6520389Here, a human HeLa cell (a type of immortal cell line used in laboratory experiments) is undergoing cell division. They come from cervical cancer cells that were obtained in 1951 from Henrietta Lacks, a patient at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. The final stage of division, called cytokinesis, occurs after the genomes—shown in yellow—have split into two new daughter cells. The myosin II is a motor protein shown in blue, and the actin filaments, which are types of protein that support cell structure, are shown in red. Read more about <a href="https://directorsblog.nih.gov/2013/08/07/hela-cells-a-new-chapter-in-an-enduring-story/">NIH and the Lacks family</a>.12/21/2020 7:39:25 PM12/21/2020 7:39:25 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Read more about <a href="https://directorsblog.nih.gov/2013/08/07/hela-cells-a-new-chapter-in-an-enduring-story STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{BE87B9BE-366C-4432-8538-8F3B807C2AE0}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6521390This skyline of New York City was created by “printing” nanodroplets containing yeast (<i>Saccharomyces cerevisiae</i>) onto a large plate. Each dot is a separate yeast colony. As the colonies grew, a picture emerged, creating art. To make the different colors shown here, yeast strains were genetically engineered to produce pigments naturally made by bacteria, fungi, and sea creatures such as coral and sea anemones. Using genes from other organisms to make biological compounds paves the way toward harnessing yeast in the production of other useful molecules, from food to fuels and drugs.12/22/2020 4:10:18 PM12/22/2020 4:10:18 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified NYC Skyline, FASEB winner_HIghRes    High 2636 KB 11/6/2019 10:14 AM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{7761567D-1F40-428F-B2A5-DC64D0AEB797}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6522391In this image of a stained fruit fly ovary, the ovary is packed with immature eggs (with DNA stained blue). The cytoskeleton (in pink) is a collection of fibers that gives a cell shape and support. The signal-transmitting molecules like STAT (in yellow) are common to reproductive processes in humans. Researchers used this image to show molecular staining and high-resolution imaging techniques to students.12/22/2020 4:09:49 PM12/22/2020 4:09:49 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Fly ovaries-1_STAT-Actin-DAPI-Rogers1-option 1_M    Medium 112 KB 10/30/2019 10:01 AM Varkala, Venkat (NIH STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{5962F18A-BC93-49A3-8D72-59B68D5AD8DE}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6532392In the worm <i>C. elegans</i>, double-stranded RNA made in neurons can silence matching genes in a variety of cell types through the transport of RNA between cells. The head region of three worms that were genetically modified to express a fluorescent protein were imaged and the images were color-coded based on depth. The worm on the left lacks neuronal double-stranded RNA and thus every cell is fluorescent. In the middle worm, the expression of the fluorescent protein is silenced by neuronal double-stranded RNA and thus most cells are not fluorescent. The worm on the right lacks an enzyme that amplifies RNA for silencing. Surprisingly, the identities of the cells that depend on this enzyme for gene silencing are unpredictable. As a result, worms of identical genotype are nevertheless random mosaics for how the function of gene silencing is carried out. For more, see <a href="https://academic.oup.com/nar/article/47/19/10059/5563947">journal article</a> and <a href="https://umdrightnow.umd.edu/news/umd-scientists-discover-hidden-differences-may-help-cells-evade-drug-therapy">press release.</a> Related to image <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6534">6534</a>.12/21/2020 7:45:16 PM12/21/2020 7:45:16 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified The_Three_Pharingos_4_flipped_Thumbnail    Thumbnail 94 KB 12/17/2019 2:28 PM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{818BAE61-BA6A-412E-9A1A-F5BEE4D08EA6}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6534393In the worm <i>C. elegans</i>, double-stranded RNA made in neurons can silence matching genes in a variety of cell types through the transport of RNA between cells. The head region of three worms that were genetically modified to express a fluorescent protein were imaged and the images were color-coded based on depth. The worm on the left lacks neuronal double-stranded RNA and thus every cell is fluorescent. In the middle worm, the expression of the fluorescent protein is silenced by neuronal double-stranded RNA and thus most cells are not fluorescent. The worm on the right lacks an enzyme that amplifies RNA for silencing. Surprisingly, the identities of the cells that depend on this enzyme for gene silencing are unpredictable. As a result, worms of identical genotype are nevertheless random mosaics for how the function of gene silencing is carried out. For more, see <a href="https://academic.oup.com/nar/article/47/19/10059/5563947">journal article</a> and <a href="https://umdrightnow.umd.edu/news/umd-scientists-discover-hidden-differences-may-help-cells-evade-drug-therapy">press release.</a> Related to image <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6532">6532</a>.12/21/2020 7:47:07 PM12/21/2020 7:47:07 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified The_Three_Pharingos_16colored_Thumbnail    Thumbnail 91 KB 12/17/2019 2:58 PM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{41A91E05-BA3D-46C3-9B56-0838552A4F30}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6535394Kupffer cells appear in the liver during the early stages of mammalian development and stay put throughout life to protect liver cells, clean up old red blood cells, and regulate iron levels. Source article <a href="https://directorsblog.nih.gov/2019/12/12/replenishing-the-livers-immune-protections/">Replenishing the Liver’s Immune Protections</a>. Posted on December 12th, 2019 by Dr. Francis Collins.12/21/2020 7:51:16 PM12/21/2020 7:51:16 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Kupffer_cell_in_liver-1_NCMIR_thumbnail    Thumbnail 118 KB 12/18/2019 1:38 PM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{3A1E4A5A-E2A1-4267-A145-D69C64F52A7A}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6536395Sepsis is the body’s overactive and extreme response to an infection. More than 1.7 million people get sepsis each year in the United States. Without prompt treatment, sepsis can lead to tissue damage, organ failure, and death. Many NIGMS-supported researchers are working to improve sepsis diagnosis and treatment. Learn more with our <a href="https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/Pages/factsheet_sepsis.aspx"> sepsis fact sheet</a>. <br><br> See <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6551">6551</a> for the Spanish version of this infographic. 1/26/2022 3:33:16 PM1/26/2022 3:33:16 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Sepsis-508_m    Medium 339 KB 9/23/2020 4:12 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{C1831FC8-0317-491C-987F-6CC9D97A7609}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2434396Section of a fruit fly retina showing the light-sensing molecules rhodopsin-5 (blue) and rhodopsin-6 (red).8/18/2020 9:34:37 PM8/18/2020 9:34:37 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Fruit_fly_retina_2    High 92 KB 6/3/2016 3:11 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{76D06FB1-3EF4-4960-ADE3-3B9AA3122948}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2435397The glial cells (black dots) and nerve cells (brown bands) in this developing fruit fly nerve cord formed normally despite the absence of the SPITZ protein, which blocks their impending suicide. The HID protein, which triggers suicide, is also lacking in this embryo.8/19/2020 4:24:57 PM8/19/2020 4:24:57 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Developing_fruit_fly_nerve_cord_M    Medium 12 KB 6/3/2016 3:11 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{DF2ABB73-C6AA-445B-9DE5-B16A7830BDE9}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2437398<i>Hydra magnipapillata</i> is an invertebrate animal used as a model organism to study developmental questions, for example the formation of the body axis.8/11/2022 11:56:55 PM8/11/2022 11:56:55 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified D20_2920-2_M    Medium 192 KB 6/3/2016 3:11 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C I sent the images for that purpose STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{726F855D-7FB8-461A-B0E6-151F3FDBCD2B}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2438399<i>Hydra magnipapillata</i> is an invertebrate animal used as a model organism to study developmental questions, for example the formation of the body axis.8/19/2020 2:57:58 PM8/19/2020 2:57:58 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified D20_2921-2    High 1545 KB 6/3/2016 3:11 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C I sent the images for that purpose STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{6730514F-C4E7-47BE-9D58-176F790A5EED}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2439400<i>Hydra magnipapillata</i> is an invertebrate animal used as a model organism to study developmental questions, for example the formation of the body axis.8/19/2020 2:56:50 PM8/19/2020 2:56:50 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified D20_2925-2_L    Low 54 KB 6/3/2016 3:11 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C I sent the images for that purpose STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{3E508158-607A-4F26-8ABD-D1325D56C6FC}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2440401<i>Hydra magnipapillata</i> is an invertebrate animal used as a model organism to study developmental questions, for example the formation of the body axis.8/19/2020 2:54:54 PM8/19/2020 2:54:54 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified D20_2927-2    High 1343 KB 6/3/2016 3:11 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C I sent the images for that purpose STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{81E5497C-2A45-458C-9236-23A11648E56E}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2441402<i>Hydra magnipapillata</i> is an invertebrate animal used as a model organism to study developmental questions, for example the formation of the body axis.7/20/2021 2:20:35 PM7/20/2021 2:20:35 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified D20_2931-2    High 416 KB 6/3/2016 3:11 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C I sent the images for that purpose STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{DA359322-34AC-40B3-98FF-849B276875E9}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2442403<i>Hydra magnipapillata</i> is an invertebrate animal used as a model organism to study developmental questions, for example the formation of the body axis.8/19/2020 2:52:08 PM8/19/2020 2:52:08 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified D20_2932-2    High 588 KB 6/3/2016 3:11 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C I sent the images for that purpose STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{AFEC3CCF-4521-4FBE-B588-7EF06ED5D31B}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3432404Shortly after a pregnant woman gives birth, her breasts start to secrete milk. This process is triggered by hormonal and genetic cues, including the protein Elf5. Scientists discovered that Elf5 also has another job--it staves off cancer. Early in the development of breast cancer, human breast cells often lose Elf5 proteins. Cells without Elf5 change shape and spread readily--properties associated with metastasis. This image shows cells in the mouse mammary gland that are lacking Elf5, leading to the overproduction of other proteins (red) that increase the likelihood of metastasis.8/22/2020 4:13:22 PM8/22/2020 4:13:22 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Rumela_300dpi    Other 12314 KB 9/26/2020 10:32 PM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{21A2AB31-1A11-45C6-9FDA-9C8EF7162120}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3434405Influenza (flu) virus proteins in the act of self-replication. Viral nucleoprotein (blue) encapsidates [encapsulates] the RNA genome (green). The influenza virus polymerase (orange) reads and copies the RNA genome. In the background is an image of influenza virus ribonucleoprotein complexes observed using cryo-electron microscopy. This image is from a November 2012 <a href=http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2012-11/sri-sri112012.php target="blank"> <em>News Release</em></a>.8/22/2020 4:28:48 PM8/22/2020 4:28:48 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Flu_virus_proteins__M    Medium 111 KB 6/3/2016 3:29 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{77F0053D-8191-4175-9D50-055CE49F083C}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3436406This image shows the hierarchical ontology of genes, cellular components and processes derived from large genomic datasets. From Dutkowski et al. <a href= "http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23242164" target="_blank">A gene ontology inferred from molecular networks </a>Nat Biotechnol. 2013 Jan;31(1):38-45. Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3437">image 3437</a>.8/22/2020 4:38:22 PM8/22/2020 4:38:22 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified nexo_image_300dpi_no_text_T    Thumbnail 4 KB 6/3/2016 3:29 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{7D6D8D19-27F0-4C24-82CC-9AD3D499FA8A}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3437407This image shows the hierarchical ontology of genes, cellular components and processes derived from large genomic datasets. From Dutkowski et al. <a href= "http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23242164" target="_blank">A gene ontology inferred from molecular networks </a>Nat Biotechnol. 2013 Jan;31(1):38-45. Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3436">image 3436</a>.8/22/2020 4:42:01 PM8/22/2020 4:42:01 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified NeXO_300dpi_L    Low 69 KB 6/3/2016 3:29 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C From Dutkowski et al. <a href STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{18E1FF8B-85D6-4F50-B7CE-4ED55E15A013}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3438408The chemical structure of the morphine molecule8/22/2020 4:44:39 PM8/22/2020 4:44:39 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Morphine_structure_M    Medium 57 KB 6/3/2016 3:29 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Toni M. Kutchan and R. Howard STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{6EE205B7-C53B-4A56-B1E5-DB767CF5273F}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3440409During embryonic development, transcription factors (proteins that regulate gene expression) govern the differentiation of cells into separate tissues and organs. Researchers at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center used mice to study the development of certain internal organs, including the liver, pancreas, duodenum (beginning part of the small intestine), gall bladder and bile ducts. They discovered that transcription factor Sox17 guides some cells to develop into liver cells and others to become part of the pancreas or biliary system (gall bladder, bile ducts and associated structures). The separation of these two distinct cell types (liver versus pancreas/biliary system) is complete by embryonic day 8.5 in mice. The transcription factors PDX1 and Hes1 are also known to be involved in embryonic development of the pancreas and biliary system. This image shows mouse cells at embryonic day 10.5. The green areas show cells that will develop into the pancreas and/or duodenum(PDX1 is labeled green). The blue area near the bottom will become the gall bladder and the connecting tubes (common duct and cystic duct) that attach the gall bladder to the liver and pancreas (Sox17 is labeled blue). The transcription factor Hes1 is labeled red. The image was not published. A similar image (different plane of the section) was published in: <b>Sox17 Regulates Organ Lineage Segregation of Ventral Foregut Progenitor Cells</b> Jason R. Spence, Alex W. Lange, Suh-Chin J. Lin, Klaus H. Kaestner, Andrew M. Lowy, Injune Kim, Jeffrey A. Whitsett and James M. Wells, Developmental Cell, Volume 17, Issue 1, 62-74, 21 July 2009. doi:10.1016/j.devcel.2009.05.0128/22/2020 5:03:27 PM8/22/2020 5:03:27 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified e10-5_sox_hes_pdx    Other 26400 KB 9/26/2020 10:34 PM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C If so, and if it?s not STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{82850322-6E67-4E74-9AB5-AA92C974E1F0}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3442410These images show three stages of cell division in Xenopus XL177 cells, which are derived from tadpole epithelial cells. They are (from top): metaphase, anaphase and telophase. The microtubules are green and the chromosomes are blue. Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3443">image 3443</a>.8/22/2020 5:25:02 PM8/22/2020 5:25:02 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified mitotic1_M    Medium 94 KB 6/3/2016 3:29 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C These images show three stages of cell division in Xenopus XL177 cells, which are derived from tadpole STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{385F83B3-C956-487B-9A75-4C353F0A940E}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3443411These images show frog cells in interphase. The cells are Xenopus XL177 cells, which are derived from tadpole epithelial cells. The microtubules are green and the chromosomes are blue. Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3442">image 3442</a>.8/22/2020 5:30:27 PM8/22/2020 5:30:27 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified interphs_M    Medium 225 KB 6/3/2016 3:29 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C The microtubules are green and the STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{5CE69473-3A28-4887-B8C1-AA71A16B23A9}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6551412La sepsis o septicemia es la respuesta fulminante y extrema del cuerpo a una infección. En los Estados Unidos, más de 1.7 millones de personas contraen sepsis cada año. Sin un tratamiento rápido, la sepsis puede provocar daño de los tejidos, insuficiencia orgánica y muerte. El NIGMS apoya a muchos investigadores en su trabajo para mejorar el diagnóstico y el tratamiento de la sepsis. Obtenga más información con nuestra hoja informativa sobre la sepsis. Aprenda más con nuestra hoja <a href="https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/fact-sheets/Pages/sepsis-spanish.aspx">informativa sobre la sepsis</a>.<br> <br> Vea <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6536">6536</a> para la versión en inglés de esta infografía. 3/24/2020 6:35:36 PM3/24/2020 6:35:36 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Sepsis_030920_Esp_thumb    Thumbnail 207 KB 3/20/2020 6:41 PM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{402B4C80-3489-4EAA-B13F-17D1DA962FFB}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6553413Floral pattern emerging as two bacterial species, motile <i>Acinetobacter baylyi</i> (red) and non-motile <i>Escherichia coli</i> (green), are grown together for 48 hours on 1% agar surface from a small inoculum in the center of a Petri dish. <br><br> See <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6557">6557</a> for a photo of this process at 24 hours on 0.75% agar surface. <br> See <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6555">6555</a> for another photo of this process at 48 hours on 1% agar surface. <br> See <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6556">6556</a> for a photo of this process at 72 hours on 0.5% agar surface.<br> See <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6550">6550</a> for a video of this process.12/21/2020 8:13:21 PM12/21/2020 8:13:21 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified v_1200_LowRes    Low 108 KB 3/23/2020 10:52 AM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C Floral pattern in a mixture of STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{6856F041-1361-4783-9B60-D14068A564E4}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6555414Floral pattern emerging as two bacterial species, motile <i>Acinetobacter baylyi</i> (red) and non-motile <i>Escherichia coli</i> (green), are grown together for 48 hours on 1% agar surface from a small inoculum in the center of a Petri dish. <br><br> See <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6557">6557</a> for a photo of this process at 24 hours on 0.75% agar surface. <br> See <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6553">6553</a> for another photo of this process at 48 hours on 1% agar surface. <br> See <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6556">6556</a> for a photo of this process at 72 hours on 0.5% agar surface. <br> See <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6550">6550</a> for a video of this process.12/21/2020 8:15:42 PM12/21/2020 8:15:42 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified AnEspec2a_Thumb    Thumbnail 80 KB 3/23/2020 11:04 AM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{53BB1AC9-C210-41F3-AFCE-D486FB2F4E8D}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6556415Floral pattern emerging as two bacterial species, motile <i>Acinetobacter baylyi</i> and non-motile <i>Escherichia coli</i> (green), are grown together for 72 hours on 0.5% agar surface from a small inoculum in the center of a Petri dish. <br><br> See <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6557">6557</a> for a photo of this process at 24 hours on 0.75% agar surface. <br> See <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6553">6553</a> for a photo of this process at 48 hours on 1% agar surface. <br> See <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6555">6555</a> for another photo of this process at 48 hours on 1% agar surface.<br> See <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6550">6550</a> for a video of this process.12/21/2020 8:20:40 PM12/21/2020 8:20:40 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Fig1A_Thumb    Thumbnail 133 KB 3/23/2020 11:18 AM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C L. Xiong et al, eLife 2020;9 STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{650BA99B-A3DA-470B-AE76-FF69E44D891B}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6557416Floral pattern emerging as two bacterial species, motile <i>Acinetobacter baylyi</i> and non-motile <i>Escherichia coli</i> (green), are grown together for 24 hours on 0.75% agar surface from a small inoculum in the center of a Petri dish. <br><br> See <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6553">6553</a> for a photo of this process at 48 hours on 1% agar surface. <br> See <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6555">6555</a> for another photo of this process at 48 hours on 1% agar surface.<br> See <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6556">6556</a> for a photo of this process at 72 hours on 0.5% agar surface. <br> See <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6550">6550</a> for a video of this process.12/21/2020 8:21:34 PM12/21/2020 8:21:34 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Q1190217rgb1_Thumb    Thumbnail 98 KB 3/23/2020 11:50 AM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{5C7A3D81-578C-4736-A690-6B71A7F2C2B4}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6562417Actin gliding powered by myosin 1D. Note the counterclockwise motion of the gliding actin filaments.12/22/2020 3:23:24 PM12/22/2020 3:23:24 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified actin-moviegif2 (2)    High 1961 KB 3/3/2021 10:19 AM Walter, Taylor (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{C5C38D11-D0A4-45FB-AE41-284858764094}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6568418These images illustrate a technique combining cryo-electron tomography and super-resolution fluorescence microscopy called correlative imaging by annotation with single molecules (CIASM). CIASM enables researchers to identify small structures and individual molecules in cells that they couldn’t using older techniques. 12/22/2020 3:22:47 PM12/22/2020 3:22:47 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Figure_2_72dpi    Thumbnail 63 KB 7/16/2020 3:27 PM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{93F7C98F-C6A0-4FA2-A019-AA17C2A1B17F}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
65694193D image of <i>Caulobacter</i> bacterium with various components highlighted: cell membranes (red and blue), protein shell (green), protein factories known as ribosomes (yellow), and storage granules (orange). 12/22/2020 3:22:13 PM12/22/2020 3:22:13 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified cryo_em_caulobacter_thumb    Thumbnail 46 KB 7/16/2020 4:42 PM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{1F5C58D5-5216-4E76-AE82-A401F16B64DB}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2457420Novel biosensor system maps the timing and location of Rac protein activation in a living mouse embryo fibroblast.8/20/2020 6:22:04 PM8/20/2020 6:22:04 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified RAC1_activation_in_motile_fibroblast    High 627 KB 6/28/2016 3:00 PM Hall, Monique (NIH/NCI) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{B0808E7F-84F4-4D3E-A355-D7F70A509103}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2473421Sugars light up the cells in this jaw of a 3-day-old zebrafish embryo and highlight a scientific first: labeling and tracking the movements of sugar chains called glycans in a living organism. Here, recently produced glycans (red) are on the cell surface while those made earlier in development (green) have migrated into the cells. In some areas, old and new glycans mingle (yellow). A better understanding of such traffic patterns could shed light on how organisms develop and may uncover markers for disease, such as cancer. Featured in the May 21, 2008 of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/08-05-21/index.html#1 target="_blank"><i>Biomedical Beat</i></a>.8/21/2020 9:08:18 PM8/21/2020 9:08:18 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified glowing_glycan_S    Low 32 KB 9/13/2016 4:09 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C Sugars light up the cells in STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{B91060A2-F13B-4A09-BD5C-3BE494CB9E7B}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131