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2325594In 2006, scientists developed an optical microscopy technique enabling them to clearly see individual molecules within cells. In 2007, they took the technique, abbreviated STORM, a step further. They identified multicolored probes that let them peer into cells and clearly see multiple cellular components at the same time, such as these microtubules (green) and small hollows called clathrin-coated pits (red). Unlike conventional methods, the multicolor STORM technique produces a crisp and high resolution picture. A sharper view of how cellular components interact will likely help scientists answer some longstanding questions about cell biology. Featured in the October 17, 2007, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/07-10-17/#1 target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.10/29/2020 2:02:16 PM10/29/2020 2:02:16 PMIn 2006, scientists developed an optical microscopy technique enabling them to clearly see individual molecules within Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx99110https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{76D31C7C-D8E7-4BC2-BCAB-8D4B7465DE4F}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
65681272These images illustrate a technique combining cryo-electron tomography and super-resolution fluorescence microscopy called correlative imaging by annotation with single molecules (CIASM). CIASM enables researchers to identify small structures and individual molecules in cells that they couldn’t using older techniques. 12/22/2020 3:22:47 PM12/22/2020 3:22:47 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Figure_2_72dpi    Thumbnail 63 KB 7/16/2020 3:27 PM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx8350https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{93F7C98F-C6A0-4FA2-A019-AA17C2A1B17F}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
67901290Two cells over a 2-hour period. The one on the bottom left goes through programmed cell death, also known as apoptosis. The one on the top right goes through cell division, also called mitosis. This video was captured using a confocal microscope. 12/27/2021 4:57:37 PM12/27/2021 4:57:37 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Technique: Structured Illumination Microscopy (SIM) Video: DNA during cell death and Technique: Confocal STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx10280https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{CC8B5303-F2D9-4014-B9B9-68597C41C367}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
5793999What looks like the gossamer wings of a butterfly is actually the retina of a mouse, delicately snipped to lay flat and sparkling with fluorescent molecules. The image is from a research project investigating the promise of gene therapy for glaucoma. It was created at an NIGMS-funded advanced microscopy facility that develops technology for imaging across many scales, from whole organisms to cells to individual molecules. <BR><BR> The ability to obtain high-resolution imaging of tissue as large as whole mouse retinas was made possible by a technique called large-scale mosaic confocal microscopy, which was pioneered by the NIGMS-funded National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research. The technique is similar to Google Earth in that it computationally stitches together many small, high-resolution images. <BR><BR> More details: <BR><BR> Glaucoma is a progressive eye disease and the leading cause of irreversible blindness. It is characterized by the death of neurons in the retina called retinal ganglion cells. A number of studies over the past decade suggest that targeting these cells with gene therapy designed to prevent their death might slow the progression of glaucoma. <BR><BR> This study is investigating whether a non-disease-causing virus (adeno-associated virus serotype 2) can effectively deliver genes to retinal ganglion cells. The researchers introduced into the virus a gene for green fluorescent protein (GFP) so they could visualize how well the virus transduced the cells. <BR><BR> Two months after viral delivery of the fluorescent vector to the eyes of 7-month-old mice, the researchers examined the entire retinas of the subjects under a microscope. The ability to obtain high-resolution imaging of tissue as large as whole mouse retinas was made possible by a technique called large-scale mosaic confocal microscopy, which was pioneered by the NIGMS-funded National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research. The technique is similar to Google Earth in that it computationally stitches together many small, high-resolution images. <BR><BR> The researchers observed GFP expression (yellow) in all parts of the retinal ganglion cells (blue), including the soma, axons and dendritic tree. These results suggest that a viral delivery system could deliver therapeutic genes to retinal ganglion cells for treating glaucoma and related diseases. <BR><BR> EQUIPMENT: Olympus FluoView™ FV1000 Confocal Microscope. Fluorophores: green fluorescent protein and Alexa Fluor 568. Non-glaucomatous DBA/2J-Gpnmb+ mice. <BR><BR> Reflecting on the work, the lead researcher [Keunyoung (“Christine”) Kim] says: “It is amazing to see intricate and artistically organized microscopic structures. … I encountered an entirely new world invisible to the naked eye—a galaxy of infinite secrets and endless potential for discovery.” 7/19/2023 8:25:17 PM7/19/2023 8:25:17 PMby a technique called large-scale mosaic confocal microscopy, which was pioneered by the The technique is similar to Google Earth in that it computationally stitches together many STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx9570https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{E2CC74AB-01A0-4BBC-964B-CF278FF727BA}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
701013244An adult Hawaiian bobtail squid, <em>Euprymna scolopes</em>, (~4 cm) surrounded by newly hatched juveniles (~2 mm) in a bowl of seawater. <Br><Br>Related to image <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=7011">7011</a> and video <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=7012">7012</a>. 4/5/2024 7:52:37 PM4/5/2024 7:52:37 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified This material is free of copyright restrictions The labs of Margaret J. McFall-Ngai, Carnegie Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx4450https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{F177861B-8657-49C6-9CBA-1788EB46014A}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
67891289Two mouse fibroblasts, one of the most common types of cells in mammalian connective tissue. They play a key role in wound healing and tissue repair. This image was captured using structured illumination microscopy. 12/27/2021 4:20:11 PM12/27/2021 4:20:11 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Technique: Structured Illumination Microscopy (SIM) Video: DNA during cell death and Technique: Confocal STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx10290https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{911FF0EB-C528-450C-93F7-22CEEFA45FCF}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3556956Luciferase-based imaging enables visualization and quantification of internal organs and transplanted cells in live adult zebrafish. In this image, a cardiac muscle-restricted promoter drives firefly luciferase expression. Lateral (Top) and overhead views (Bottom) are shown.10/5/2020 5:20:22 AM10/5/2020 5:20:22 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Poss-zebrafish-01    High 416 KB 6/3/2016 3:31 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C br>For imagery of the overhead STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx102110https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{3D1F01B8-728A-4F3D-B381-CF2B50DEAA2C}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3600963A mouse's fat cells (red) are shown surrounded by a network of blood vessels (green). Fat cells store and release energy, protect organs and nerve tissues, insulate us from the cold and help us absorb important vitamins. This image is part of the Life: Magnified collection, which was displayed in the Gateway Gallery at Washington Dulles International Airport June 3, 2014, to January 21, 2015. To see all 46 images in this exhibit, go to https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/life-magnified/Pages/default.aspx.11/22/2022 8:43:42 PM11/22/2022 8:43:42 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 7_right_Fat_cells_and_blood_vessel_34in_Malide_H    High 4848 KB 10/19/2020 3:10 AM Harris, Donald (NIH STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx8670https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{F5343960-E864-40C3-A794-C1F7F1C9CD4F}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
35801158Industrious V. cholerae bacteria (yellow) tend to thrive in denser biofilms (left) while moochers (red) thrive in weaker biofilms (right). More information about the research behind this image can be found in a <a href="http://biobeat.nigms.nih.gov/2014/02/cool-image-denying-microbial-moochers/">Biomedical Beat Blog posting</a> from February 2014.10/5/2020 6:16:25 AM10/5/2020 6:16:25 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified V_M._cholerae_biofilms_32    Medium 50 KB 6/3/2016 3:32 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx8050https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{21F937D8-3F14-4784-AC98-9E76BB4A34A8}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
5772994Ovarioles in female insects are tubes in which egg cells (called oocytes) form at one end and complete their development as they reach the other end of the tube. This image, taken with a confocal microscope, shows ovarioles in a very popular lab animal, the fruit fly Drosophila. The basic structure of ovarioles supports very rapid egg production, with some insects (like termites) producing several thousand eggs per day. Each insect ovary typically contains 4–8 ovarioles, but this number varies widely depending on the insect species. <Br><Br>Scientists use insect ovarioles, for example, to study the basic processes that help various insects, including those that cause disease (like some mosquitos and biting flies), reproduce very quickly.12/18/2020 7:51:27 PM12/18/2020 7:51:27 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Kirilly04-ovaries_M    Medium 67 KB 8/4/2016 10:58 AM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C Please let me know if you have any STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx130100https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{2F3BB903-70BD-41BD-83EC-FFDE93D625AB}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2319588Like a map showing heavily traveled roads, this mathematical model of metabolic activity inside an <i>E. coli</i> cell shows the busiest pathway in white. Reaction pathways used less frequently by the cell are marked in red (moderate activity) and green (even less activity). Visualizations like this one may help scientists identify drug targets that block key metabolic pathways in bacteria. Featured in the January 18, 2005, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/05-01-18/#1 target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.10/29/2020 1:35:42 PM10/29/2020 1:35:42 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2319_mapping_metabolic_S    Low 141 KB 3/29/2019 1:49 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx6750https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{B5BAE43D-B385-47C4-9F8E-2C6E2AE6AB0C}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
58381201This image results from a research project to visualize which regions of the adult fruit fly (Drosophila) brain derive from each neural stem cell. First, researchers collected several thousand fruit fly larvae and fluorescently stained a random stem cell in the brain of each. The idea was to create a population of larvae in which each of the 100 or so neural stem cells was labeled at least once. When the larvae grew to adults, the researchers examined the flies’ brains using confocal microscopy. With this technique, the part of a fly’s brain that derived from a single, labeled stem cell “lights up.” The scientists photographed each brain and digitally colorized its lit-up area. By combining thousands of such photos, they created a 3-dimensional, color-coded map that shows which part of the Drosophila brain comes from each of its ~100 neural stem cells. In other words, each colored region shows which neurons are the progeny or “clones” of a single stem cell. This work established a hierarchical structure as well as nomenclature for the neurons in the Drosophila brain. Further research will relate functions to structures of the brain. Related to image <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID=3808">5868</a> and video<a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID=3749"> 5843</a> 5/13/2022 12:38:45 PM5/13/2022 12:38:45 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified The idea was to create a With this technique, the part of a fly’s brain that derived from a single, labeled stem STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx9270https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{E35C7327-EDA4-46DF-B3D4-A0F7CF02CCC0}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
67971255Yeast cells that abnormally accumulate cell wall material (blue) at their ends and, when preparing to divide, in their middles. This image was captured using wide-field microscopy with deconvolution. <Br><Br> Related to images <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6791">6791</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6792">6792</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6793">6793</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6794">6794</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6798">6798</a>, and videos <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6795">6795</a> and <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6796">6796</a>.7/17/2023 5:08:11 PM7/17/2023 5:08:11 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified YeastCells7_S    Low 12 KB 3/8/2022 9:44 AM Bigler, Abbey (NIH/NIGMS) [C Some of them have one blue end, and STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx8780https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{DDA4D0F0-1444-48F3-91F8-795F76B0BC06}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2702502A combo of protein structures determined experimentally and computationally shows us the complete metabolic network of a heat-loving bacterium.8/6/2020 4:36:05 PM8/6/2020 4:36:05 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2702_Thermotoga_maritima_and_its_metabolic_network_T    Thumbnail 97 KB 3/29/2019 11:00 AM Constantinides STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx9760https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{8BCB0A5C-8081-41B2-AEC1-62DCCD78EE99}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
701213315Each morning, the nocturnal Hawaiian bobtail squid, <em>Euprymna scolopes</em>, hides from predators by digging into the sand. At dusk, it leaves the sand again to hunt. <Br><Br>Related to image <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=7010">7010</a> and <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=7011">7011</a>. 4/5/2024 7:56:21 PM4/5/2024 7:56:21 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Adult squid burying    High 848 KB 4/17/2024 10:22 AM aamershaha (NIH/NIGMS) [C Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx5480https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{BAD9BAA2-8A5F-49B8-93C1-DE40B7A7F6C2}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3477551This image is a computer-generated model of the approximately 4.2 million atoms of the HIV capsid, the shell that contains the virus' genetic material. Scientists determined the exact structure of the capsid and the proteins that it's made of using a variety of imaging techniques and analyses. They then entered these data into a supercomputer that produced the atomic-level image of the capsid. This structural information could be used for developing drugs that target the capsid, possibly leading to more effective therapies11/14/2023 1:23:33 PM11/14/2023 1:23:33 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified and the proteins that it's made of using a variety of imaging techniques and analyses They then entered these data into a STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx9750https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{4475C347-ACA7-4D71-B1A5-B70167940ACF}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
68971299A zebrafish embryo showing its natural colors. Zebrafish have see-through eggs and embryos, making them ideal research organisms for studying the earliest stages of development. This image was taken in transmitted light under a polychromatic polarizing microscope. 6/30/2022 12:03:38 PM6/30/2022 12:03:38 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Zebrafish_M    Medium 27 KB 6/30/2022 8:04 AM Crowley, Rachel (NIH/NIGMS) [E I have more images, which I can share with the NIGMS Image and Video STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx9880https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{B1FED72B-6831-4E21-B021-678F186C50C4}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2767716A research mentor (Lori Eidson) and student (Nina Waldron, on the microscope) were 2009 members of the BRAIN (Behavioral Research Advancements In Neuroscience) program at Georgia State University in Atlanta. This program is an undergraduate summer research experience funded in part by NIGMS.8/28/2020 5:55:19 PM8/28/2020 5:55:19 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2767_Research_mentor_and_S    Low 89 KB 3/29/2019 10:56 AM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx95120https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{17C50E5A-1D3E-40D2-A327-B4B098B9FFBA}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2320589How far and fast an infectious disease spreads across a community depends on many factors, including transportation. These U.S. maps, developed as part of an international study to simulate and analyze disease spread, chart daily commuting patterns. They show where commuters live (top) and where they travel for work (bottom). Green represents the fewest number of people whereas orange, brown, and white depict the most. Such information enables researchers and policymakers to visualize how an outbreak in one area can spread quickly across a geographic region. Featured in the August 15, 2007, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/07-08-15/#1 target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.10/29/2020 1:48:39 PM10/29/2020 1:48:39 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2320_mappingdisease1_S    Low 134 KB 3/29/2019 1:49 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx7760https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{DCC53428-D85F-4B28-AE7A-1BDF3A1498B7}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2807856Confocal image showing high levels of the protein vimentin (white) at the edge zone of a quail embryo. Cell nuclei are labeled green. More specifically, this high-magnification (60X) image shows vimentin immunofluorescence in the edge zone (top of image) and inner zone (bottom of image) of a Stage 4 quail blastoderm. Vimentin expression (white) is shown merged with Sytox nuclear labeling (green) at the edge of the blastoderm. A thick vimentin filament runs circumferentially (parallel to the direction of the edge) that appears to delineate the transition between the edge zone and interior zone. Also shown are dense vimentin clusters or foci, which typically appear to be closely associated with edge cell nuclei. This image appeared in a <a href=http://gtresearchnews.gatech.edu/quail-embryo/ target="_blank">March 2011 Georgia Tech news release</a>. An NIGMS grant to Professor Garcia was used to purchase the confocal microscope that collected this image. Related entries: 2808 and 2809.12/22/2020 4:28:11 PM12/22/2020 4:28:11 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified vimentin_hires    High 403 KB 6/3/2016 3:18 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Also shown are dense vimentin clusters or STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx8290https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{ECFC258C-6BEC-4C4F-9998-00CB33ACD7D8}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
69651241As this cell was undergoing cell division, it was imaged with two microscopy techniques: differential interference contrast (DIC) and confocal. The DIC view appears in blue and shows the entire cell. The confocal view appears in pink and shows the chromosomes.1/27/2023 9:51:37 PM1/27/2023 9:51:37 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified An oblong blue shape with a with two different microscopy techniques: differential interference contrast (DIC) and STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx10680https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{CCDAC100-8DE1-4D58-8378-2F585CC18A16}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2708504A blue laser beam turns on a protein that helps this human cancer cell move. Responding to the stimulus, the protein, called Rac1, first creates ruffles at the edge of the cell. Then it stretches the cell forward, following the light like a horse trotting after a carrot on a stick. This new light-based approach can turn Rac1 (and potentially many other proteins) on and off at exact times and places in living cells. By manipulating a protein that controls movement, the technique also offers a new tool to study embryonic development, nerve regeneration and cancer. Featured in the September 16, 2009, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/09-09-16/index.html#1 target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.8/6/2020 4:31:43 PM8/6/2020 4:31:43 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified a protein that controls movement, the technique also offers a new tool to study embryonic A blue laser beam turns on STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx8150https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{687A0EA7-3610-49D0-AED1-F7F73EBE909C}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2771717Under the microscope, an <i>E. coli</i> cell lights up like a fireball. Each bright dot marks a surface protein that tells the bacteria to move toward or away from nearby food and toxins. Using a new imaging technique, researchers can map the proteins one at a time and combine them into a single image. This lets them study patterns within and among protein clusters in bacterial cells, which don't have nuclei or organelles like plant and animal cells. Seeing how the proteins arrange themselves should help researchers better understand how cell signaling works. A movie containing this image was featured in the August 19, 2009, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/09-08-19/index.html#1 target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.8/28/2020 5:59:20 PM8/28/2020 5:59:20 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Using a new imaging technique, researchers can map the proteins one at a time and combine STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx9360https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{12F702C2-09EA-4026-A4FF-44FEB4FB31A5}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
69031262Real-time movie of young squids. Squids are often used as research organisms due to having the largest nervous system of any invertebrate, complex behaviors like instantaneous camouflage, and other unique traits. <Br><Br>This video was taken with polychromatic polarization microscope, as described in the <em>Scientific Reports</em> paper <a href=" https://www.nature.com/articles/srep17340/">“Polychromatic Polarization Microscope: Bringing Colors to a Colorless World”</a> by Shribak. The color is generated by interaction of white polarized light with the squid’s transparent soft tissue. The tissue works as a living tunable spectral filter, and the transmission band depends on the molecular orientation. When the young squid is moving, the tissue orientation changes, and its color shifts accordingly. 1/5/2024 1:57:43 PM1/5/2024 1:57:43 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Tools and Techniques https://www.nature.com/articles/srep17340 --this reference is just to show the technique STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx9660https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{ABADE292-B556-4A17-BD4E-BDDEC4893BEA}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2419483This image of the human brain uses colors and shapes to show neurological differences between two people. The blurred front portion of the brain, associated with complex thought, varies most between the individuals. The blue ovals mark areas of basic function that vary relatively little. Visualizations like this one are part of a project to map complex and dynamic information about the human brain, including genes, enzymes, disease states, and anatomy. The brain maps represent collaborations between neuroscientists and experts in math, statistics, computer science, bioinformatics, imaging, and nanotechnology. Featured in the October 18, 2005, issue of <a href="http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/05-10-18/#1" target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.5/12/2021 8:58:25 PM5/12/2021 8:58:25 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Brain_map_M    Medium 67 KB 6/3/2016 3:10 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C This image of the human brain uses STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx8040https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{B082809A-5B3D-4BD2-B182-2FFDA2EBAE5B}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
701313327An adult female Hawaiian bobtail squid, <em>Euprymna scolopes</em>, with its mantle cavity exposed from the underside. Some internal organs are visible, including the two lobes of the light organ that contains bioluminescent bacteria, <em>Vibrio fischeri</em>. The light organ includes accessory tissues like an ink sac (black) that serves as a shutter, and a silvery reflector that directs the light out of the underside of the animal.4/5/2024 8:00:36 PM4/5/2024 8:00:36 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified We, the creators/owners of these images and videos, grant permission to post them in the NIGMS Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx5060https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{FE32D4A7-FB2E-4857-8370-2A6ECC0F717A}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2576700A shell from the venomous cone snail <i>Conus omaria</i>, which lives in the Pacific and Indian oceans and eats other snails. University of Utah scientists discovered a new toxin in this snail species' venom, and say it will be a useful tool in designing new medicines for a variety of brain disorders, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, depression, nicotine addiction and perhaps schizophrenia.10/30/2020 4:26:56 PM10/30/2020 4:26:56 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified cone_snail_1_S    Low 47 KB 8/24/2016 5:34 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx7840https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{96C38932-2035-4122-BF08-1F98065B2306}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
701413366<em>Vibrio fischeri</em> (2 mm in length) is the exclusive symbiotic partner of the Hawaiian bobtail squid, <em>Euprymna scolopes</em>. After this bacterium uses its flagella to swim from the seawater into the light organ of a newly hatched juvenile, it colonizes the host and loses the appendages. This image was taken using a scanning electron microscope.4/5/2024 8:05:28 PM4/5/2024 8:05:28 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified This material is free of copyright restrictions Margaret J. McFall-Ngai, Carnegie Institution for Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx4750https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{D2DCA51D-4439-4AE1-AE93-424A424C5481}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2332785This fingertip-shaped group of lights is a microscopic crystal called a quantum dot. About 10,000 times thinner than a sheet of paper, the dot radiates brilliant colors under ultraviolet light. Dots such as this one allow researchers to label and track individual molecules in living cells and may soon be used for speedy disease diagnosis, DNA testing, and screening for illegal drugs. Featured in the April 18, 2006, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/06-04-18/ target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.10/29/2020 2:26:34 PM10/29/2020 2:26:34 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified tiny_points_of_light_M    Medium 20 KB 6/3/2016 3:08 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx9080https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{D7A5D97F-8A57-4159-8882-08C793E64466}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
65921217Cell-like compartments that spontaneously emerged from scrambled frog eggs, with nuclei (blue) from frog sperm. Endoplasmic reticulum (red) and microtubules (green) are also visible. Image created using confocal microscopy. <br> <p>For more photos of cell-like compartments from frog eggs view: <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6584">6584</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6585">6585</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6586">6586</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6591">6591</a>, and <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6593">6593</a>.</p> <p>For videos of cell-like compartments from frog eggs view:&nbsp;<a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6587">6587</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6588">6588</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6589">6589</a>, and <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6590">6590</a>.</p>9/13/2020 3:38:40 PM9/13/2020 3:38:40 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified img5_cheng_confocal_nuc_t40_M    Medium 66 KB 9/15/2020 10:07 AM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx7560https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{10111D22-D87A-4A9F-82B8-5C98DB9E5D44}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
35961088See video with ID <a href=http://images.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=2580><i>2580</i></a> in Image Gallery.2/16/2021 10:15:43 PM2/16/2021 10:15:43 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified These time series show the heart rates of four different individuals Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx7540https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{6A9EA434-6BFD-4A66-A76A-C292E11501E9}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
35981090Originally from the waters of India, Nepal and neighboring countries, zebrafish can now be found swimming in science labs (and home aquariums) throughout the world. This fish is a favorite study subject for scientists interested in how genes guide the early stages of prenatal development (including the developing fin shown here) and in the effects of environmental contamination on embryos.<Br><Br> In this image, green fluorescent protein (GFP) is expressed where the gene sox9b is expressed. Collagen (red) marks the fin rays, and DNA, stained with a dye called DAPI, is in blue. sox9b plays many important roles during development, including the building the heart and brain and is also necessary for skeletal development. At the University of Wisconsin, researchers have found that exposure to contaminants that bind the aryl-hydrocarbon receptor results in the downregulation of sox9b. Loss of sox9b severely disrupts development in zebrafish and causes a life-threatening disorder called campomelic dysplasia (CD) in humans. CD is characterized by cardiovascular, neural and skeletal defects. By studying the roles of genes such as sox9b in zebrafish, scientists hope to better understand normal development in humans as wells as how to treat developmental disorders and diseases.<Br><Br> This image is part of the Life: Magnified collection, which was displayed in the Gateway Gallery at Washington Dulles International Airport June 3, 2014, to January 21, 2015. To see all 46 images in this exhibit, to <a href="https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/life-magnified/Pages/default.aspx">click here</a>.11/28/2022 9:23:03 PM11/28/2022 9:23:03 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 11A_zebrafish fin2_Plavicki_H    High 7560 KB 10/19/2020 2:56 AM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx6940https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{EA2A80AC-BD59-4A63-8FFC-C5AF94747636}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
69321268An axolotl—a type of salamander—that has been genetically modified so that its developing nervous system glows purple and its Schwann cell nuclei appear light blue. Schwann cells insulate and provide nutrients to peripheral nerve cells. Researchers often study axolotls for their extensive regenerative abilities. They can regrow tails, limbs, spinal cords, brains, and more. The researcher who took this image focuses on the role of the peripheral nervous system during limb regeneration. <Br><Br> This image was captured using a stereo microscope. <Br><Br> Related to images <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6927">6927</a> and <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6928">6928</a>. 3/28/2023 7:22:11 PM3/28/2023 7:22:11 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Purple Axolotl_M    Medium 92 KB 3/28/2023 2:13 PM Bigler, Abbey (NIH/NIGMS) [C Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx8860https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{C3BEC74E-68A6-4729-9CC3-F59BF6253164}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
67681223Rhodopsin is a pigment in the rod cells of the retina (back of the eye). It is extremely light-sensitive, supporting vision in low-light conditions. Here, it is attached to arrestin, a protein that sends signals in the body. This structure was determined using an X-ray free electron laser.6/27/2021 7:16:00 PM6/27/2021 7:16:00 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 5w0p_assembly-1_L    Low 10 KB 9/21/2021 10:21 AM Dolan, Lauren (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx7750https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{20059BCD-8181-42F5-B69A-43B5BD2A1244}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
68101234Three fruit fly (<em>Drosophila melanogaster</em>) ovarioles (yellow, blue, and magenta) with egg cells visible inside them. Ovarioles are tubes in the reproductive systems of female insects. Egg cells form at one end of an ovariole and complete their development as they reach the other end, as shown in the yellow wild-type ovariole. This process requires an important protein that is missing in the blue and magenta ovarioles. This image was created using confocal microscopy. <Br><Br> More information on the research that produced this image can be found in the <em> Current Biology</em> paper <a href="https://www.cell.com/current-biology/fulltext/S0960-9822(21)00669-2?_returnURL=https%3A%2F%2Flinkinghub.elsevier.com%2Fretrieve%2Fpii%2FS0960982221006692%3Fshowall%3Dtrue">“Gatekeeper function for Short stop at the ring canals of the <em>Drosophila</em> ovary”</a> by Lu et al. 1/21/2022 3:51:54 PM1/21/2022 3:51:54 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Fruit fly ovarioles_6810_M    Medium 290 KB 2/11/2022 2:16 PM Dolan, Lauren (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx9650https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{C9C95BC4-65E6-4B68-BC4A-814E3F8B69D5}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
68991301High-resolution time lapse of epithelial (skin) cell migration and wound healing. It shows an image taken every 13 seconds over the course of almost 14 minutes. The images were captured with quantitative orientation-independent differential interference contrast (DIC) microscope (left) and a conventional DIC microscope (right). <Br><Br>More information about the research that produced this video can be found in the <em>Journal of Microscopy</em> paper <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jmi.12682/">“An Orientation-Independent DIC Microscope Allows High Resolution Imaging of Epithelial Cell Migration and Wound Healing in a Cnidarian Model”</a> by Malamy and Shribak. 6/30/2022 4:45:48 PM6/30/2022 4:45:48 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified circularlamellipodia    High 17708 KB 6/30/2022 3:03 PM Crowley, Rachel (NIH/NIGMS) [E STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx7270https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{497BC427-08F6-402E-B25B-3FF48F096460}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
68081232Two fruit fly (<em>Drosophila melanogaster</em>) larvae brains with neurons expressing fluorescently tagged tubulin protein. Tubulin makes up strong, hollow fibers called microtubules that play important roles in neuron growth and migration during brain development. This image was captured using confocal microscopy, and the color indicates the position of the neurons within the brain.1/20/2022 7:49:11 PM1/20/2022 7:49:11 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Drosophila 3rd instar larval brain expressing neuronal tubulin-Wen Lu and Vladimir I. Gelfand_M    Medium 175 KB STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx7550https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{8643DBC3-712E-4596-B178-AE3E38631BAB}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2322591What looks like a Native American dream catcher is really a network of social interactions within a community. The red dots along the inner and outer circles represent people, while the different colored lines represent direct contact between them. All connections originate from four individuals near the center of the graph. Modeling social networks can help researchers understand how diseases spread. Featured in the July 19, 2005, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/05-07-19/#1 target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.12/20/2021 8:56:59 PM12/20/2021 8:56:59 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified modeling_disease_spread2_M    Medium 23 KB 6/3/2016 3:08 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx139180https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{1F12E63B-4E70-4853-AD74-33C85990768D}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
68051229<em>Staphylococcus aureus</em> bacteria (green) grouping together upon contact with synovial fluid—a viscous substance found in joints. The formation of groups can help protect the bacteria from immune system defenses and from antibiotics, increasing the likelihood of an infection. This video is a 1-hour time lapse and was captured using a confocal laser scanning microscope. <Br><Br> More information about the research that produced this video can be found in the <em>Journal of Bacteriology</em> paper <a href="https://journals.asm.org/doi/10.1128/jb.00451-22">"<em>In Vitro</em> Staphylococcal Aggregate Morphology and Protection from Antibiotics Are Dependent on Distinct Mechanisms Arising from Postsurgical Joint Components and Fluid Motion"</a> by Staats et al. <Br><Br> Related to images <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6803">6803</a> and <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6804">6804</a>. 10/18/2023 2:58:49 PM10/18/2023 2:58:49 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Br><Br> More information about the research that produced this video can be found in Technique: Fluorescence Time-lapse Imaging used for image collection; 1 hour of imaging STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx8750https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{61CD18EB-4854-45A7-9B35-B685982060F1}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
69271263The head of an axolotl—a type of salamander—that has been genetically modified so that its developing nervous system glows purple and its Schwann cell nuclei appear light blue. Schwann cells insulate and provide nutrients to peripheral nerve cells. Researchers often study axolotls for their extensive regenerative abilities. They can regrow tails, limbs, spinal cords, brains, and more. The researcher who took this image focuses on the role of the peripheral nervous system during limb regeneration. <Br><Br> This image was captured using a light sheet microscope. <Br><Br> Related to images <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6928">6928</a> and <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6932">6932</a>. 3/28/2023 7:20:06 PM3/28/2023 7:20:06 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Axolotl Nervous System_M    Medium 421 KB 3/28/2023 9:59 AM Bigler, Abbey (NIH/NIGMS) [C Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx10650https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{18B0DBF0-DA94-4093-9314-DEBA854A5439}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
7022397992Individual cells are color-coded based on their identity and signaling activity using a protein circuit technology developed by the Coyle Lab. Just as a radio allows you to listen to an individual frequency, this technology allows researchers to tune into the specific “radio station” of each cell through genetically encoded proteins from a bacterial system called MinDE. The proteins generate an oscillating fluorescent signal that transmits information about cell shape, state, and identity that can be decoded using digital signal processing tools originally designed for telecommunications. The approach allows researchers to look at the dynamics of a single cell in the presence of many other cells. <Br><Br> Related to image <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=7021">7021</a>. 5/6/2024 1:17:37 PM5/6/2024 1:17:37 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Cellular Radios    High 21072 KB 5/6/2024 9:18 AM Crowley, Rachel (NIH/NIGMS) [E STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx28160https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{9FAB5B84-9249-463F-AAD3-63C7B2CC4E76}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
69331269Various views of a zebrafish head with blood vessels shown in purple. Researchers often study zebrafish because they share many genes with humans, grow and reproduce quickly, and have see-through eggs and embryos, which make it easy to study early stages of development. <Br><Br> This video was captured using a light sheet microscope. <Br><Br> Related to image <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6934">6934</a>. 3/28/2023 7:28:33 PM3/28/2023 7:28:33 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Zebrafish    High 79865 KB 3/28/2023 2:27 PM Bigler, Abbey (NIH/NIGMS) [C Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx10680https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{51C6DED5-0B9A-4BCB-BB8C-2DEF96D5D9F7}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
58951006Details about the basic biology and chemistry of the ingredients that produce bioluminescence are allowing scientists to harness it as an imaging tool. Credit: Nathan Shaner, Scintillon Institute.<br></br> From Biomedical Beat article July 2017: <a href="https://biobeat.nigms.nih.gov/2017/07/chasing-fireflies-and-better-cellular-imaging-techniques/#more-4455">Chasing Fireflies—and Better Cellular Imaging Techniques</a>3/1/2021 7:16:46 PM3/1/2021 7:16:46 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified bioluminescent microcentrifuge tubes_M    Medium 132 KB 7/21/2017 1:40 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx6840https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{F551D249-3908-41B8-8C99-C5109BA71043}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
68061230The two large, central, round shapes are ovaries from a typical fruit fly (<em>Drosophila melanogaster</em>). The small butterfly-like structures surrounding them are fruit fly ovaries where researchers suppressed the expression of a gene that controls microtubule polymerization and is necessary for normal development. This image was captured using a confocal laser scanning microscope. <Br><Br> Related to image <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6807">6807</a>. 1/21/2022 3:55:03 PM1/21/2022 3:55:03 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Wild-type and mutant fruit fly ovaries_M    Medium 119 KB 2/11/2022 1:44 PM Dolan, Lauren (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx9450https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{1CE96574-AF64-43B2-8987-EDADC4899FE7}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
7021397991Individual cells are color-coded based on their identity and signaling activity using a protein circuit technology developed by the Coyle Lab. Just as a radio allows you to listen to an individual frequency, this technology allows researchers to tune into the specific “radio station” of each cell through genetically encoded proteins from a bacterial system called MinDE. The proteins generate an oscillating fluorescent signal that transmits information about cell shape, state, and identity that can be decoded using digital signal processing tools originally designed for telecommunications. The approach allows researchers to look at the dynamics of a single cell in the presence of many other cells. <Br><Br> Related to video <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=7022">7022</a>. 5/6/2024 1:14:29 PM5/6/2024 1:14:29 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Cellular Radios Image_M    Medium 103 KB 5/6/2024 9:16 AM Crowley, Rachel (NIH/NIGMS) [E STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx28150https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{C1F2A98A-EC04-4C48-85FB-F2FE32D09692}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
68901345Microtubules (magenta) in neurons of the hippocampus, a part of the brain involved in learning and memory. Microtubules are strong, hollow fibers that provide structural support to cells. This image was captured using Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy (STORM). <Br><Br> Related to images <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6889">6889</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6891">6891</a>, and <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6892">6892</a>.4/4/2023 8:30:37 PM4/4/2023 8:30:37 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Microtubules_S    Low 27 KB 4/4/2022 10:57 AM Bigler, Abbey (NIH/NIGMS) [C Let me know if this is good or if STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx8670https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{669EF01C-7579-40A0-B4AD-BB86AF96AA93}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
67511246This Petri dish contains microscopic roundworms called <i>Caenorhabditis elegans</i>. Researchers used these particular worms to study how <i>C. elegans</i> senses the color of light in its environment. 3/24/2021 5:46:13 PM3/24/2021 5:46:13 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Ghosh et al_SciPak multimedia 3_2.24.2021_M    Medium 162 KB 3/24/2021 12:21 PM Walter Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx11770https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{C00999DD-94AD-4601-AB49-4C393FEDCF73}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
68911296Microtubules in African green monkey cells. Microtubules are strong, hollow fibers that provide cells with structural support. Here, the microtubules have been color-coded based on their distance from the microscope lens: purple is closest to the lens, and yellow is farthest away. This image was captured using Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy (STORM). <Br><Br> Related to images <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6889">6889</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6890">6890</a>, and <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6892">6892</a>. 4/4/2022 4:10:02 PM4/4/2022 4:10:02 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified MicrotubulesinMonkeyCells_M    Medium 240 KB 4/4/2022 10:39 AM Bigler, Abbey (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx9240https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{1F39E3DF-F3C9-48A9-9597-492A967EA195}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2455810A team of chemists and physicists used nanotechnology and DNA's ability to self-assemble with matching RNA to create a new kind of chip for measuring gene activity. When RNA of a gene of interest binds to a DNA tile (gold squares), it creates a raised surface (white areas) that can be detected by a powerful microscope. This nanochip approach offers manufacturing and usage advantages over existing gene chips and is a key step toward detecting gene activity in a single cell. Featured in the February 20, 2008, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/08-02-20/index.html#1 target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.8/20/2020 5:51:20 PM8/20/2020 5:51:20 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2455_Gold_gene_S    Low 127 KB 3/29/2019 11:27 AM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx9250https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{1D011269-3AA9-44C4-8D58-702C27B5F5B6}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
69311267Various views of a mouse brain that was genetically modified so that subpopulations of its neurons glow. Researchers often study mice because they share many genes with people and can shed light on biological processes, development, and diseases in humans. <Br><Br> This video was captured using a light sheet microscope. <Br><Br> Related to images <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6929">6929</a> and <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6930">6930</a>. 3/28/2023 7:25:52 PM3/28/2023 7:25:52 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified MouseBrainThumbnail    Thumbnail 251 KB 3/28/2023 1:42 PM Bigler, Abbey (NIH/NIGMS) [C Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx9060https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{E8BA1CD7-FBAD-470A-8536-1897FD575924}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131