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2767716A research mentor (Lori Eidson) and student (Nina Waldron, on the microscope) were 2009 members of the BRAIN (Behavioral Research Advancements In Neuroscience) program at Georgia State University in Atlanta. This program is an undergraduate summer research experience funded in part by NIGMS.8/28/2020 5:55:19 PM8/28/2020 5:55:19 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2767_Research_mentor_and_S    Low 89 KB 3/29/2019 10:56 AM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx4080https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{17C50E5A-1D3E-40D2-A327-B4B098B9FFBA}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2325594In 2006, scientists developed an optical microscopy technique enabling them to clearly see individual molecules within cells. In 2007, they took the technique, abbreviated STORM, a step further. They identified multicolored probes that let them peer into cells and clearly see multiple cellular components at the same time, such as these microtubules (green) and small hollows called clathrin-coated pits (red). Unlike conventional methods, the multicolor STORM technique produces a crisp and high resolution picture. A sharper view of how cellular components interact will likely help scientists answer some longstanding questions about cell biology. Featured in the October 17, 2007, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/07-10-17/#1 target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.10/29/2020 2:02:16 PM10/29/2020 2:02:16 PMIn 2006, scientists developed an optical microscopy technique enabling them to clearly see individual molecules within Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx4650https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{76D31C7C-D8E7-4BC2-BCAB-8D4B7465DE4F}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
65681272These images illustrate a technique combining cryo-electron tomography and super-resolution fluorescence microscopy called correlative imaging by annotation with single molecules (CIASM). CIASM enables researchers to identify small structures and individual molecules in cells that they couldn’t using older techniques. 12/22/2020 3:22:47 PM12/22/2020 3:22:47 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Figure_2_72dpi    Thumbnail 63 KB 7/16/2020 3:27 PM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx38140https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{93F7C98F-C6A0-4FA2-A019-AA17C2A1B17F}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3600963A mouse's fat cells (red) are shown surrounded by a network of blood vessels (green). Fat cells store and release energy, protect organs and nerve tissues, insulate us from the cold and help us absorb important vitamins. This image is part of the Life: Magnified collection, which was displayed in the Gateway Gallery at Washington Dulles International Airport June 3, 2014, to January 21, 2015. To see all 46 images in this exhibit, go to https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/life-magnified/Pages/default.aspx.11/22/2022 8:43:42 PM11/22/2022 8:43:42 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 7_right_Fat_cells_and_blood_vessel_34in_Malide_H    High 4848 KB 10/19/2020 3:10 AM Harris, Donald (NIH STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx3660https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{F5343960-E864-40C3-A794-C1F7F1C9CD4F}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
67901290Two cells over a 2-hour period. The one on the bottom left goes through programmed cell death, also known as apoptosis. The one on the top right goes through cell division, also called mitosis. This video was captured using a confocal microscope. 12/27/2021 4:57:37 PM12/27/2021 4:57:37 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Technique: Structured Illumination Microscopy (SIM) Video: DNA during cell death and Technique: Confocal STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx53130https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{CC8B5303-F2D9-4014-B9B9-68597C41C367}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
69331269Various views of a zebrafish head with blood vessels shown in purple. Researchers often study zebrafish because they share many genes with humans, grow and reproduce quickly, and have see-through eggs and embryos, which make it easy to study early stages of development. <Br><Br> This video was captured using a light sheet microscope. <Br><Br> Related to image <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6934">6934</a>. 3/28/2023 7:28:33 PM3/28/2023 7:28:33 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Zebrafish    High 79865 KB 3/28/2023 2:27 PM Bigler, Abbey (NIH/NIGMS) [C Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx5690https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{51C6DED5-0B9A-4BCB-BB8C-2DEF96D5D9F7}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3295526Researchers use cluster analysis to study protein shape and function. Each green circle represents one potential shape of the protein mitoNEET. The longer the blue line between two circles, the greater the differences between the shapes. Most shapes are similar; they fall into three clusters that are represented by the three images of the protein. From a Rice University <a href=http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2012-01/ru-rus012612.php target="_blank">news release</a>. Graduate student Elizabeth Baxter and Patricia Jennings, professor of chemistry and biochemistry at UCSD, collaborated with José Onuchic, a physicist at Rice University, on this work.12/22/2020 10:54:21 PM12/22/2020 10:54:21 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Cluster_analysis_of_mysterious_protein_L    Low 46 KB 6/3/2016 3:26 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx5260https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{CD831F69-EC6F-4495-8D60-9CA97CADEEBB}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3400747Blood vessels at the back of the eye (retina) are used to diagnose glaucoma and diabetic eye disease. They also display characteristic changes in people with high blood pressure. In the image, the vessels appear green. It's not actually the vessels that are stained green, but rather filaments of a protein called actin that wraps around the vessels. Most of the red blood cells were replaced by fluid as the tissue was prepared for the microscope. The tiny red dots are red blood cells that remain in the vessels. The image was captured using confocal and 2-photon excitation microscopy for a project related to neurofibromatosis.12/23/2020 8:25:40 PM12/23/2020 8:25:40 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified The tiny red dots are red blood Also, is there anything special about the technique(s) used to obtain this image? Thanks STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx4060https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{1233873B-4276-4C11-861B-FE6A348B950C}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
69621238A <em>Trigonium</em> diatom imaged by a quantitative orientation-independent differential interference contrast (OI-DIC) microscope. Diatoms are single-celled photosynthetic algae with mineralized cell walls that contain silica and provide protection and support. These organisms form an important part of the plankton at the base of the marine and freshwater food chains. The width of this image is 90 μm. <Br><Br> More information about the microscopy that produced this image can be found in the <em>Journal of Microscopy</em> paper <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jmi.12682/">“An Orientation-Independent DIC Microscope Allows High Resolution Imaging of Epithelial Cell Migration and Wound Healing in a Cnidarian Model”</a> by Malamy and Shribak. 1/27/2023 9:46:30 PM1/27/2023 9:46:30 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Trigonium_M    Medium 692 KB 1/27/2023 4:29 PM Bigler, Abbey (NIH/NIGMS) [C The image width is 90 μm STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx79110https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{F78335F9-FB37-4883-9939-AEB00AE242F9}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
68061230The two large, central, round shapes are ovaries from a typical fruit fly (<em>Drosophila melanogaster</em>). The small butterfly-like structures surrounding them are fruit fly ovaries where researchers suppressed the expression of a gene that controls microtubule polymerization and is necessary for normal development. This image was captured using a confocal laser scanning microscope. <Br><Br> Related to image <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6807">6807</a>. 1/21/2022 3:55:03 PM1/21/2022 3:55:03 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Wild-type and mutant fruit fly ovaries_M    Medium 119 KB 2/11/2022 1:44 PM Dolan, Lauren (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx4370https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{1CE96574-AF64-43B2-8987-EDADC4899FE7}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
67501245These microscopic roundworms, called <i>Caenorhabditis elegans</i>, lack eyes and the opsin proteins used by visual systems to detect colors. However, researchers found that the worms can still sense the color of light in a way that enables them to avoid pigmented toxins made by bacteria. This image was captured using a stereo microscope.3/24/2021 5:44:57 PM3/24/2021 5:44:57 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Ghosh et al_SciPak multimedia 1_2.24.2021_M    Medium 42 KB 3/24/2021 11:16 AM Walter, Taylor (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx5680https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{760D483D-C76B-4606-BCD1-4887E3807BC8}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
58151198Genome editing using CRISPR/Cas9 is a rapidly expanding field of scientific research with emerging applications in disease treatment, medical therapeutics and bioenergy, just to name a few. This technology is now being used in laboratories all over the world to enhance our understanding of how living biological systems work, how to improve treatments for genetic diseases and how to develop energy solutions for a better future.12/18/2020 8:24:01 PM12/18/2020 8:24:01 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified doudna video    Thumbnail 832 KB 12/20/2016 1:20 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C And if the answer is yes STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx39170https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{9583BEF7-4257-4FF7-AC04-5362F743D198}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2702502A combo of protein structures determined experimentally and computationally shows us the complete metabolic network of a heat-loving bacterium.8/6/2020 4:36:05 PM8/6/2020 4:36:05 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2702_Thermotoga_maritima_and_its_metabolic_network_T    Thumbnail 97 KB 3/29/2019 11:00 AM Constantinides STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx4380https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{8BCB0A5C-8081-41B2-AEC1-62DCCD78EE99}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
69031262Real-time movie of young squids. Squids are often used as research organisms due to having the largest nervous system of any invertebrate, complex behaviors like instantaneous camouflage, and other unique traits. <Br><Br>This video was taken with polychromatic polarization microscope, as described in the <em>Scientific Reports</em> paper <a href=" https://www.nature.com/articles/srep17340/">“Polychromatic Polarization Microscope: Bringing Colors to a Colorless World”</a> by Shribak. The color is generated by interaction of white polarized light with the squid’s transparent soft tissue. The tissue works as a living tunable spectral filter, and the transmission band depends on the molecular orientation. When the young squid is moving, the tissue orientation changes, and its color shifts accordingly. 1/5/2024 1:57:43 PM1/5/2024 1:57:43 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Tools and Techniques https://www.nature.com/articles/srep17340 --this reference is just to show the technique STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx4870https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{ABADE292-B556-4A17-BD4E-BDDEC4893BEA}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
37711039Viruses have been the foes of animals and other organisms for time immemorial. For almost as long, they've stayed well hidden from view because they are so tiny (they aren't even cells, so scientists call the individual virus a "particle"). This image shows a molecular model of a particle of the Rous sarcoma virus, a virus that infects and sometimes causes cancer in chickens. In the background is a photo of red blood cells. The particle shown is "immature" (not yet capable of infecting new cells) because it has just budded from an infected chicken cell and entered the bird's bloodstream. The outer shell of the immature virus is made up of a regular assembly of large proteins (shown in red) that are linked together with short protein molecules called peptides (green). This outer shell covers and protects the proteins (blue) that form the inner shell of the particle. But as you can see, the protective armor of the immature virus contains gaping holes. As the particle matures, the short peptides are removed and the large proteins rearrange, fusing together into a solid sphere capable of infecting new cells. While still immature, the particle is vulnerable to drugs that block its development. Knowing the structure of the immature particle may help scientists develop better medications against RSV and similar viruses in humans. Scientists used sophisticated computational tools to reconstruct the RSV atomic structure by crunching various data on the RSV proteins to simulate the entire structure of immature RSV. For more on RSV and how researchers revealed its delicate structure, see the NIH director's blog post <a href="https://directorsblog.nih.gov/2016/04/14/snapshots-of-life-imperfect-but-beautiful-intruder/">Snapshots of Life: Imperfect but Beautiful Intruder.</a>12/17/2020 6:39:16 PM12/17/2020 6:39:16 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Imperfect_intruder_for_NIH    High 9721 KB 6/3/2016 3:41 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx37150https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{A147967A-CD83-453D-8FF9-DC930253A9F5}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3604965Along with blood vessels (red) and nerve cells (green), this mouse brain shows abnormal protein clumps known as plaques (blue). These plaques multiply in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease and are associated with the memory impairment characteristic of the disease. Because mice have genomes nearly identical to our own, they are used to study both the genetic and environmental factors that trigger Alzheimer's disease. Experimental treatments are also tested in mice to identify the best potential therapies for human patients. This image is part of the Life: Magnified collection, which was displayed in the Gateway Gallery at Washington Dulles International Airport June 3, 2014, to January 21, 2015. To see all 46 images in this exhibit, go to https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/life-magnified/Pages/default.aspx.11/22/2022 7:23:52 PM11/22/2022 7:23:52 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 10_alzheimerbrain_s_T    Thumbnail 5 KB 6/3/2016 3:33 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx5270https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{5E098B48-2D3B-477A-82C0-1A20292EAF17}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
68011259A macrophage—a type of immune cell that engulfs invaders—“eats” and is activated by a “two-faced” Janus particle. The particle is called “two-faced” because each of its two hemispheres is coated with a different type of molecule, shown here in red and cyan. During macrophage activation, a transcription factor tagged with a green fluorescence protein (NF-κB) gradually moves from the cell’s cytoplasm into its nucleus and causes DNA transcription. The distribution of molecules on “two-faced” Janus particles can be altered to control the activation of immune cells. Details on this “geometric manipulation” strategy can be found in the <em> Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences</em> paper <a href="https://www.pnas.org/content/116/50/25106.long">"Geometrical reorganization of Dectin-1 and TLR2 on single phagosomes alters their synergistic immune signaling" </a> by Li et al. and the <em> Scientific Reports</em> paper<a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-021-92910-9"> "Spatial organization of FcγR and TLR2/1 on phagosome membranes differentially regulates their synergistic and inhibitory receptor crosstalk"</a> by Li et al. This video was captured using epi-fluorescence microscopy. <Br><Br>Related to video <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6800">6800</a>.8/18/2023 12:40:34 PM8/18/2023 12:40:34 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Macrophage activation-H    High 20221 KB 1/21/2022 2:50 PM Dolan, Lauren (NIH/NIGMS) [C Here is the link to a STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx32100https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{31BAA0E0-226C-4A0C-84A7-8C772C0B3749}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3477551This image is a computer-generated model of the approximately 4.2 million atoms of the HIV capsid, the shell that contains the virus' genetic material. Scientists determined the exact structure of the capsid and the proteins that it's made of using a variety of imaging techniques and analyses. They then entered these data into a supercomputer that produced the atomic-level image of the capsid. This structural information could be used for developing drugs that target the capsid, possibly leading to more effective therapies11/14/2023 1:23:33 PM11/14/2023 1:23:33 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified and the proteins that it's made of using a variety of imaging techniques and analyses They then entered these data into a STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx4950https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{4475C347-ACA7-4D71-B1A5-B70167940ACF}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2332785This fingertip-shaped group of lights is a microscopic crystal called a quantum dot. About 10,000 times thinner than a sheet of paper, the dot radiates brilliant colors under ultraviolet light. Dots such as this one allow researchers to label and track individual molecules in living cells and may soon be used for speedy disease diagnosis, DNA testing, and screening for illegal drugs. Featured in the April 18, 2006, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/06-04-18/ target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.10/29/2020 2:26:34 PM10/29/2020 2:26:34 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified tiny_points_of_light_M    Medium 20 KB 6/3/2016 3:08 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx3760https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{D7A5D97F-8A57-4159-8882-08C793E64466}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2368791Automated methods using micromachined silicon are used at the Northeast Collaboratory for Structural Genomics to mount protein crystals for X-ray crystallography.10/29/2020 4:20:47 PM10/29/2020 4:20:47 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified hi_nesg4_crystalmt_L    Low 35 KB 6/3/2016 3:09 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx5470https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{6F34EFEE-C10B-4FAD-AEBF-F450BA7F39C6}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
69281264Axolotls—a type of salamander—that have been genetically modified so that various parts of their nervous systems glow purple and green. Researchers often study axolotls for their extensive regenerative abilities. They can regrow tails, limbs, spinal cords, brains, and more. The researcher who took this image focuses on the role of the peripheral nervous system during limb regeneration. <Br><Br> This image was captured using a stereo microscope. <Br><Br> Related to images <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6927">6927</a> and <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6932">6932</a>. 3/28/2023 8:07:20 PM3/28/2023 8:07:20 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Multiple Axolotls_M    Medium 191 KB 3/28/2023 1:17 PM Bigler, Abbey (NIH/NIGMS) [C Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx39100https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{808924E1-6D1E-4693-AF54-9CFAB370BB78}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2771717Under the microscope, an <i>E. coli</i> cell lights up like a fireball. Each bright dot marks a surface protein that tells the bacteria to move toward or away from nearby food and toxins. Using a new imaging technique, researchers can map the proteins one at a time and combine them into a single image. This lets them study patterns within and among protein clusters in bacterial cells, which don't have nuclei or organelles like plant and animal cells. Seeing how the proteins arrange themselves should help researchers better understand how cell signaling works. A movie containing this image was featured in the August 19, 2009, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/09-08-19/index.html#1 target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.8/28/2020 5:59:20 PM8/28/2020 5:59:20 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Using a new imaging technique, researchers can map the proteins one at a time and combine STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx4780https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{12F702C2-09EA-4026-A4FF-44FEB4FB31A5}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
69651241As this cell was undergoing cell division, it was imaged with two microscopy techniques: differential interference contrast (DIC) and confocal. The DIC view appears in blue and shows the entire cell. The confocal view appears in pink and shows the chromosomes.1/27/2023 9:51:37 PM1/27/2023 9:51:37 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified An oblong blue shape with a with two different microscopy techniques: differential interference contrast (DIC) and STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx5160https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{CCDAC100-8DE1-4D58-8378-2F585CC18A16}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
69321268An axolotl—a type of salamander—that has been genetically modified so that its developing nervous system glows purple and its Schwann cell nuclei appear light blue. Schwann cells insulate and provide nutrients to peripheral nerve cells. Researchers often study axolotls for their extensive regenerative abilities. They can regrow tails, limbs, spinal cords, brains, and more. The researcher who took this image focuses on the role of the peripheral nervous system during limb regeneration. <Br><Br> This image was captured using a stereo microscope. <Br><Br> Related to images <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6927">6927</a> and <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6928">6928</a>. 3/28/2023 7:22:11 PM3/28/2023 7:22:11 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Purple Axolotl_M    Medium 92 KB 3/28/2023 2:13 PM Bigler, Abbey (NIH/NIGMS) [C Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx4580https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{C3BEC74E-68A6-4729-9CC3-F59BF6253164}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
68081232Two fruit fly (<em>Drosophila melanogaster</em>) larvae brains with neurons expressing fluorescently tagged tubulin protein. Tubulin makes up strong, hollow fibers called microtubules that play important roles in neuron growth and migration during brain development. This image was captured using confocal microscopy, and the color indicates the position of the neurons within the brain.1/20/2022 7:49:11 PM1/20/2022 7:49:11 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Drosophila 3rd instar larval brain expressing neuronal tubulin-Wen Lu and Vladimir I. Gelfand_M    Medium 175 KB STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx3670https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{8643DBC3-712E-4596-B178-AE3E38631BAB}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3339934This is a super-resolution LM image taken by Hiro Hakozaki and Masa Hoshijima of NCMIR. The image contains highlighted calcium channels in cardiac muscle using a technique called dSTORM. The microscope used in the NCMIR lab was built by Hiro Hakozaki.12/23/2020 5:37:10 PM12/23/2020 5:37:10 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified dSTORM_Cardiac1_L    Low 131 KB 6/3/2016 3:27 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx3950https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{0E46207E-187E-4107-BAE4-5B30FD3E8DE2}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
68051229<em>Staphylococcus aureus</em> bacteria (green) grouping together upon contact with synovial fluid—a viscous substance found in joints. The formation of groups can help protect the bacteria from immune system defenses and from antibiotics, increasing the likelihood of an infection. This video is a 1-hour time lapse and was captured using a confocal laser scanning microscope. <Br><Br> More information about the research that produced this video can be found in the <em>Journal of Bacteriology</em> paper <a href="https://journals.asm.org/doi/10.1128/jb.00451-22">"<em>In Vitro</em> Staphylococcal Aggregate Morphology and Protection from Antibiotics Are Dependent on Distinct Mechanisms Arising from Postsurgical Joint Components and Fluid Motion"</a> by Staats et al. <Br><Br> Related to images <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6803">6803</a> and <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6804">6804</a>. 10/18/2023 2:58:49 PM10/18/2023 2:58:49 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Br><Br> More information about the research that produced this video can be found in Technique: Fluorescence Time-lapse Imaging used for image collection; 1 hour of imaging STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx4760https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{61CD18EB-4854-45A7-9B35-B685982060F1}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
5793999What looks like the gossamer wings of a butterfly is actually the retina of a mouse, delicately snipped to lay flat and sparkling with fluorescent molecules. The image is from a research project investigating the promise of gene therapy for glaucoma. It was created at an NIGMS-funded advanced microscopy facility that develops technology for imaging across many scales, from whole organisms to cells to individual molecules. <BR><BR> The ability to obtain high-resolution imaging of tissue as large as whole mouse retinas was made possible by a technique called large-scale mosaic confocal microscopy, which was pioneered by the NIGMS-funded National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research. The technique is similar to Google Earth in that it computationally stitches together many small, high-resolution images. <BR><BR> More details: <BR><BR> Glaucoma is a progressive eye disease and the leading cause of irreversible blindness. It is characterized by the death of neurons in the retina called retinal ganglion cells. A number of studies over the past decade suggest that targeting these cells with gene therapy designed to prevent their death might slow the progression of glaucoma. <BR><BR> This study is investigating whether a non-disease-causing virus (adeno-associated virus serotype 2) can effectively deliver genes to retinal ganglion cells. The researchers introduced into the virus a gene for green fluorescent protein (GFP) so they could visualize how well the virus transduced the cells. <BR><BR> Two months after viral delivery of the fluorescent vector to the eyes of 7-month-old mice, the researchers examined the entire retinas of the subjects under a microscope. The ability to obtain high-resolution imaging of tissue as large as whole mouse retinas was made possible by a technique called large-scale mosaic confocal microscopy, which was pioneered by the NIGMS-funded National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research. The technique is similar to Google Earth in that it computationally stitches together many small, high-resolution images. <BR><BR> The researchers observed GFP expression (yellow) in all parts of the retinal ganglion cells (blue), including the soma, axons and dendritic tree. These results suggest that a viral delivery system could deliver therapeutic genes to retinal ganglion cells for treating glaucoma and related diseases. <BR><BR> EQUIPMENT: Olympus FluoView™ FV1000 Confocal Microscope. Fluorophores: green fluorescent protein and Alexa Fluor 568. Non-glaucomatous DBA/2J-Gpnmb+ mice. <BR><BR> Reflecting on the work, the lead researcher [Keunyoung (“Christine”) Kim] says: “It is amazing to see intricate and artistically organized microscopic structures. … I encountered an entirely new world invisible to the naked eye—a galaxy of infinite secrets and endless potential for discovery.” 7/19/2023 8:25:17 PM7/19/2023 8:25:17 PMby a technique called large-scale mosaic confocal microscopy, which was pioneered by the The technique is similar to Google Earth in that it computationally stitches together many STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx4750https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{E2CC74AB-01A0-4BBC-964B-CF278FF727BA}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
69271263The head of an axolotl—a type of salamander—that has been genetically modified so that its developing nervous system glows purple and its Schwann cell nuclei appear light blue. Schwann cells insulate and provide nutrients to peripheral nerve cells. Researchers often study axolotls for their extensive regenerative abilities. They can regrow tails, limbs, spinal cords, brains, and more. The researcher who took this image focuses on the role of the peripheral nervous system during limb regeneration. <Br><Br> This image was captured using a light sheet microscope. <Br><Br> Related to images <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6928">6928</a> and <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6932">6932</a>. 3/28/2023 7:20:06 PM3/28/2023 7:20:06 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Axolotl Nervous System_M    Medium 421 KB 3/28/2023 9:59 AM Bigler, Abbey (NIH/NIGMS) [C Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx5980https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{18B0DBF0-DA94-4093-9314-DEBA854A5439}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2320589How far and fast an infectious disease spreads across a community depends on many factors, including transportation. These U.S. maps, developed as part of an international study to simulate and analyze disease spread, chart daily commuting patterns. They show where commuters live (top) and where they travel for work (bottom). Green represents the fewest number of people whereas orange, brown, and white depict the most. Such information enables researchers and policymakers to visualize how an outbreak in one area can spread quickly across a geographic region. Featured in the August 15, 2007, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/07-08-15/#1 target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.10/29/2020 1:48:39 PM10/29/2020 1:48:39 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2320_mappingdisease1_S    Low 134 KB 3/29/2019 1:49 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx3760https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{DCC53428-D85F-4B28-AE7A-1BDF3A1498B7}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
57701047Cell division is an incredibly coordinated process. It not only ensures that the new cells formed during this event have a full set of chromosomes, but also that they are endowed with all the cellular materials, including proteins, lipids and small functional compartments called organelles, that are required for normal cell activity. This proper apportioning of essential cell ingredients helps each cell get off to a running start.<Br><Br> This image shows an electron microscopy (EM) thin section taken at 10,000x magnification of a dividing yeast cell over-expressing the protein ubiquitin, which is involved in protein degradation and recycling. The picture features mother and daughter endosome accumulations (small organelles with internal vesicles), a darkly stained vacuole and a dividing nucleus in close contact with a cadre of lipid droplets (unstained spherical bodies). Other dynamic events are also visible, such as spindle microtubules in the nucleus and endocytic pits at the plasma membrane. <Br><Br>These extensive details were revealed thanks to a preservation method involving high-pressure freezing, freeze-substitution and Lowicryl HM20 embedding. 12/18/2020 6:43:14 PM12/18/2020 6:43:14 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified doa4cs_oeUb_co69a_M    Medium 119 KB 7/26/2016 12:30 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx4370https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{F7AE0A8B-16E1-4D6F-95FD-BF2175A028B9}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
69631239Real-time footage of <em>Caenorhabditis elegans</em>, a tiny roundworm, trapped by a carnivorous fungus, <em>Arthrobotrys dactyloides</em>. This fungus makes ring traps in response to the presence of <em>C. elegans</em>. When a worm enters a ring, the trap rapidly constricts so that the worm cannot move away, and the fungus then consumes the worm. The size of the imaged area is 0.7mm x 0.9mm. <Br><Br> This video was obtained with a polychromatic polarizing microscope (PPM) in white light that shows the polychromatic birefringent image with hue corresponding to the slow axis orientation. More information about PPM can be found in the <em>Scientific Reports</em> paper <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/srep17340/">“Polychromatic Polarization Microscope: Bringing Colors to a Colorless World”</a> by Shribak. 1/27/2023 9:47:31 PM1/27/2023 9:47:31 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Celegans in Fungus Image    Thumbnail 670 KB 1/27/2023 4:37 PM Bigler, Abbey (NIH/NIGMS Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx80100https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{0F0A87C1-A526-4B01-B302-2C04F7127B77}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2455810A team of chemists and physicists used nanotechnology and DNA's ability to self-assemble with matching RNA to create a new kind of chip for measuring gene activity. When RNA of a gene of interest binds to a DNA tile (gold squares), it creates a raised surface (white areas) that can be detected by a powerful microscope. This nanochip approach offers manufacturing and usage advantages over existing gene chips and is a key step toward detecting gene activity in a single cell. Featured in the February 20, 2008, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/08-02-20/index.html#1 target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.8/20/2020 5:51:20 PM8/20/2020 5:51:20 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2455_Gold_gene_S    Low 127 KB 3/29/2019 11:27 AM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx5160https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{1D011269-3AA9-44C4-8D58-702C27B5F5B6}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
66011323This animation shows atoms of the HIV capsid, the shell that encloses the virus's genetic material. Scientists determined the exact structure of the capsid using a variety of imaging techniques and analyses. They then entered this data into a supercomputer to produce this image. Related to image <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=3477">3477</a>. 11/14/2023 1:23:27 PM11/14/2023 1:23:27 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Atomic-Level Structure of the HIV Capsid    High 20229 KB 12/10/2020 5:41 PM Walter, Taylor (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx4470https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{2C77B30F-B214-4301-B475-E0433A651C12}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3556956Luciferase-based imaging enables visualization and quantification of internal organs and transplanted cells in live adult zebrafish. In this image, a cardiac muscle-restricted promoter drives firefly luciferase expression. Lateral (Top) and overhead views (Bottom) are shown.10/5/2020 5:20:22 AM10/5/2020 5:20:22 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Poss-zebrafish-01    High 416 KB 6/3/2016 3:31 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C br>For imagery of the overhead STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx5590https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{3D1F01B8-728A-4F3D-B381-CF2B50DEAA2C}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
67891289Two mouse fibroblasts, one of the most common types of cells in mammalian connective tissue. They play a key role in wound healing and tissue repair. This image was captured using structured illumination microscopy. 12/27/2021 4:20:11 PM12/27/2021 4:20:11 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Technique: Structured Illumination Microscopy (SIM) Video: DNA during cell death and Technique: Confocal STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx5660https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{911FF0EB-C528-450C-93F7-22CEEFA45FCF}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
65721276The 3D single-molecule super-resolution reconstruction of the entire nuclear lamina in a HeLa cell was acquired using the TILT3D platform. TILT3D combines a tilted light sheet with point-spread function (PSF) engineering to provide a flexible imaging platform for 3D single-molecule super-resolution imaging in mammalian cells. <br> See <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6573">6573</a> for 3 seperate views of this structure.<br>12/22/2020 3:20:41 PM12/22/2020 3:20:41 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified NuclearLamina_300dpi_M    Medium 117 KB 7/16/2020 5:42 PM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx33130https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{D065B67F-284D-48AA-98C1-513E4A756EF1}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
57301190Gene transcription is a process by which information encoded in DNA is transcribed into RNA. It's essential for all life and requires the activity of proteins, called transcription factors, that detect where in a DNA strand transcription should start. In eukaryotes (i.e., those that have a nucleus and mitochondria), a protein complex comprising 14 different proteins is responsible for sniffing out transcription start sites and starting the process. This complex represents the core machinery to which an enzyme, named RNA polymerase, can bind to and read the DNA and transcribe it to RNA. Scientists have used cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to visualize the TFIID-RNA polymerase-DNA complex in unprecedented detail. This animation shows the different TFIID components as they contact DNA and recruit the RNA polymerase for gene transcription. <br><br>To learn more about the research that has shed new light on gene transcription, see this <a href="http://newscenter.lbl.gov/2016/03/23/unlocking-the-secrets-of-gene-expression/">news release from Berkeley Lab</a>. <br><br>Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID=709">image 3766</a>.2/3/2020 10:28:36 PM2/3/2020 10:28:36 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 5730_Louder-Movie-trimmed_T    Thumbnail 69 KB 3/28/2019 3:26 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx48100https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{36FD005B-EAFE-4CFD-B66A-A2A602DD3612}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
37421182The photo shows a confocal microscopy image of perineuronal nets (PNNs), which are specialized extracellular matrix (ECM) structures in the brain. The PNN surrounds some nerve cells in brain regions including the cortex, hippocampus and thalamus. Researchers study the PNN to investigate their involvement stabilizing the extracellular environment and forming nets around nerve cells and synapses in the brain. Abnormalities in the PNNs have been linked to a variety of disorders, including epilepsy and schizophrenia, and they limit a process called neural plasticity in which new nerve connections are formed. To visualize the PNNs, researchers labeled them with Wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA)-fluorescein. Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3741">image 3741</a>.12/17/2020 5:35:24 PM12/17/2020 5:35:24 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 3742_Cortex_neuronal_ECM_S    Low 128 KB 3/28/2019 4:01 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx4880https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{FC6C3E72-F217-4DDB-A4D4-6C0B904EC50A}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
63521309This image shows how the CRISPR surveillance complex is disabled by two copies of anti-CRISPR protein AcrF1 (red) and one AcrF2 (light green). These anti-CRISPRs block access to the CRISPR RNA (green tube) preventing the surveillance complex from scanning and targeting invading viral DNA for destruction. 12/21/2020 5:09:58 PM12/21/2020 5:09:58 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified CRISPR 2 of 2 NRAMM    High 197 KB 11/29/2017 11:59 AM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx34140https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{152D7892-75BF-4DA9-913D-B1FCC618DA85}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2708504A blue laser beam turns on a protein that helps this human cancer cell move. Responding to the stimulus, the protein, called Rac1, first creates ruffles at the edge of the cell. Then it stretches the cell forward, following the light like a horse trotting after a carrot on a stick. This new light-based approach can turn Rac1 (and potentially many other proteins) on and off at exact times and places in living cells. By manipulating a protein that controls movement, the technique also offers a new tool to study embryonic development, nerve regeneration and cancer. Featured in the September 16, 2009, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/09-09-16/index.html#1 target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.8/6/2020 4:31:43 PM8/6/2020 4:31:43 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified a protein that controls movement, the technique also offers a new tool to study embryonic A blue laser beam turns on STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx3940https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{687A0EA7-3610-49D0-AED1-F7F73EBE909C}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
35181076Scanning electron micrograph of just-divided HeLa cells. Zeiss Merlin HR-SEM. See related images 3519,3520,3521,3522.9/27/2020 3:27:26 AM9/27/2020 3:27:26 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified HeLaV_L    Low 119 KB 6/3/2016 3:30 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C National Center for Microscopy and Imaging STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx3490https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{DF35293D-4426-449F-97F4-E899122B7824}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
67981256Yeast cells with nuclear envelopes shown in magenta and tubulin shown in light blue. The nuclear envelope defines the borders of the nucleus, which houses DNA. Tubulin is a protein that makes up microtubules—strong, hollow fibers that provide structure to cells and help direct chromosomes during cell division. This image was captured using wide-field microscopy with deconvolution. <Br><Br> Related to images <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6791">6791</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6792">6792</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6793">6793</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6794">6794</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6797">6797</a>, and videos <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6795">6795</a> and <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6796">6796</a>.7/17/2023 5:07:46 PM7/17/2023 5:07:46 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified YeastCells8_M    Low 19 KB 1/28/2022 2:22 PM Dolan, Lauren (NIH/NIGMS) [C Permission email: Hi Abbey, My name STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx4980https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{3BE03231-0BFB-4A6D-93AC-9F52ADA3C1C4}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
69291265A mouse brain that was genetically modified so that subpopulations of its neurons glow. Researchers often study mice because they share many genes with people and can shed light on biological processes, development, and diseases in humans. <Br><Br> This image was captured using a light sheet microscope. <Br><Br> Related to image <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6930">6930</a> and video <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6931">6931</a>. 3/28/2023 7:24:12 PM3/28/2023 7:24:12 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Green Mouse Brain_M    Medium 466 KB 3/28/2023 1:26 PM Bigler, Abbey (NIH/NIGMS) [C Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx5390https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{69FC294A-0B60-42B9-8ECF-C9318895AAF5}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2419483This image of the human brain uses colors and shapes to show neurological differences between two people. The blurred front portion of the brain, associated with complex thought, varies most between the individuals. The blue ovals mark areas of basic function that vary relatively little. Visualizations like this one are part of a project to map complex and dynamic information about the human brain, including genes, enzymes, disease states, and anatomy. The brain maps represent collaborations between neuroscientists and experts in math, statistics, computer science, bioinformatics, imaging, and nanotechnology. Featured in the October 18, 2005, issue of <a href="http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/05-10-18/#1" target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.5/12/2021 8:58:25 PM5/12/2021 8:58:25 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Brain_map_M    Medium 67 KB 6/3/2016 3:10 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C This image of the human brain uses STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx4240https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{B082809A-5B3D-4BD2-B182-2FFDA2EBAE5B}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2576700A shell from the venomous cone snail <i>Conus omaria</i>, which lives in the Pacific and Indian oceans and eats other snails. University of Utah scientists discovered a new toxin in this snail species' venom, and say it will be a useful tool in designing new medicines for a variety of brain disorders, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, depression, nicotine addiction and perhaps schizophrenia.10/30/2020 4:26:56 PM10/30/2020 4:26:56 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified cone_snail_1_S    Low 47 KB 8/24/2016 5:34 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx3940https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{96C38932-2035-4122-BF08-1F98065B2306}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
67511246This Petri dish contains microscopic roundworms called <i>Caenorhabditis elegans</i>. Researchers used these particular worms to study how <i>C. elegans</i> senses the color of light in its environment. 3/24/2021 5:46:13 PM3/24/2021 5:46:13 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Ghosh et al_SciPak multimedia 3_2.24.2021_M    Medium 162 KB 3/24/2021 12:21 PM Walter Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx6370https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{C00999DD-94AD-4601-AB49-4C393FEDCF73}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
65931218Cell-like compartments that spontaneously emerged from scrambled frog eggs, with nuclei (blue) from frog sperm. Endoplasmic reticulum (red) and microtubules (green) are also visible. Image created using confocal microscopy. <br> <p>For more photos of cell-like compartments from frog eggs view: <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6584">6584</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6585">6585</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6586">6586</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6591">6591</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6592">6592</a>.</p> <p>For videos of cell-like compartments from frog eggs view:&nbsp;<a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6587">6587</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6588">6588</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6589">6589</a>, and <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6590">6590</a>.</p>9/13/2020 3:39:51 PM9/13/2020 3:39:51 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified img6_cheng_confocal_nuc_t76_M    Medium 62 KB 9/15/2020 10:04 AM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx4480https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{552FC5C2-8EFE-4A87-9B6E-FE57AED81528}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
57291189The HIV capsid is pear-shaped structure that is made of proteins the virus needs to mature and become infective. The capsid is inside the virus and delivers the virus' genetic information into a human cell. To better understand how the HIV capsid does this feat, scientists have used computer programs to simulate its assembly. This image shows a series of snapshots of the steps that grow the HIV capsid. A model of a complete capsid is shown on the far right of the image for comparison; the green, blue and red colors indicate different configurations of the capsid protein that make up the capsid “shell.” The bar in the left corner represents a length of 20 nanometers, which is less than a tenth the size of the smallest bacterium. Computer models like this also may be used to reconstruct the assembly of the capsids of other important viruses, such as Ebola or the Zika virus. <br><br> The studies reporting this research were published in <a href="http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2016/160513/ncomms11568/full/ncomms11568.html"><i>Nature Communications</i></a> and <a href="http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v469/n7330/full/nature09640.html"><i>Nature</i></a>. <br><br> To learn more about how researchers used computer simulations to track the assembly of the HIV capsid, see <a href=" https://news.uchicago.edu/article/2016/06/14/simulations-describe-hivs-diabolical-delivery-device">this press release from the University of Chicago</a>.12/18/2020 4:10:47 PM12/18/2020 4:10:47 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified HIV capsid synthesis 222px_TransparentBackground-1_S    Thumbnail 127 KB 3/20/2017 9:21 AM Machalek, Alisa STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx8960https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{C1FD6483-5B69-49FD-9F08-5665166A3E1D}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3458547This computer algorithm plots all feasible small carbon-based molecules as though they were cities on a map and identifies huge, unexplored spaces that may help fuel research into new drug therapies. Featured in the May 16, 2013 issue of <em><a href="http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/#2">Biomedical Beat</a><em>.8/22/2020 7:17:19 PM8/22/2020 7:17:19 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Algorithm_L    Low 154 KB 6/3/2016 3:29 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C This computer algorithm plots all feasible small carbon-based molecules as though they were cities on a map and identifies huge, unexplored STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx5680https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{BD5FBD91-00F8-4BDD-A62E-D08594363089}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131