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347745993This image is a computer-generated model of the approximately 4.2 million atoms of the HIV capsid, the shell that contains the virus' genetic material. Scientists determined the exact structure of the capsid and the proteins that it's made of using a variety of imaging techniques and analyses. They then entered these data into a supercomputer that produced the atomic-level image of the capsid. This structural information could be used for developing drugs that target the capsid, possibly leading to more effective therapies8/31/2020 4:28:05 AM8/31/2020 4:28:05 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified and the proteins that it's made of using a variety of imaging techniques and analyses They then entered these data into a STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{4475C347-ACA7-4D71-B1A5-B70167940ACF}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
656846264These images illustrate a technique combining cryo-electron tomography and super-resolution fluorescence microscopy called correlative imaging by annotation with single molecules (CIASM). CIASM enables researchers to identify small structures and individual molecules in cells that they couldn’t using older techniques. 12/22/2020 3:22:47 PM12/22/2020 3:22:47 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Figure_2_72dpi    Thumbnail 63 KB 7/16/2020 3:27 PM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{93F7C98F-C6A0-4FA2-A019-AA17C2A1B17F}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
232539621In 2006, scientists developed an optical microscopy technique enabling them to clearly see individual molecules within cells. In 2007, they took the technique, abbreviated STORM, a step further. They identified multicolored probes that let them peer into cells and clearly see multiple cellular components at the same time, such as these microtubules (green) and small hollows called clathrin-coated pits (red). Unlike conventional methods, the multicolor STORM technique produces a crisp and high resolution picture. A sharper view of how cellular components interact will likely help scientists answer some longstanding questions about cell biology. Featured in the October 17, 2007, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/07-10-17/#1 target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.10/29/2020 2:02:16 PM10/29/2020 2:02:16 PMIn 2006, scientists developed an optical microscopy technique enabling them to clearly see individual molecules within Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{76D31C7C-D8E7-4BC2-BCAB-8D4B7465DE4F}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
589546220Details about the basic biology and chemistry of the ingredients that produce bioluminescence are allowing scientists to harness it as an imaging tool. Credit: Nathan Shaner, Scintillon Institute.<br></br> From Biomedical Beat article July 2017: <a href="https://biobeat.nigms.nih.gov/2017/07/chasing-fireflies-and-better-cellular-imaging-techniques/#more-4455">Chasing Fireflies—and Better Cellular Imaging Techniques</a>3/1/2021 7:16:46 PM3/1/2021 7:16:46 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified bioluminescent microcentrifuge tubes_M    Medium 132 KB 7/21/2017 1:40 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{F551D249-3908-41B8-8C99-C5109BA71043}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
69033616Real-time movie of young squids. Squids are often used as research organisms due to having the largest nervous system of any invertebrate, complex behaviors like instantaneous camouflage, and other unique traits. <Br><Br>This video was taken with polychromatic polarization microscope, as described in the <em>Scientific Reports</em> paper <a href=" https://www.nature.com/articles/srep17340/">“ Polychromatic Polarization Microscope: Bringing Colors to a Colorless World”</a> by Shribak. The color is generated by interaction of white polarized light with the squid’s transparent soft tissue. The tissue works as a living tunable spectral filter, and the transmission band depends on the molecular orientation. When the young squid is moving, the tissue orientation changes, and its color shifts accordingly. 6/30/2022 7:06:15 PM6/30/2022 7:06:15 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Tools and Techniques https://www.nature.com/articles/srep17340 --this reference is just to show the technique STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{ABADE292-B556-4A17-BD4E-BDDEC4893BEA}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
232039610How far and fast an infectious disease spreads across a community depends on many factors, including transportation. These U.S. maps, developed as part of an international study to simulate and analyze disease spread, chart daily commuting patterns. They show where commuters live (top) and where they travel for work (bottom). Green represents the fewest number of people whereas orange, brown, and white depict the most. Such information enables researchers and policymakers to visualize how an outbreak in one area can spread quickly across a geographic region. Featured in the August 15, 2007, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/07-08-15/#1 target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.10/29/2020 1:48:39 PM10/29/2020 1:48:39 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2320_mappingdisease1_S    Low 134 KB 3/29/2019 1:49 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{DCC53428-D85F-4B28-AE7A-1BDF3A1498B7}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
333945922This is a super-resolution LM image taken by Hiro Hakozaki and Masa Hoshijima of NCMIR. The image contains highlighted calcium channels in cardiac muscle using a technique called dSTORM. The microscope used in the NCMIR lab was built by Hiro Hakozaki.12/23/2020 5:37:10 PM12/23/2020 5:37:10 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified dSTORM_Cardiac1_L    Low 131 KB 6/3/2016 3:27 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{0E46207E-187E-4107-BAE4-5B30FD3E8DE2}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
233239633This fingertip-shaped group of lights is a microscopic crystal called a quantum dot. About 10,000 times thinner than a sheet of paper, the dot radiates brilliant colors under ultraviolet light. Dots such as this one allow researchers to label and track individual molecules in living cells and may soon be used for speedy disease diagnosis, DNA testing, and screening for illegal drugs. Featured in the April 18, 2006, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/06-04-18/ target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.10/29/2020 2:26:34 PM10/29/2020 2:26:34 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified tiny_points_of_light_M    Medium 20 KB 6/3/2016 3:08 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{D7A5D97F-8A57-4159-8882-08C793E64466}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
257639977A shell from the venomous cone snail <i>Conus omaria</i>, which lives in the Pacific and Indian oceans and eats other snails. University of Utah scientists discovered a new toxin in this snail species' venom, and say it will be a useful tool in designing new medicines for a variety of brain disorders, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, depression, nicotine addiction and perhaps schizophrenia.10/30/2020 4:26:56 PM10/30/2020 4:26:56 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified cone_snail_1_S    Low 47 KB 8/24/2016 5:34 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{96C38932-2035-4122-BF08-1F98065B2306}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
271541881These six-month-old axolotls, a kind of salamander, glow green and blue under ultraviolet light. That's because they were genetically modified to make harmless green fluorescent protein, or GFP. Like X-ray vision, GFP lets you see inside the axolotls as they hang out in their aquarium. GFP not only can reveal internal structures in living organisms, but it also can light up specific cells and even proteins within a cell. That allows scientists to identify and track things like cancer cells. Featured in the November 18, 2009 issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/09-11-18/index.html#1 target="_blank"><i>Biomedical Beat</i></a>.8/6/2020 5:03:23 PM8/6/2020 5:03:23 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2715_axolotls_S    Low 41 KB 3/29/2019 10:59 AM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{06348EA2-A821-4F0E-A69C-E06C9CC45935}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
359646052See video with ID <a href=http://images.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=2580><i>2580</i></a> in Image Gallery.2/16/2021 10:15:43 PM2/16/2021 10:15:43 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified These time series show the heart rates of four different individuals Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{6A9EA434-6BFD-4A66-A76A-C292E11501E9}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
579346189What looks like the gossamer wings of a butterfly is actually the retina of a mouse, delicately snipped to lay flat and sparkling with fluorescent molecules. The image is from a research project investigating the promise of gene therapy for glaucoma. It was created at an NIGMS-funded advanced microscopy facility that develops technology for imaging across many scales, from whole organisms to cells to individual molecules. <BR><BR> The ability to obtain high-resolution imaging of tissue as large as whole mouse retinas was made possible by a technique called large-scale mosaic confocal microscopy, which was pioneered by the NIGMS-funded National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research. The technique is similar to Google Earth in that it computationally stitches together many small, high-resolution images. <BR><BR> More details: <BR><BR> Glaucoma is a progressive eye disease and the leading cause of irreversible blindness. It is characterized by the death of neurons in the retina called retinal ganglion cells. A number of studies over the past decade suggest that targeting these cells with gene therapy designed to prevent their death might slow the progression of glaucoma. <BR><BR> This study is investigating whether a non-disease-causing virus (adeno-associated virus serotype 2) can effectively deliver genes to retinal ganglion cells. The researchers introduced into the virus a gene for green fluorescent protein (GFP) so they could visualize how well the virus transduced the cells. <BR><BR> Two months after viral delivery of the fluorescent vector to the eyes of 7-month-old mice, the researchers examined the entire retinas of the subjects under a microscope. The ability to obtain high-resolution imaging of tissue as large as whole mouse retinas was made possible by a technique called large-scale mosaic confocal microscopy, which was pioneered by the NIGMS-funded National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research. The technique is similar to Google Earth in that it computationally stitches together many small, high-resolution images. <BR><BR> The researchers observed GFP expression (yellow) in all parts of the retinal ganglion cells (blue), including the soma, axons and dendritic tree. These results suggest that a viral delivery system could deliver therapeutic genes to retinal ganglion cells for treating glaucoma and related diseases. <BR><BR> EQUIPMENT: Olympus FluoView™ FV1000 Confocal Microscope. Fluorophores: green fluorescent protein and Alexa Fluor 568. Non-glaucomatous DBA/2J-Gpnmb+ mice. <BR><BR> Reflecting on the work, the lead researcher [Keunyoung (“Christine”) Kim] says: “It is amazing to see intricate and artistically organized microscopic structures. … I encountered an entirely new world invisible to the naked eye—a galaxy of infinite secrets and endless potential for discovery.” 12/18/2020 8:02:50 PM12/18/2020 8:02:50 PMThe technique is similar to Google Earth in that it computationally stitches together many was made possible by a technique called large-scale mosaic confocal microscopy, which was STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{E2CC74AB-01A0-4BBC-964B-CF278FF727BA}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
675246307The white circle in this image is a Petri dish, named for its inventor, Julius Richard Petri. These dishes are one of the most common pieces of equipment in biology labs, where researchers use them to grow cells. 3/24/2021 4:29:32 PM3/24/2021 4:29:32 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Ghosh et al_SciPak multimedia 2_2.24.2021_M    Medium 197 KB 3/24/2021 12:30 PM Walter Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{9E398F6D-39AB-4C53-9AC1-2968D86BF556}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
360046056A mouse's fat cells (red) are shown surrounded by a network of blood vessels (green). Fat cells store and release energy, protect organs and nerve tissues, insulate us from the cold and help us absorb important vitamins. This image is part of the Life: Magnified collection, which was displayed in the Gateway Gallery at Washington Dulles International Airport June 3, 2014, to January 21, 2015. To see all 46 images in this exhibit, go to https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/life-magnified/Pages/default.aspx.10/19/2020 7:06:14 AM10/19/2020 7:06:14 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 7_right_Fat_cells_and_blood_vessel_34in_Malide_H    High 4848 KB 10/19/2020 3:10 AM Harris, Donald (NIH STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{F5343960-E864-40C3-A794-C1F7F1C9CD4F}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
237539673Irina Dementieva, a biochemist, and Youngchang Kim, a biophysicist and crystallographer, work with the first robot if its type in the U.S. to automate protein prufication. The robot, which is housed in a refrigerator, is an integral part of the Midwest Structural Genomics Center's plan to automate the protein crystallography process.2/3/2021 7:38:27 PM2/3/2021 7:38:27 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified th_pg12_27014k04    Thumbnail 9 KB 6/3/2016 3:09 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{D3D16ADE-9B98-4EDE-A85C-A03856F00966}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
273742839Molecular biologists are increasingly relying on bioinformatics software to visualize molecular interaction networks and to integrate these networks with data such as gene expression profiles. Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=2749">image 2749</a>.6/2/2022 6:16:40 PM6/2/2022 6:16:40 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Cytoscape_S    Low 173 KB 7/28/2016 4:05 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{67F7DB45-9727-4B4F-AB86-6631CB63E31E}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
679045291Two cells over a 2-hour period. The one on the bottom left goes through programmed cell death, also known as apoptosis. The one on the top right goes through cell division, also called mitosis. This video was captured using a confocal microscope. 12/27/2021 4:57:37 PM12/27/2021 4:57:37 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Technique: Structured Illumination Microscopy (SIM) Video: DNA during cell death and Technique: Confocal STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{CC8B5303-F2D9-4014-B9B9-68597C41C367}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
675646311Researchers doing behavioral experiments with honeybees sometimes use paint or enamel to give individual bees distinguishing marks. The elaborate social structure and impressive learning and navigation abilities of bees make them good models for behavioral and neurobiological research. Since the sequencing of the honeybee genome, published in 2006, bees have been used increasingly for research into the molecular basis for social interaction and other complex behaviors.4/6/2021 4:32:46 PM4/6/2021 4:32:46 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified IGB Tagged Bees Robinson Lab_M    Medium 654 KB 4/6/2021 12:35 PM Walter, Taylor (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{97555590-86F6-40A8-9859-7654050B334E}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
276745845A research mentor (Lori Eidson) and student (Nina Waldron, on the microscope) were 2009 members of the BRAIN (Behavioral Research Advancements In Neuroscience) program at Georgia State University in Atlanta. This program is an undergraduate summer research experience funded in part by NIGMS.8/28/2020 5:55:19 PM8/28/2020 5:55:19 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2767_Research_mentor_and_S    Low 89 KB 3/29/2019 10:56 AM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{17C50E5A-1D3E-40D2-A327-B4B098B9FFBA}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
675146306This Petri dish contains microscopic roundworms called <i>Caenorhabditis elegans</i>. Researchers used these particular worms to study how <i>C. elegans</i> senses the color of light in its environment. 3/24/2021 5:46:13 PM3/24/2021 5:46:13 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Ghosh et al_SciPak multimedia 3_2.24.2021_M    Medium 162 KB 3/24/2021 12:21 PM Walter Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{C00999DD-94AD-4601-AB49-4C393FEDCF73}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
235639654Student Christina Hueneke of the Midwest Center for Structural Genomics is overseeing a protein cloning robot. The robot was designed as part of an effort to exponentially increase the output of a traditional web lab. Part of the center's goal is to cut the average cost of analyzing a protein from $200,000 to $20,000 and to slash the average time from months to days and hours.10/29/2020 3:46:50 PM10/29/2020 3:46:50 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified hi_25980k05_robo_M    Medium 213 KB 6/3/2016 3:09 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{D7D4DEC1-573D-4631-837D-923AF376135A}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
275443395This simulation of myosin V binding to actin was created using the software tool Protein Mechanica. With Protein Mechanica, researchers can construct models using information from a variety of sources: crystallography, cryo-EM, secondary structure descriptions, as well as user-defined solid shapes, such as spheres and cylinders. The goal is to enable experimentalists to quickly and easily simulate how different parts of a molecule interact.8/21/2020 6:10:42 PM8/21/2020 6:10:42 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified mv_dimer_T    Thumbnail 4 KB 6/3/2016 3:17 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{0B867130-6ACF-4FC5-A90B-30B55CA4182D}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6806487The two large, central, round shapes are ovaries from a typical fruit fly (<em>Drosophila melanogaster</em>). The small butterfly-like structures surrounding them are fruit fly ovaries where researchers suppressed the expression of a gene that controls microtubule polymerization and is necessary for normal development. This image was captured using a confocal laser scanning microscope. <Br><Br> Related to image <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6807">6807</a>. 1/21/2022 3:55:03 PM1/21/2022 3:55:03 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Wild-type and mutant fruit fly ovaries_M    Medium 119 KB 2/11/2022 1:44 PM Dolan, Lauren (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{1CE96574-AF64-43B2-8987-EDADC4899FE7}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
235739657This ACAPELLA robot for capillary protein crystallization grows protein crystals, freezes them, and centers them without manual intervention. The close-up is a view of one of the dispensers used for dispensing proteins and reagents.10/29/2020 3:49:11 PM10/29/2020 3:49:11 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified hi_ACAPELLA_L    Low 72 KB 6/3/2016 3:09 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{7331CD7F-A0B3-4872-BAD9-2422C41200EB}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
274943386This image integrates the thousands of known molecular and genetic interactions happening inside our bodies using a computer program called Cytoscape. Images like this are known as network wiring diagrams, but Cytoscape creator Trey Ideker somewhat jokingly calls them "hairballs" because they can be so complicated, intricate and hard to tease apart. Cytoscape comes with tools to help scientists study specific interactions, such as differences between species or between sick and diseased cells. Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=2737">image 2737</a>. Featured in the June 16, 2010, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/10-06-16/index.html#1 target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.8/12/2020 6:44:41 PM8/12/2020 6:44:41 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified network_map_23_S    Low 88 KB 9/7/2016 2:25 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{2C441A06-3184-4A25-8DE1-C55F3EC23FBE}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
678945286Two mouse fibroblasts, one of the most common types of cells in mammalian connective tissue. They play a key role in wound healing and tissue repair. This image was captured using structured illumination microscopy. 12/27/2021 4:20:11 PM12/27/2021 4:20:11 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Technique: Structured Illumination Microscopy (SIM) Video: DNA during cell death and Technique: Confocal STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{911FF0EB-C528-450C-93F7-22CEEFA45FCF}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
231739607These colorful, computer-generated ribbons show the backbone of a molecule that glows a fluorescent red. The molecule, called mStrawberry, was created by chemists based on a protein found in the ruddy lips of a coral. Scientists use the synthetic molecule and other "fruity" ones like it as a dye to mark and study cell structures. Featured in the April 18, 2007, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/07-04-18/#1 target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.10/29/2020 1:18:41 PM10/29/2020 1:18:41 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2317_FruitDyes_S    Low 83 KB 3/29/2019 1:51 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{62278375-2AA3-4063-84BB-497CE6085362}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
343745977This image shows the hierarchical ontology of genes, cellular components and processes derived from large genomic datasets. From Dutkowski et al. <a href= "http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23242164" target="_blank">A gene ontology inferred from molecular networks </a>Nat Biotechnol. 2013 Jan;31(1):38-45. Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3436">image 3436</a>.8/22/2020 4:42:01 PM8/22/2020 4:42:01 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified NeXO_300dpi_L    Low 69 KB 6/3/2016 3:29 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{18E1FF8B-85D6-4F50-B7CE-4ED55E15A013}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
236439664This slide shows the technologies that the Joint Center for Structural Genomics developed for going from gene to structure and how the technologies have been integrated into a high-throughput pipeline, including all of the steps from target selection, parallel expression, protein purification, automated crystallization trials, automated crystal screening, structure determination, validation, and publication.10/29/2020 4:14:36 PM10/29/2020 4:14:36 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified hi_JCSG_HT_fig1_M    Medium 141 KB 6/3/2016 3:09 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{CB7FC174-4D2A-4475-86DE-2E0C2E11209E}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
272241966Established in 1953, the Coriell Institute for Medical Research distributes cell lines and DNA samples to researchers around the world. Shown here are Coriell's cryogenic tanks filled with liquid nitrogen and millions of vials of frozen cells.8/6/2020 6:16:05 PM8/6/2020 6:16:05 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Coriell_Biobank_S    Low 93 KB 8/26/2016 3:20 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{26882F91-6529-4022-B2D4-D3CA3547FE70}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
359846054Originally from the waters of India, Nepal and neighboring countries, zebrafish can now be found swimming in science labs (and home aquariums) throughout the world. This fish is a favorite study subject for scientists interested in how genes guide the early stages of prenatal development (including the developing fin shown here) and in the effects of environmental contamination on embryos.<Br><Br> In this image, green fluorescent protein (GFP) is expressed where the gene sox9b is expressed. Collagen (red) marks the fin rays, and DNA, stained with a dye called DAPI, is in blue. sox9b plays many important roles during development, including the building the heart and brain and is also necessary for skeletal development. At the University of Wisconsin, researchers have found that exposure to contaminants that bind the aryl-hydrocarbon receptor results in the downregulation of sox9b. Loss of sox9b severely disrupts development in zebrafish and causes a life-threatening disorder called campomelic dysplasia (CD) in humans. CD is characterized by cardiovascular, neural and skeletal defects. By studying the roles of genes such as sox9b in zebrafish, scientists hope to better understand normal development in humans as wells as how to treat developmental disorders and diseases.<Br><Br> This image is part of the Life: Magnified collection, which was displayed in the Gateway Gallery at Washington Dulles International Airport June 3, 2014, to January 21, 2015. To see all 46 images in this exhibit, to <a href="https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/life-magnified/Pages/default.aspx">click here</a>.2/18/2022 5:28:52 PM2/18/2022 5:28:52 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 11A_zebrafish fin2_Plavicki_H    High 7560 KB 10/19/2020 2:56 AM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{EA2A80AC-BD59-4A63-8FFC-C5AF94747636}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
343645976This image shows the hierarchical ontology of genes, cellular components and processes derived from large genomic datasets. From Dutkowski et al. <a href= "http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23242164" target="_blank">A gene ontology inferred from molecular networks </a>Nat Biotechnol. 2013 Jan;31(1):38-45. Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3437">image 3437</a>.8/22/2020 4:38:22 PM8/22/2020 4:38:22 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified nexo_image_300dpi_no_text_T    Thumbnail 4 KB 6/3/2016 3:29 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{7D6D8D19-27F0-4C24-82CC-9AD3D499FA8A}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
277145846Under the microscope, an <i>E. coli</i> cell lights up like a fireball. Each bright dot marks a surface protein that tells the bacteria to move toward or away from nearby food and toxins. Using a new imaging technique, researchers can map the proteins one at a time and combine them into a single image. This lets them study patterns within and among protein clusters in bacterial cells, which don't have nuclei or organelles like plant and animal cells. Seeing how the proteins arrange themselves should help researchers better understand how cell signaling works. A movie containing this image was featured in the August 19, 2009, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/09-08-19/index.html#1 target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.8/28/2020 5:59:20 PM8/28/2020 5:59:20 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Using a new imaging technique, researchers can map the proteins one at a time and combine STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{12F702C2-09EA-4026-A4FF-44FEB4FB31A5}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
106939510Many researchers use the mouse <i>(Mus musculus)</i> as a model organism to study mammalian biology. Mice carry out practically all the same life processes as humans and, because of their small size and short generation times, are easily raised in labs. Scientists studying a certain cellular activity or disease can choose from tens of thousands of specially bred strains of mice to select those prone to developing certain tumors, neurological diseases, metabolic disorders, premature aging, or other conditions.8/27/2020 7:27:06 PM8/27/2020 7:27:06 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified F04101GMS_Mice_M    Medium 15 KB 1/28/2021 7:54 AM McCulley, Jennifer (NIH/NIDCD) [C Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{31989528-3FB8-4234-852A-E9BBD592C0F7}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
107039511Microarrays, also called gene chips, are tools that let scientists track the activity of hundreds or thousands of genes simultaneously. For example, researchers can compare the activities of genes in healthy and diseased cells, allowing the scientists to pinpoint which genes and cell processes might be involved in the development of a disease.8/27/2020 8:03:36 PM8/27/2020 8:03:36 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified F04101GMS_microarray_M    Medium 210 KB 1/28/2021 8:00 AM McCulley, Jennifer (NIH/NIDCD Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{4C0AAF59-369C-49E6-BC65-E3134B93CF93}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
235839658The intense X-rays produced by synchrotrons such as the Advanced Photon Source are ideally suited for protein structure determination. Using synchrotron X-rays and advanced computers scientists can determine protein structures at a pace unheard of decade ago.10/29/2020 4:00:37 PM10/29/2020 4:00:37 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified hi_argonne_lab_M    Medium 386 KB 6/3/2016 3:09 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{8C0E485A-7B62-471D-AC12-5F2BB88646E5}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
660146289This animation shows atoms of the HIV capsid, the shell that encloses the virus's genetic material. Scientists determined the exact structure of the capsid using a variety of imaging techniques and analyses. They then entered this data into a supercomputer to produce this image. Learn more in the <a href="https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/pages/Factsheet_StructuralBiology.aspx"> structural biology fact sheet</a>. Related to image <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=3477">3477</a>. 1/28/2021 8:06:44 PM1/28/2021 8:06:44 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Atomic-Level Structure of the HIV Capsid    High 20229 KB 12/10/2020 5:41 PM Walter, Taylor (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{2C77B30F-B214-4301-B475-E0433A651C12}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
572946162The HIV capsid is pear-shaped structure that is made of proteins the virus needs to mature and become infective. The capsid is inside the virus and delivers the virus' genetic information into a human cell. To better understand how the HIV capsid does this feat, scientists have used computer programs to simulate its assembly. This image shows a series of snapshots of the steps that grow the HIV capsid. A model of a complete capsid is shown on the far right of the image for comparison; the green, blue and red colors indicate different configurations of the capsid protein that make up the capsid “shell.” The bar in the left corner represents a length of 20 nanometers, which is less than a tenth the size of the smallest bacterium. Computer models like this also may be used to reconstruct the assembly of the capsids of other important viruses, such as Ebola or the Zika virus. <br><br> The studies reporting this research were published in <a href="http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2016/160513/ncomms11568/full/ncomms11568.html"><i>Nature Communications</i></a> and <a href="http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v469/n7330/full/nature09640.html"><i>Nature</i></a>. <br><br> To learn more about how researchers used computer simulations to track the assembly of the HIV capsid, see <a href=" https://news.uchicago.edu/article/2016/06/14/simulations-describe-hivs-diabolical-delivery-device">this press release from the University of Chicago</a>.12/18/2020 4:10:47 PM12/18/2020 4:10:47 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified HIV capsid synthesis 222px_TransparentBackground-1_S    Thumbnail 127 KB 3/20/2017 9:21 AM Machalek, Alisa STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{C1FD6483-5B69-49FD-9F08-5665166A3E1D}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
231339604The marine bacterium <i>Vibrio harveyi</i> glows when near its kind. This luminescence, which results from biochemical reactions, is part of the chemical communication used by the organisms to assess their own population size and distinguish themselves from other types of bacteria. But <i>V. harveyi</i> only light up when part of a large group. This communication, called quorum sensing, speaks for itself here on a lab dish, where more densely packed areas of the bacteria show up blue. Other types of bacteria use quorum sensing to release toxins, trigger disease, and evade the immune system. Featured in the September 20, 2005, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/05-09-20/#1 target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.10/29/2020 1:05:12 PM10/29/2020 1:05:12 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified colorful_communication_M    Medium 14 KB 6/3/2016 3:08 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{4FCBBDF7-A776-44F7-8D0F-C5A7AB437EA1}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6810477Three fruit fly (<em>Drosophila melanogaster</em>) ovarioles (yellow, blue, and magenta) with egg cells visible inside them. Ovarioles are tubes in the reproductive systems of female insects. Egg cells form at one end of an ovariole and complete their development as they reach the other end, as shown in the yellow wild-type ovariole. This process requires an important protein that is missing in the blue and magenta ovarioles. This image was created using confocal microscopy. <Br><Br> More information on the research that produced this image can be found in the <em> Current Biology</em> paper <a href="https://www.cell.com/current-biology/fulltext/S0960-9822(21)00669-2?_returnURL=https%3A%2F%2Flinkinghub.elsevier.com%2Fretrieve%2Fpii%2FS0960982221006692%3Fshowall%3Dtrue">“Gatekeeper function for Short stop at the ring canals of the <em>Drosophila</em> ovary”</a> by Lu et al. 1/21/2022 3:51:54 PM1/21/2022 3:51:54 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Fruit fly ovarioles_6810_M    Medium 290 KB 2/11/2022 2:16 PM Dolan, Lauren (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{C9C95BC4-65E6-4B68-BC4A-814E3F8B69D5}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6808584Two fruit fly (<em>Drosophila melanogaster</em>) larvae brains with neurons expressing fluorescently tagged tubulin protein. Tubulin makes up strong, hollow fibers called microtubules that play important roles in neuron growth and migration during brain development. This image was captured using confocal microscopy, and the color indicates the position of the neurons within the brain.1/20/2022 7:49:11 PM1/20/2022 7:49:11 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Drosophila 3rd instar larval brain expressing neuronal tubulin-Wen Lu and Vladimir I. Gelfand_M    Medium 175 KB STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{8643DBC3-712E-4596-B178-AE3E38631BAB}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
270841299A blue laser beam turns on a protein that helps this human cancer cell move. Responding to the stimulus, the protein, called Rac1, first creates ruffles at the edge of the cell. Then it stretches the cell forward, following the light like a horse trotting after a carrot on a stick. This new light-based approach can turn Rac1 (and potentially many other proteins) on and off at exact times and places in living cells. By manipulating a protein that controls movement, the technique also offers a new tool to study embryonic development, nerve regeneration and cancer. Featured in the September 16, 2009, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/09-09-16/index.html#1 target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.8/6/2020 4:31:43 PM8/6/2020 4:31:43 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified a protein that controls movement, the technique also offers a new tool to study embryonic A blue laser beam turns on STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{687A0EA7-3610-49D0-AED1-F7F73EBE909C}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
577046182Cell division is an incredibly coordinated process. It not only ensures that the new cells formed during this event have a full set of chromosomes, but also that they are endowed with all the cellular materials, including proteins, lipids and small functional compartments called organelles, that are required for normal cell activity. This proper apportioning of essential cell ingredients helps each cell get off to a running start.<Br><Br> This image shows an electron microscopy (EM) thin section taken at 10,000x magnification of a dividing yeast cell over-expressing the protein ubiquitin, which is involved in protein degradation and recycling. The picture features mother and daughter endosome accumulations (small organelles with internal vesicles), a darkly stained vacuole and a dividing nucleus in close contact with a cadre of lipid droplets (unstained spherical bodies). Other dynamic events are also visible, such as spindle microtubules in the nucleus and endocytic pits at the plasma membrane. <Br><Br>These extensive details were revealed thanks to a preservation method involving high-pressure freezing, freeze-substitution and Lowicryl HM20 embedding. 12/18/2020 6:43:14 PM12/18/2020 6:43:14 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified doa4cs_oeUb_co69a_thumbnail    Thumbnail 2 KB 7/26/2016 12:30 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{F7AE0A8B-16E1-4D6F-95FD-BF2175A028B9}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
270241272A combo of protein structures determined experimentally and computationally shows us the complete metabolic network of a heat-loving bacterium.8/6/2020 4:36:05 PM8/6/2020 4:36:05 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2702_Thermotoga_maritima_and_its_metabolic_network_T    Thumbnail 97 KB 3/29/2019 11:00 AM Constantinides STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{8BCB0A5C-8081-41B2-AEC1-62DCCD78EE99}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
241939755This image of the human brain uses colors and shapes to show neurological differences between two people. The blurred front portion of the brain, associated with complex thought, varies most between the individuals. The blue ovals mark areas of basic function that vary relatively little. Visualizations like this one are part of a project to map complex and dynamic information about the human brain, including genes, enzymes, disease states, and anatomy. The brain maps represent collaborations between neuroscientists and experts in math, statistics, computer science, bioinformatics, imaging, and nanotechnology. Featured in the October 18, 2005, issue of <a href="http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/05-10-18/#1" target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.5/12/2021 8:58:25 PM5/12/2021 8:58:25 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Brain_map_M    Medium 67 KB 6/3/2016 3:10 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C This image of the human brain uses STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{B082809A-5B3D-4BD2-B182-2FFDA2EBAE5B}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
236139660In the determination of protein structures by X-ray crystallography, this unique soft (l = 2.29Å) X-ray source is used to collect anomalous scattering data from protein crystals containing light atoms such as sulfur, calcium, zinc and phosphorous. This data can be used to image the protein.10/29/2020 4:05:09 PM10/29/2020 4:05:09 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified hi_CRXRay_Wang_L    Low 47 KB 6/3/2016 3:09 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{3D72C15B-B2B5-4A71-BC23-09CEE2BAB743}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
675546310Insect brains, like the honeybee brain shown here, are very different in shape from human brains. Despite that, bee and human brains have a lot in common, including many of the genes and neurochemicals they rely on in order to function. The bright-green spots in this image indicate the presence of tyrosine hydroxylase, an enzyme that allows the brain to produce dopamine. Dopamine is involved in many important functions, such as the ability to experience pleasure. This image was captured using confocal microscopy.9/23/2021 3:05:46 PM9/23/2021 3:05:46 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified IGB Bee Brain Robinson Lab_M    Medium 545 KB 4/6/2021 12:27 PM Walter, Taylor (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{A4B72739-220C-4865-ADD4-F79CA8848067}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
374146130The photo shows a confocal microscopy image of perineuronal nets (PNNs), which are specialized extracellular matrix (ECM) structures in the brain. The PNN surrounds some nerve cells in brain regions including the cortex, hippocampus and thalamus. Researchers study the PNN to investigate their involvement stabilizing the extracellular environment and forming nets around nerve cells and synapses in the brain. Abnormalities in the PNNs have been linked to a variety of disorders, including epilepsy and schizophrenia, and they limit a process called neural plasticity in which new nerve connections are formed. To visualize the PNNs, researchers labeled them with Wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA)-fluorescein. Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3742">image 3742</a>.12/17/2020 5:33:10 PM12/17/2020 5:33:10 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Cortex_neuronal_ECM_M    Medium 92 KB 6/3/2016 3:40 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C TEM 5: Soleus muscle ECM on STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{49BF2F89-C3EB-46DB-A682-8EF8BF979760}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
374246131The photo shows a confocal microscopy image of perineuronal nets (PNNs), which are specialized extracellular matrix (ECM) structures in the brain. The PNN surrounds some nerve cells in brain regions including the cortex, hippocampus and thalamus. Researchers study the PNN to investigate their involvement stabilizing the extracellular environment and forming nets around nerve cells and synapses in the brain. Abnormalities in the PNNs have been linked to a variety of disorders, including epilepsy and schizophrenia, and they limit a process called neural plasticity in which new nerve connections are formed. To visualize the PNNs, researchers labeled them with Wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA)-fluorescein. Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3741">image 3741</a>.12/17/2020 5:35:24 PM12/17/2020 5:35:24 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 3742_Cortex_neuronal_ECM_S    Low 128 KB 3/28/2019 4:01 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{FC6C3E72-F217-4DDB-A4D4-6C0B904EC50A}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
233639636Using a supercomputer to simulate the movement of atoms in a ribosome, researchers looked into the core of this protein-making nanomachine and took snapshots. The picture shows an amino acid (green) being delivered by transfer RNA (yellow) into a corridor (purple) in the ribosome. In the corridor, a series of chemical reactions will string together amino acids to make a protein. The research project, which tracked the movement of more than 2.6 million atoms, was the largest computer simulation of a biological structure to date. The results shed light on the manufacturing of proteins and could aid the search for new antibiotics, which typically work by disabling the ribosomes of bacteria. Featured in the November 15, 2005, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/05-11-15/#1 target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.10/29/2020 2:33:42 PM10/29/2020 2:33:42 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified NaturalNanomachine_L    Low 9 KB 6/3/2016 3:09 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Tools and Techniques STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{0F17E42A-6033-4919-866E-9B591004F58D}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131