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2343659This crystal structure shows a conserved hypothetical protein from <i>Mycobacterium tuberculosis</i>. Only 12 other proteins share its sequence homology, and none has a known function. This structure indicates the protein may play a role in metabolic pathways. Featured as one of the August 2007 Protein Structure Initiative Structures of the Month.10/29/2020 2:48:36 PM10/29/2020 2:48:36 PMThis structure indicates the protein may play a role in metabolic pathways Featured as one of the August 2007 Protein Structure Initiative Structures of the Month STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx9990https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{C049B741-42A1-4298-8E5F-15EE784B48B7}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2373468Crystal structure of oligoendopeptidase F, a protein slicing enzyme from <i>Bacillus stearothermophilus</i>, a bacterium that can cause food products to spoil. The crystal was formed using a microfluidic capillary, a device that enables scientists to independently control the parameters for protein crystal nucleation and growth. Featured as one of the July 2007 Protein Structure Initiative Structures of the Month.10/29/2020 4:30:39 PM10/29/2020 4:30:39 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Technologies Center for Gene to 3D Structure/Midwest Center for Structural Genomics Molecular Structures STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx9880https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{0D97FDE5-F4E0-4172-A7C4-8FCFDBC60F26}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
34381142The chemical structure of the morphine molecule8/22/2020 4:44:39 PM8/22/2020 4:44:39 PMMorphine_structure__thumbnail_    Thumbnail 2 KB 6/3/2016 3:29 PM aamishral2 (NIH Morphine_structure_L    High 4772 KB 6/3/2016 3:29 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx10180https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{6EE205B7-C53B-4A56-B1E5-DB767CF5273F}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2340465This is the first structure of a protein derived from the metagenomic sequences collected during the Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling project. The crystal structure shows a barrel protein with a ferredoxin-like fold and a long chain fatty acid in a deep cleft (shaded red). Featured as one of the August 2007 Protein Structure Initiative Structures of the Month.10/29/2020 2:41:27 PM10/29/2020 2:41:27 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2340_jcsg20d6_S    Low 79 KB 3/29/2019 1:45 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C Molecular Structures STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx10180https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{306636AD-6984-4103-B367-87B1EB3474FA}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2342467X-ray structure of a new DNA repair enzyme superfamily representative from the human gastrointestinal bacterium <i>Enterococcus faecalis</i>. European scientists used this structure to generate homologous structures. Featured as the May 2007 Protein Structure Initiative Structure of the Month.10/29/2020 2:46:36 PM10/29/2020 2:46:36 PMEuropean scientists used this structure to generate homologous structures Featured as the May 2007 Protein Structure Initiative Structure of the Month STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx10870https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{985DEF74-B19F-428E-A73F-96B3A80C5557}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2372794Crystal structure of a protein with unknown function from <i>Xanthomonas campestris</i>, a plant pathogen. Eight copies of the protein crystallized to form a ring. Chosen as the December 2007 Protein Structure Initiative Structure of the Month.10/29/2020 4:26:44 PM10/29/2020 4:26:44 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Chosen as the December 2007 Protein Structure Initiative Structure of the Month Molecular Structures STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx8760https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{87B885D1-27EB-4EB7-8EEB-FFD75998D185}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2363787The goal of the PSI is to determine the three-dimensional shapes of a wide range of proteins by solving the structures of representative members of each protein family found in nature. The collection of structures should serve as a valuable resource for biomedical research scientists.10/29/2020 4:12:18 PM10/29/2020 4:12:18 PMhi_gene_to_structure_M    Medium 17 KB 6/3/2016 3:09 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C The collection of structures should serve as a valuable resource for biomedical research STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx11870https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{5707B2E3-09B2-4FAE-824E-FD8FD64AF328}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2748845This ribbon drawing of a protein hand drawn and colored by researcher Jane Richardson in 1981 helped originate the ribbon representation of proteins that is now ubiquitous in molecular graphics. The drawing shows the 3-dimensional structure of the protein triose phosphate isomerase. The green arrows represent the barrel of eight beta strands in this structure and the brown spirals show the protein's eight alpha helices. A black and white version of this drawing originally illustrated a <a href=http://kinemage.biochem.duke.edu/teaching/anatax target="_blank">review article</a> in <i>Advances in Protein Chemistry</i>, volume 34, titled "Anatomy and Taxonomy of Protein Structures." The illustration was selected as Picture of The Day on the English Wikipedia for November 19, 2009. Other important and beautiful images of protein structures by Jane Richardson are available in her <a href=http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Dcrjsr/gallery_of_protein_structure target="_blank">Wikimedia gallery</a>.8/18/2020 7:55:11 PM8/18/2020 7:55:11 PMThe drawing shows the 3-dimensional structure of the protein triose phosphate isomerase barrel of eight beta strands in this structure and the brown spirals show the protein's STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx8980https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{463859B2-279A-4E80-A85C-A2382E815BD5}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3314735Opioid receptors on the surfaces of brain cells are involved in pleasure, pain, addiction, depression, psychosis, and other conditions. The receptors bind to both innate opioids and drugs ranging from hospital anesthetics to opium. Researchers at The Scripps Research Institute, supported by the NIGMS Protein Structure Initiative, determined the first three-dimensional structure of a human opioid receptor, a kappa-opioid receptor. In this illustration, the submicroscopic receptor structure is shown while bound to an agonist (or activator). The structure is superimposed on a poppy flower, the source of opium. From a Scripps Research Institute <a href=http://www.scripps.edu/news/press/20120321stevens.html target="_blank">news release</a>.12/23/2020 4:46:54 PM12/23/2020 4:46:54 PMby the NIGMS Protein Structure Initiative, determined the first three-dimensional structure of a human opioid receptor, a Human opioid receptor structure superimposed on poppy STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx9950https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{4BBF8D4D-E333-41E5-9B54-06A7AA38E085}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2337462Crystal structure of the beta2-adrenergic receptor protein. This is the first known structure of a human G protein-coupled receptor, a large family of proteins that control critical bodily functions and the action of about half of today's pharmaceuticals. Featured as one of the November 2007 Protein Structure Initiative Structures of the Month.10/29/2020 2:35:50 PM10/29/2020 2:35:50 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2337_beta2-adrenergic_T    Thumbnail 108 KB 3/29/2019 1:47 PM Constantinides, Stephen Molecular Structures STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx11080https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{55028E4D-1BE0-45A9-BB7C-A6F9AA03316D}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2365789A global "map of the protein structure universe." The Berkeley Structural Genomics Center has developed a method to visualize the vast universe of protein structures in which proteins of similar structure are located close together and those of different structures far away in the space. This map, constructed using about 500 of the most common protein folds, reveals a highly non-uniform distribution, and shows segregation between four elongated regions corresponding to four different protein classes (shown in four different colors). Such a representation reveals a high-level of organization of the protein structure universe.10/29/2020 4:16:23 PM10/29/2020 4:16:23 PMa representation reveals a high-level of organization of the protein structure universe Map of protein structures 01 Molecular Structures STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx110120https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{2388E2EB-3730-4F33-A049-087CFC2A4AFF}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3307732A study published in March 2012 used cryo-electron microscopy to determine the structure of the DNA replication origin recognition complex (ORC), a semi-circular, protein complex (yellow) that recognizes and binds DNA to start the replication process. The ORC appears to wrap around and bend approximately 70 base pairs of double stranded DNA (red and blue). Also shown is the protein Cdc6 (green), which is also involved in the initiation of DNA replication. The video shows the structure from different angles. From a Brookhaven National Laboratory <a href=http://www.bnl.gov/bnlweb/pubaf/pr/PR_display.asp?prID=1391&template=Today target="_blank">news release</a>, "Study Reveals How Protein Machinery Binds and Wraps DNA to Start Replication." See related image <a href=http://images.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3597><i>3597</i></a>.12/22/2020 11:01:10 PM12/22/2020 11:01:10 PMThe light brown shading represents the structure obtained by cryo-EM The ribbon diagram structures came from X-ray crystallography and were superimposed on the cryo-EM structure STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx10990https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{4E2A15E1-0A1E-4F7D-9AE7-49FFE5103E20}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2341466Model of the enzyme aminopeptidase N from the human pathogen <i>Neisseria meningitidis</i>, which can cause meningitis epidemics. The structure provides insight on the active site of this important molecule.10/29/2020 2:43:00 PM10/29/2020 2:43:00 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2341_joachimiak1_S    Low 133 KB 3/29/2019 1:43 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx120180https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{C0E3C41D-D8EA-4EB0-92FA-CC970965AA6B}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2339464NMR solution structure of a plant protein that may function in host defense. This protein was expressed in a convenient and efficient wheat germ cell-free system. Featured as the June 2007 Protein Structure Initiative Structure of the Month.10/29/2020 2:40:04 PM10/29/2020 2:40:04 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Featured as the June 2007 Protein Structure Initiative Structure of the Month Molecular Structures STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx11070https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{47234FEB-EE1D-4DF6-A666-446A5C2D9E37}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2355596Model of the enzyme Nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase. This enzyme, from the archaebacterium, <i>Pyrococcus furiosus</i>, is expected to be structurally similar to a clinically important human protein called B-cell colony enhancing factor based on amino acid sequence similarities and structure prediction methods. The structure consists of identical protein subunits, each shown in a different color, arranged in a ring.10/29/2020 3:44:23 PM10/29/2020 3:44:23 PMfactor based on amino acid sequence similarities and structure prediction methods The structure consists of identical protein subunits, each shown in a different color STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx123110https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{32F0F10A-7087-466D-BEE4-36238144FEC6}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
58741050Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) has the power to capture details of proteins and other small biological structures at the molecular level.&nbsp; This image shows proteins in the capsid, or outer cover, of bacteriophage P22, a virus that infects the Salmonella bacteria.&nbsp; Each color shows the structure and position of an individual protein in the capsid.&nbsp; Thousands of cryo-EM scans capture the structure and shape of all the individual proteins in the capsid and their position relative to other proteins. A computer model combines these scans into the 3-dimension image shown here.&nbsp; Related to image <a href="/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID2=5875">5875</a>.12/18/2020 9:09:51 PM12/18/2020 9:09:51 PMEach color shows the structure and position of an individual protein in the capsid Thousands of cryo-EM scans capture the structure and shape of all the individual proteins STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx95250https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{B795949D-2B81-40F1-A108-BA57CBB23572}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2351665An NMR solution structure model of the transfer RNA splicing enzyme endonuclease in humans (subunit Sen15). This represents the first structure of a eukaryotic tRNA splicing endonuclease subunit.10/29/2020 3:06:53 PM10/29/2020 3:06:53 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2351_hi_2gw6_S    Low 93 KB 3/29/2019 11:48 AM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx10060https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{95C0D2AD-AB59-4100-83B0-78CA3F50C76E}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
35971089A study published in March 2012 used cryo-electron microscopy to determine the structure of the DNA replication origin recognition complex (ORC), a semi-circular, protein complex (yellow) that recognizes and binds DNA to start the replication process. The ORC appears to wrap around and bend approximately 70 base pairs of double stranded DNA (red and blue). Also shown is the protein Cdc6 (green), which is also involved in the initiation of DNA replication. Related to video <a href=http://images.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3307><i>3307</i></a> that shows the structure from different angles. From a Brookhaven National Laboratory <a href=http://www.bnl.gov/bnlweb/pubaf/pr/PR_display.asp?prID=1391&template=Today target="_blank">news release</a>, "Study Reveals How Protein Machinery Binds and Wraps DNA to Start Replication." 10/19/2020 6:35:19 AM10/19/2020 6:35:19 AMThe light brown shading represents the structure obtained by cryo-EM The ribbon diagram structures came from X-ray crystallography and were superimposed on the cryo-EM structure STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx12480https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{B3B34891-56E7-4C4C-AC4A-53B710F155A1}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3487950A special "messy" region of a potassium ion channel is important in its function.9/8/2020 10:55:58 PM9/8/2020 10:55:58 PMBK_Virtual_structure_M    Medium 253 KB 9/8/2020 6:52 PM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS BK_Virtual_structure_thumbnail    Thumbnail 2 KB 9/8/2020 6:52 PM Harris, Donald STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx109110https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{801B3D99-3943-4B03-9CF6-04BD027510D7}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
67771334A 3D model of the human endoplasmic reticulum membrane protein complex (EMC) that identifies its nine essential subunits. The EMC plays an important role in making membrane proteins, which are essential for all cellular processes. This is the first atomic-level depiction of the EMC. Its structure was obtained using single-particle cryo-electron microscopy.12/6/2021 8:02:51 PM12/6/2021 8:02:51 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified EMC_NIGMSVideoGallery-Lg    High 4824 KB 12/7/2021 10:06 AM Dolan, Lauren (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx96200https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{6B9B0617-6BFC-4A30-8D67-74F630BF8AAD}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2345660Structure of a magnesium transporter protein from an antibiotic-resistant bacterium (<i>Enterococcus faecalis</i>) found in the human gut. Featured as one of the June 2007 Protein Sructure Initiative Structures of the Month.10/29/2020 2:58:36 PM10/29/2020 2:58:36 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2345_nysgrc0618071_thumbnail    Thumbnail 83 KB 3/4/2019 3:32 PM Constantinides, Stephen Molecular Structures STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx10380https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{DE4E47B3-0D83-483C-AC65-F8FE6D24E0B1}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2346661Model of a human protein associated with the adenylyl cyclase, an enzyme involved in intracellular signaling.10/29/2020 3:00:19 PM10/29/2020 3:00:19 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2346_th_1k8f_S    Low 53 KB 3/29/2019 11:50 AM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C protein structure STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx96100https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{B6534242-F2E6-4D37-8A57-C9F8F5724860}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2426677The structure of a gene-regulating zinc finger protein bound to DNA.8/17/2020 9:31:43 PM8/17/2020 9:31:43 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified DesignedZF    High 595 KB 6/3/2016 3:10 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx9670https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{05B06D12-30DC-46F0-97A0-41AAFF3B328B}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
65811067<i>C. elegans</i>, a tiny roundworm, with a ribosomal protein glowing red and muscle fibers glowing green. Researchers used these worms to study a molecular pathway that affects aging. The ribosomal protein is involved in protein translation and may play a role in dietary restriction-induced longevity. Image created using confocal microscopy. <br> View group of roundworms here <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6582">6582</a>. <br> View closeup of roundworms here <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6583">6583</a>. 3/19/2021 8:22:04 PM3/19/2021 8:22:04 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified SingleWorm_M    Medium 28 KB 8/10/2020 8:26 PM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C Molecular Structures STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx74110https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{FD724E86-FCC2-4562-93CD-C85717D1F0FA}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
57291189The HIV capsid is pear-shaped structure that is made of proteins the virus needs to mature and become infective. The capsid is inside the virus and delivers the virus' genetic information into a human cell. To better understand how the HIV capsid does this feat, scientists have used computer programs to simulate its assembly. This image shows a series of snapshots of the steps that grow the HIV capsid. A model of a complete capsid is shown on the far right of the image for comparison; the green, blue and red colors indicate different configurations of the capsid protein that make up the capsid “shell.” The bar in the left corner represents a length of 20 nanometers, which is less than a tenth the size of the smallest bacterium. Computer models like this also may be used to reconstruct the assembly of the capsids of other important viruses, such as Ebola or the Zika virus. <br><br> The studies reporting this research were published in <a href="http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2016/160513/ncomms11568/full/ncomms11568.html"><i>Nature Communications</i></a> and <a href="http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v469/n7330/full/nature09640.html"><i>Nature</i></a>. <br><br> To learn more about how researchers used computer simulations to track the assembly of the HIV capsid, see <a href=" https://news.uchicago.edu/article/2016/06/14/simulations-describe-hivs-diabolical-delivery-device">this press release from the University of Chicago</a>.12/18/2020 4:10:47 PM12/18/2020 4:10:47 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified of the capsid protein that make The HIV capsid is a pear-shaped structure that is made of proteins the virus needs to STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx145110https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{C1FD6483-5B69-49FD-9F08-5665166A3E1D}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2398607A crystal of RNase A protein created for X-ray crystallography, which can reveal detailed, three-dimensional protein structures.8/6/2020 3:59:25 PM8/6/2020 3:59:25 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified f02K_RNase_A1_S    Low 38 KB 9/7/2016 3:20 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx100120https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{E0AEE516-3DB0-4030-B7D3-D192F02C6479}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2494686The structure of the pore-forming protein VDAC-1 from humans. This molecule mediates the flow of products needed for metabolism--in particular the export of ATP--across the outer membrane of mitochondria, the power plants for eukaryotic cells. VDAC-1 is involved in metabolism and the self-destruction of cells--two biological processes central to health. Relates to a <a href=http://www.nigms.nih.gov/News/Results/20080904_announce.htm target="_blank">September 4, 2008 news release</a>.5/9/2022 1:30:14 PM5/9/2022 1:30:14 PMThe structure of the pore-forming protein VDAC-1 from humans Hi Alisa, of course it is also can send you a movie with a rotating structure but this would be about 23 MB. May be STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx9760https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{A65EBB87-F656-47C1-BD27-3175C6C2DBE6}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2491685The structure of the pore-forming protein VDAC-1 from humans. This molecule mediates the flow of products needed for metabolism--in particular the export of ATP--across the outer membrane of mitochondria, the power plants for eukaryotic cells. VDAC-1 is involved in metabolism and the self-destruction of cells--two biological processes central to health. Relates to a <a href=http://www.nigms.nih.gov/News/Results/20080904_announce.htm target="_blank">September 4, 2008 news release</a>.5/9/2022 1:29:10 PM5/9/2022 1:29:10 PMThe structure of the pore-forming protein VDAC-1 from humans Hi Alisa, of course it is also can send you a movie with a rotating structure but this would be about 23 MB. May be STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx10090https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{222705E6-39EE-4459-BCED-2DDEC932367D}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3415542X-ray co-crystal structure of Src kinase bound to a DNA-templated macrocycle inhibitor. Found in the journal, Nature, Chemical Biology 8, 366-374 (2012). Series of seven images. Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3413">image 3413</a> , <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3414">image 3414</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3416">image 3416</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3417">image 3417</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3418">image 3418</a> and <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3419">image 3419</a>.12/23/2020 11:07:01 PM12/23/2020 11:07:01 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified X-ray co-crystal structure of Src kinase bound to a DNA-templated macrocycle inhibitor 3 WE are happy to give you STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx8570https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{BAF7CEA2-E05B-4260-AA04-C2DA7BA3228A}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
65821068Three <i>C. elegans</i>, tiny roundworms, with a ribosomal protein glowing red and muscle fibers glowing green. Researchers used these worms to study a molecular pathway that affects aging. The ribosomal protein is involved in protein translation and may play a role in dietary restriction-induced longevity. Image created using confocal microscopy. <br>View single roundworm here <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6581">6581</a>. <br> View closeup of roundworms here <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6583">6583</a>.3/19/2021 8:20:52 PM3/19/2021 8:20:52 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified ThreeWorms_M    Medium 49 KB 8/10/2020 8:39 PM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C Molecular Structures STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx8180https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{AFFC83D5-1CA9-4F1F-AB09-4C4B88D3E492}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2596707In the top snapshots, the brain of a sleep-deprived fruit fly glows orange, marking high concentrations of a synaptic protein called Bruchpilot (BRP) involved in communication between neurons. The color particularly lights up brain areas associated with learning. By contrast, the bottom images from a well-rested fly show lower levels of the protein. These pictures illustrate the results of an April 2009 study showing that sleep reduces the protein's levels, suggesting that such "downscaling" resets the brain to normal levels of synaptic activity and makes it ready to learn after a restful night. Featured in the May 20, 2009, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/09-05-20/index.html#1 target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.10/30/2020 7:21:43 PM10/30/2020 7:21:43 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified sleep_fly1_L    Low 9 KB 6/3/2016 3:13 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Molecular Structures STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx76170https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{179D8D15-FAF6-4541-9811-87052DBCC0B8}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2571831This video shows the structure of the pore-forming protein VDAC-1 from humans. This molecule mediates the flow of products needed for metabolism--in particular the export of ATP--across the outer membrane of mitochondria, the power plants for eukaryotic cells. VDAC-1 is involved in metabolism and the self-destruction of cells--two biological processes central to health. Relates to a <a href=http://www.nigms.nih.gov/News/Results/20080904_announce.htm target="_blank">September 4, 2008 news release</a>.3/4/2022 7:28:57 PM3/4/2022 7:28:57 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified also can send you a movie with a rotating structure but this would be about 23 MB. May be Molecular Structures STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx107150https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{7A695641-F7C2-4B40-8E22-3DC1F1AF3080}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2431681Cells in an early-stage fruit fly embryo, showing the DIAP1 protein (pink), an inhibitor of apoptosis.8/18/2020 9:15:52 PM8/18/2020 9:15:52 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Fruit_fly_embryo__DIAP1_    High 2732 KB 6/3/2016 3:11 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx178160https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{8EE49691-A593-4D52-A276-0812121F89C5}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
66011323This animation shows atoms of the HIV capsid, the shell that encloses the virus's genetic material. Scientists determined the exact structure of the capsid using a variety of imaging techniques and analyses. They then entered this data into a supercomputer to produce this image. Related to image <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=3477">3477</a>. 11/14/2023 1:23:27 PM11/14/2023 1:23:27 PMAtomic-Level Structure of the HIV Capsid    High 20229 KB 12/10/2020 5:41 PM atomic-level structure of HIV capsid_thumbnail    Thumbnail 12 KB 12/10/2020 STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx10380https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{2C77B30F-B214-4301-B475-E0433A651C12}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
67661221CCD-1 is an enzyme produced by the bacterium <em>Clostridioides difficile</em> that helps it resist antibiotics. Using X-ray crystallography, researchers determined the structure of a CCD-1 molecule and a molecule of the antibiotic cefotaxime bound together. The structure revealed that CCD-1 provides extensive hydrogen bonding and stabilization of the antibiotic in the active site, leading to efficient degradation of the antibiotic. <Br><Br> Related to images <a href="/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID2=6764">6764</a>, <a href="/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID2=6765">6765</a>, and <a href="/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID2=6767">6767</a>.5/16/2022 3:24:55 PM5/16/2022 3:24:55 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified of Structural Biology paper “The crystal structures of CDD-1, the intrinsic class D Clyde Smith got back to me about STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx8880https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{F9E63C48-B791-4F6D-972F-72242ED07995}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
67671222CCD-1 is an enzyme produced by the bacterium <em>Clostridioides difficile</em> that helps it resist antibiotics. Using X-ray crystallography, researchers determined the structure of a complex between CCD-1 and the antibiotic cefotaxime (purple, yellow, and blue molecule). The structure revealed that CCD-1 provides extensive hydrogen bonding (shown as dotted lines) and stabilization of the antibiotic in the active site, leading to efficient degradation of the antibiotic. <Br><Br> Related to images <a href="/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID2=6764">6764</a>, <a href="/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID2=6765">6765</a>, and <a href="/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID2=6766">6766</a>.5/16/2022 3:26:06 PM5/16/2022 3:26:06 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified of Structural Biology paper “The crystal structures of CDD-1, the intrinsic class D STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx90100https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{DC0297AE-E276-460D-AA55-B9F0AD00D6B9}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2423675Network diagram showing a map of protein-protein interactions in a yeast (<i>Saccharomyces cerevisiae</i>) cell. This cluster includes 78 percent of the proteins in the yeast proteome. The color of a node represents the phenotypic effect of removing the corresponding protein (red, lethal; green, nonlethal; orange, slow growth; yellow, unknown).8/17/2020 9:20:50 PM8/17/2020 9:20:50 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified protein_map182    High 229 KB 6/3/2016 3:10 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C structure STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx84100https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{F93DC033-4F3F-4368-8211-AD3F2769B90F}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3362873The receptor is shown bound to an antagonist, ML056.12/23/2020 5:44:20 PM12/23/2020 5:44:20 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified S1P1_1300x1500_magenta1_S    Low 72 KB 8/30/2016 1:06 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C Molecular Structures STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx74170https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{852AAFA6-A880-467D-9088-0733A0FA3CBA}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2560891Histone proteins loop together with double-stranded DNA to form a structure that resembles beads on a string. See image 2561 for a labeled version of this illustration. Featured in <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/thenewgenetics/ target="_blank"><i>The New Genetics</i></a>.10/23/2020 7:26:17 PM10/23/2020 7:26:17 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Histones_S    Low 54 KB 8/26/2016 3:14 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx102100https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{4129A352-BCAF-467E-A2CB-ECE14F38F669}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
37581034Dengue virus is a mosquito-borne illness that infects millions of people in the tropics and subtropics each year. Like many viruses, dengue is enclosed by a protective membrane. The proteins that span this membrane play an important role in the life cycle of the virus. Scientists used cryo-EM to determine the structure of a dengue virus at a 3.5-angstrom resolution to reveal how the membrane proteins undergo major structural changes as the virus matures and infects a host. The image shows a side view of the structure of a protein composed of two smaller proteins, called E and M. Each E and M contributes two molecules to the overall protein structure (called a heterotetramer), which is important for assembling and holding together the viral membrane, i.e., the shell that surrounds the genetic material of the dengue virus. The dengue protein's structure has revealed some portions in the protein that might be good targets for developing medications that could be used to combat dengue virus infections. To learn more about cryo-EM, see the blog post <a href="https://biobeat.nigms.nih.gov/2016/02/cryo-electron-microscopy-reveals-molecules-in-ever-greater-detail/">Cryo-Electron Microscopy Reveals Molecules in Ever Greater Detail.</a> For a video of the entire virus rotating, see <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3748"> video 3748</a>, and for a still image of the virus, see <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3756">image 3756</a>.12/17/2020 6:24:54 PM12/17/2020 6:24:54 PMThe image shows a side view of the structure of a protein composed of two smaller proteins about the video of the dengue virus structure you had determined by cryo-EM and which is STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx78100https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{CBF115CF-91A9-47A3-81F0-0C4CDB1F4451}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
35731155Scientists revealed a detailed image of the genetic defect that causes myotonic dystrophy type 2 and used that information to design drug candidates to counteract the disease. More information about the research behind this image can be found in a <a href="http://biobeat.nigms.nih.gov/2014/01/targeting-toxic-rna-molecules-in-muscular-dystrophy/" target=_blank>Biomedical Beat</a> Blog posting from January 2014.10/5/2020 5:50:20 AM10/5/2020 5:50:20 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 3573_Disney_acsimage_thumbnail    Thumbnail 57 KB 3/12/2019 12:25 PM Constantinides structure, model, 3d STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx10870https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{23107167-597E-46A9-BAF0-3B572CEF8896}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
68991301High-resolution time lapse of epithelial (skin) cell migration and wound healing. It shows an image taken every 13 seconds over the course of almost 14 minutes. The images were captured with quantitative orientation-independent differential interference contrast (DIC) microscope (left) and a conventional DIC microscope (right). <Br><Br>More information about the research that produced this video can be found in the <em>Journal of Microscopy</em> paper <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jmi.12682/">“An Orientation-Independent DIC Microscope Allows High Resolution Imaging of Epithelial Cell Migration and Wound Healing in a Cnidarian Model”</a> by Malamy and Shribak. 6/30/2022 4:45:48 PM6/30/2022 4:45:48 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified circularlamellipodia    High 17708 KB 6/30/2022 3:03 PM Crowley, Rachel (NIH/NIGMS) [E STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx8270https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{497BC427-08F6-402E-B25B-3FF48F096460}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
37711039Viruses have been the foes of animals and other organisms for time immemorial. For almost as long, they've stayed well hidden from view because they are so tiny (they aren't even cells, so scientists call the individual virus a "particle"). This image shows a molecular model of a particle of the Rous sarcoma virus, a virus that infects and sometimes causes cancer in chickens. In the background is a photo of red blood cells. The particle shown is "immature" (not yet capable of infecting new cells) because it has just budded from an infected chicken cell and entered the bird's bloodstream. The outer shell of the immature virus is made up of a regular assembly of large proteins (shown in red) that are linked together with short protein molecules called peptides (green). This outer shell covers and protects the proteins (blue) that form the inner shell of the particle. But as you can see, the protective armor of the immature virus contains gaping holes. As the particle matures, the short peptides are removed and the large proteins rearrange, fusing together into a solid sphere capable of infecting new cells. While still immature, the particle is vulnerable to drugs that block its development. Knowing the structure of the immature particle may help scientists develop better medications against RSV and similar viruses in humans. Scientists used sophisticated computational tools to reconstruct the RSV atomic structure by crunching various data on the RSV proteins to simulate the entire structure of immature RSV. For more on RSV and how researchers revealed its delicate structure, see the NIH director's blog post <a href="https://directorsblog.nih.gov/2016/04/14/snapshots-of-life-imperfect-but-beautiful-intruder/">Snapshots of Life: Imperfect but Beautiful Intruder.</a>12/17/2020 6:39:16 PM12/17/2020 6:39:16 PMtools to reconstruct the RSV atomic structure by crunching various data on the RSV proteins to simulate the entire structure of immature RSV STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx100140https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{A147967A-CD83-453D-8FF9-DC930253A9F5}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2521495Enzymes convert substrates into products very quickly. Featured in <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/chemhealth/ target="_blank"><i>The Chemistry of Health</i></a>.3/4/2022 8:04:03 PM3/4/2022 8:04:03 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Enzymes_Convert_Subtrates_into_Products1_S    Low 35 KB 9/7/2016 2:13 PM Molecular Structures structure STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx114100https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{26AC0864-644E-4D34-999F-8F2F718486FB}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2402795A crystal of RNase A protein created for X-ray crystallography, which can reveal detailed, three-dimensional protein structures.8/6/2020 6:44:52 PM8/6/2020 6:44:52 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified f06D_RNase_A1_S    Low 65 KB 9/7/2016 3:26 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx6750https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{84664409-B084-46D1-9095-ED7222988EF4}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
36891105A computer-generated sketch of a DNA origami folded into a flower-and-bird structure. Image is featured on Biomedical Beat blog post <a href="http://biobeat.nigms.nih.gov/2015/10/cool-image-dna-origami" target=_blank>Cool Image: DNA Origami</a>. See also related <a href="http://images.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3690" target=_blank>image 3690</a> .12/2/2020 7:28:25 PM12/2/2020 7:28:25 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified DNA_origami_sketch_Dr._Hao_Yan    High 148 KB 8/30/2016 12:15 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx9060https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{D7940990-A7A0-4D3F-ABCB-52B5C2BC08C9}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2367790A global "map of the protein structure universe" indicating the positions of specific proteins. The preponderance of small, less-structured proteins near the origin, with the more highly structured, large proteins towards the ends of the axes, may suggest the evolution of protein structures.10/29/2020 4:18:37 PM10/29/2020 4:18:37 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified hi_map500examples_L    Low 82 KB 6/3/2016 3:09 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Molecular Structures STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx9960https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{8B5616E0-C0D5-468B-ACDC-A2D314BF8A73}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
36601173Ribbon diagram showing the structure of Ribonuclease P with tRNA.2/4/2020 8:55:06 PM2/4/2020 8:55:06 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Ribonuclease_P    High 468 KB 6/3/2016 3:38 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx9090https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{97A0FB19-2CBE-4253-A201-601EC0520575}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
63521309This image shows how the CRISPR surveillance complex is disabled by two copies of anti-CRISPR protein AcrF1 (red) and one AcrF2 (light green). These anti-CRISPRs block access to the CRISPR RNA (green tube) preventing the surveillance complex from scanning and targeting invading viral DNA for destruction. 12/21/2020 5:09:58 PM12/21/2020 5:09:58 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified CRISPR 2 of 2 NRAMM    High Structure Reveals Mechanisms of Viral Suppressors that Intercept a CRISPR RNA-Guided STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx93100https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{152D7892-75BF-4DA9-913D-B1FCC618DA85}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2387673A model of thymidylate synthase complementing protein from <i>Thermotoga maritime</i>.10/29/2020 4:55:29 PM10/29/2020 4:55:29 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2387_th_tm04491_thumbnail    Thumbnail 64 KB 3/12/2019 11:53 AM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx106130https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{C813EBA4-E90A-4989-BB0C-B98FA669BD0A}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131