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236339663The goal of the PSI is to determine the three-dimensional shapes of a wide range of proteins by solving the structures of representative members of each protein family found in nature. The collection of structures should serve as a valuable resource for biomedical research scientists.10/29/2020 4:12:18 PM10/29/2020 4:12:18 PMhi_gene_to_structure_M    Medium 17 KB 6/3/2016 3:09 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C The collection of structures should serve as a valuable resource for biomedical research STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{5707B2E3-09B2-4FAE-824E-FD8FD64AF328}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
234239642X-ray structure of a new DNA repair enzyme superfamily representative from the human gastrointestinal bacterium <i>Enterococcus faecalis</i>. European scientists used this structure to generate homologous structures. Featured as the May 2007 Protein Structure Initiative Structure of the Month.10/29/2020 2:46:36 PM10/29/2020 2:46:36 PMEuropean scientists used this structure to generate homologous structures Featured as the May 2007 Protein Structure Initiative Structure of the Month STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{985DEF74-B19F-428E-A73F-96B3A80C5557}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
236539665A global "map of the protein structure universe." The Berkeley Structural Genomics Center has developed a method to visualize the vast universe of protein structures in which proteins of similar structure are located close together and those of different structures far away in the space. This map, constructed using about 500 of the most common protein folds, reveals a highly non-uniform distribution, and shows segregation between four elongated regions corresponding to four different protein classes (shown in four different colors). Such a representation reveals a high-level of organization of the protein structure universe.10/29/2020 4:16:23 PM10/29/2020 4:16:23 PMa representation reveals a high-level of organization of the protein structure universe Map of protein structures 01 Molecular Structures STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{2388E2EB-3730-4F33-A049-087CFC2A4AFF}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
274843344This ribbon drawing of a protein hand drawn and colored by researcher Jane Richardson in 1981 helped originate the ribbon representation of proteins that is now ubiquitous in molecular graphics. The drawing shows the 3-dimensional structure of the protein triose phosphate isomerase. The green arrows represent the barrel of eight beta strands in this structure and the brown spirals show the protein's eight alpha helices. A black and white version of this drawing originally illustrated a <a href=http://kinemage.biochem.duke.edu/teaching/anatax target="_blank">review article</a> in <i>Advances in Protein Chemistry</i>, volume 34, titled "Anatomy and Taxonomy of Protein Structures." The illustration was selected as Picture of The Day on the English Wikipedia for November 19, 2009. Other important and beautiful images of protein structures by Jane Richardson are available in her <a href=http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Dcrjsr/gallery_of_protein_structure target="_blank">Wikimedia gallery</a>.8/18/2020 7:55:11 PM8/18/2020 7:55:11 PMThe drawing shows the 3-dimensional structure of the protein triose phosphate isomerase barrel of eight beta strands in this structure and the brown spirals show the protein's STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{463859B2-279A-4E80-A85C-A2382E815BD5}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
234339643This crystal structure shows a conserved hypothetical protein from <i>Mycobacterium tuberculosis</i>. Only 12 other proteins share its sequence homology, and none has a known function. This structure indicates the protein may play a role in metabolic pathways. Featured as one of the August 2007 Protein Structure Initiative Structures of the Month.10/29/2020 2:48:36 PM10/29/2020 2:48:36 PMThis structure indicates the protein may play a role in metabolic pathways Featured as one of the August 2007 Protein Structure Initiative Structures of the Month STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{C049B741-42A1-4298-8E5F-15EE784B48B7}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
233739637Crystal structure of the beta2-adrenergic receptor protein. This is the first known structure of a human G protein-coupled receptor, a large family of proteins that control critical bodily functions and the action of about half of today's pharmaceuticals. Featured as one of the November 2007 Protein Structure Initiative Structures of the Month.10/29/2020 2:35:50 PM10/29/2020 2:35:50 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2337_beta2-adrenergic_T    Thumbnail 108 KB 3/29/2019 1:47 PM Constantinides, Stephen Molecular Structures STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{55028E4D-1BE0-45A9-BB7C-A6F9AA03316D}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
234039640This is the first structure of a protein derived from the metagenomic sequences collected during the Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling project. The crystal structure shows a barrel protein with a ferredoxin-like fold and a long chain fatty acid in a deep cleft (shaded red). Featured as one of the August 2007 Protein Structure Initiative Structures of the Month.10/29/2020 2:41:27 PM10/29/2020 2:41:27 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2340_jcsg20d6_S    Low 79 KB 3/29/2019 1:45 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C Molecular Structures STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{306636AD-6984-4103-B367-87B1EB3474FA}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
250839814Proteins are made of amino acids hooked end-to-end like beads on a necklace. To become active, proteins must twist and fold into their final, or "native," conformation." A protein's final shape enables it to accomplish its function. Featured in <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/structlife/ target="_blank"><i>The Structures of Life</i></a>.9/18/2020 6:06:49 PM9/18/2020 6:06:49 PM/education/Booklets/The-Structures-of-Life/Pages/Home.aspx"><em>The Structures of Life</em The Structures of Life page 3 Molecular Structures structure STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{975CBFB7-871F-4D5C-8451-06C1200425BA}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
237339671Crystal structure of oligoendopeptidase F, a protein slicing enzyme from <i>Bacillus stearothermophilus</i>, a bacterium that can cause food products to spoil. The crystal was formed using a microfluidic capillary, a device that enables scientists to independently control the parameters for protein crystal nucleation and growth. Featured as one of the July 2007 Protein Structure Initiative Structures of the Month.10/29/2020 4:30:39 PM10/29/2020 4:30:39 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Technologies Center for Gene to 3D Structure/Midwest Center for Structural Genomics Molecular Structures STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{0D97FDE5-F4E0-4172-A7C4-8FCFDBC60F26}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
236739666A global "map of the protein structure universe" indicating the positions of specific proteins. The preponderance of small, less-structured proteins near the origin, with the more highly structured, large proteins towards the ends of the axes, may suggest the evolution of protein structures.10/29/2020 4:18:37 PM10/29/2020 4:18:37 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified hi_map500examples_L    Low 82 KB 6/3/2016 3:09 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Molecular Structures STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{8B5616E0-C0D5-468B-ACDC-A2D314BF8A73}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
234539644Structure of a magnesium transporter protein from an antibiotic-resistant bacterium (<i>Enterococcus faecalis</i>) found in the human gut. Featured as one of the June 2007 Protein Sructure Initiative Structures of the Month.10/29/2020 2:58:36 PM10/29/2020 2:58:36 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2345_nysgrc0618071_thumbnail    Thumbnail 83 KB 3/4/2019 3:32 PM Constantinides, Stephen Molecular Structures STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{DE4E47B3-0D83-483C-AC65-F8FE6D24E0B1}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
343845978The chemical structure of the morphine molecule8/22/2020 4:44:39 PM8/22/2020 4:44:39 PMMorphine_structure__thumbnail_    Thumbnail 2 KB 6/3/2016 3:29 PM aamishral2 (NIH Morphine_structure_S    Low 24 KB 6/3/2016 3:29 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{6EE205B7-C53B-4A56-B1E5-DB767CF5273F}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
330745909A study published in March 2012 used cryo-electron microscopy to determine the structure of the DNA replication origin recognition complex (ORC), a semi-circular, protein complex (yellow) that recognizes and binds DNA to start the replication process. The ORC appears to wrap around and bend approximately 70 base pairs of double stranded DNA (red and blue). Also shown is the protein Cdc6 (green), which is also involved in the initiation of DNA replication. The video shows the structure from different angles. From a Brookhaven National Laboratory <a href=http://www.bnl.gov/bnlweb/pubaf/pr/PR_display.asp?prID=1391&template=Today target="_blank">news release</a>, "Study Reveals How Protein Machinery Binds and Wraps DNA to Start Replication." See related image <a href=http://images.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3597><i>3597</i></a>.12/22/2020 11:01:10 PM12/22/2020 11:01:10 PMThe light brown shading represents the structure obtained by cryo-EM The ribbon diagram structures came from X-ray crystallography and were superimposed on the cryo-EM structure STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{4E2A15E1-0A1E-4F7D-9AE7-49FFE5103E20}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
233939639NMR solution structure of a plant protein that may function in host defense. This protein was expressed in a convenient and efficient wheat germ cell-free system. Featured as the June 2007 Protein Structure Initiative Structure of the Month.10/29/2020 2:40:04 PM10/29/2020 2:40:04 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Featured as the June 2007 Protein Structure Initiative Structure of the Month Molecular Structures STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{47234FEB-EE1D-4DF6-A666-446A5C2D9E37}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
239539698Crystals of fungal lipase protein created for X-ray crystallography, which can reveal detailed, three-dimensional protein structures.10/29/2020 4:59:29 PM10/29/2020 4:59:29 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified f02G_fungal_lipase1_S    Low 35 KB 9/7/2016 3:09 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{C8E0FF94-6FAA-4237-A337-7029979B87B4}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
578046188Ribosomes are complex machines made up of more than 50 proteins and three or four strands of genetic material called ribosomal RNA (rRNA). The busy cellular machines make proteins, which are critical to almost every structure and function in the cell. To do so, they read following protein-building instructions, which come as strands of messenger RNA. Ribosomes are found in all forms of cellular life—people, plants, animals, even bacteria. This illustration of a bacterial ribosome was produced using detailed information about the position of every atom in the complex. Several antibiotic medicines work by disrupting bacterial ribosomes but leaving human ribosomes alone. Scientists are carefully comparing human and bacterial ribosomes to spot differences between the two. Structures that are present only in the bacterial version could serve as targets for new antibiotic medications.12/18/2020 8:00:42 PM12/18/2020 8:00:42 PMStructures that are present only in the bacterial version could serve as targets for new make proteins, which are critical to almost every structure and function in the cell STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{AFD33B76-302D-4052-9726-239615EBB6FE}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
237239670Crystal structure of a protein with unknown function from <i>Xanthomonas campestris</i>, a plant pathogen. Eight copies of the protein crystallized to form a ring. Chosen as the December 2007 Protein Structure Initiative Structure of the Month.10/29/2020 4:26:44 PM10/29/2020 4:26:44 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Chosen as the December 2007 Protein Structure Initiative Structure of the Month Molecular Structures STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{87B885D1-27EB-4EB7-8EEB-FFD75998D185}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
334445924Researchers have created artificial cilia that wave like the real thing. Zvonimir Dogic and his Brandeis University colleagues combined just a few cilia proteins to create cilia that are able to wave and sweep material around--although more slowly and simply than real ones. The researchers are using the lab-made cilia to study how the structures coordinate their movements and what happens when they don't move properly. Featured in the August 18, 2011, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/11-08-18/#1 target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.12/23/2020 5:39:06 PM12/23/2020 5:39:06 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified the lab-made cilia to study how the structures coordinate their movements and what happens Molecular Structures STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{DF410754-C0AA-49ED-A56B-13204AB6771A}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
239239696A crystal of sheep hemoglobin protein created for X-ray crystallography, which can reveal detailed, three-dimensional protein structures.10/29/2020 4:58:13 PM10/29/2020 4:58:13 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified f02A_sheep_hemoglobin_S    Low 50 KB 9/7/2016 3:07 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{1FAC4EF0-38F5-4FC0-9A20-47A56101DC30}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
251339823HIV is a retrovirus, a type of virus that carries its genetic material not as DNA but as RNA. Long before anyone had heard of HIV, researchers in labs all over the world studied retroviruses, tracing out their life cycle and identifying the key proteins the viruses use to infect cells. When HIV was identified as a retrovirus, these studies gave AIDS researchers an immediate jump-start. The previously identified viral proteins became initial drug targets. See images <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=2514">2514</a> and <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=2515">2515</a> for labeled versions of this illustration. Featured in <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/structlife/ target="_blank"><i>The Structures of Life</i></a>.9/25/2020 4:26:31 PM9/25/2020 4:26:31 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2513thumb    Thumbnail 44 KB 6/3/2016 3:12 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C The Structures of Life pages 36-37 STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{C07EF89B-BA3A-4BD2-979B-95B3B2A80BF9}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
251439831HIV is a retrovirus, a type of virus that carries its genetic material not as DNA but as RNA. Long before anyone had heard of HIV, researchers in labs all over the world studied retroviruses, tracing out their life cycle and identifying the key proteins the viruses use to infect cells. When HIV was identified as a retrovirus, these studies gave AIDS researchers an immediate jump-start. The previously identified viral proteins became initial drug targets. See images <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=2513">2513</a> and <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=2515">2515</a> for other versions of this illustration. Featured in <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/structlife/ target="_blank"><i>The Structures of Life</i></a>.9/25/2020 4:29:40 PM9/25/2020 4:29:40 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size /education/Booklets/The-Structures-of-Life/Pages/Home.aspx"><em>The Structures of Life</em The Structures of Life pages 36-37 Life STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{7C26D3D2-FF70-420C-A0BC-1E2725806E59}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
251539834HIV is a retrovirus, a type of virus that carries its genetic material not as DNA but as RNA. Long before anyone had heard of HIV, researchers in labs all over the world studied retroviruses, tracing out their life cycle and identifying the key proteins the viruses use to infect cells. When HIV was identified as a retrovirus, these studies gave AIDS researchers an immediate jump-start. The previously identified viral proteins became initial drug targets. See images <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=2513">2513</a> and <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=2514">2514</a> for other versions of this illustration. Featured in <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/structlife/ target="_blank"><i>The Structures of Life</i></a>.9/25/2020 4:31:12 PM9/25/2020 4:31:12 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified HIV is a retrovirus, a type of virus that carries its genetic material not as DNA The Structures of Life pages 36-37 STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{E2EE0E54-49B2-4B79-BBC9-C7F4E1589956}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
348746002A special "messy" region of a potassium ion channel is important in its function.9/8/2020 10:55:58 PM9/8/2020 10:55:58 PMBK_Virtual_structure_M    Medium 253 KB 9/8/2020 6:52 PM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS BK_Virtual_structure_thumbnail    Thumbnail 2 KB 9/8/2020 6:52 PM Harris, Donald STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{801B3D99-3943-4B03-9CF6-04BD027510D7}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
587446209Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) has the power to capture details of proteins and other small biological structures at the molecular level.&nbsp; This image shows proteins in the capsid, or outer cover, of bacteriophage P22, a virus that infects the Salmonella bacteria.&nbsp; Each color shows the structure and position of an individual protein in the capsid.&nbsp; Thousands of cryo-EM scans capture the structure and shape of all the individual proteins in the capsid and their position relative to other proteins. A computer model combines these scans into the 3-dimension image shown here.&nbsp; Related to image <a href="/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID2=5875">5875</a>.12/18/2020 9:09:51 PM12/18/2020 9:09:51 PMEach color shows the structure and position of an individual protein in the capsid Thousands of cryo-EM scans capture the structure and shape of all the individual proteins STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{B795949D-2B81-40F1-A108-BA57CBB23572}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
253439907Kinases are enzymes that add phosphate groups (red-yellow structures) to proteins (green), assigning the proteins a code. In this reaction, an intermediate molecule called ATP (adenosine triphosphate) donates a phosphate group from itself, becoming ADP (adenosine diphosphate). Featured in <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/medbydesign/ target="_blank"><i>Medicines By Design</i></a>.10/9/2020 4:29:38 PM10/9/2020 4:29:38 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Kinases are enzymes that add phosphate groups (red-yellow structures) to proteins (green), assigning the proteins a STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{6B9880E5-B566-4FB6-97AF-EE340324EDA2}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
278245850This is a magnified view of an <i>Arabidopsis thaliana</i> leaf after several days of infection with the pathogen <i>Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis</i>. The pathogen's blue hyphae grow throughout the leaf. On the leaf's edges, stalk-like structures called sporangiophores are beginning to mature and will release the pathogen's spores. Inside the leaf, the large, deep blue spots are structures called oopsorangia, also full of spores. Compare this response to that shown in Image 2781. Jeff Dangl has been funded by NIGMS to study the interactions between pathogens and hosts that allow or suppress infection.8/28/2020 7:07:55 PM8/28/2020 7:07:55 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified DIsease_susceptible_leaf_M    Medium 90 KB 6/3/2016 3:17 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{CF73689F-1739-49D4-8908-8681E9052954}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
274142920Like a strand of white pearls, DNA wraps around an assembly of special proteins called histones (colored) to form the nucleosome, a structure responsible for regulating genes and condensing DNA strands to fit into the cell's nucleus. Researchers once thought that nucleosomes regulated gene activity through their histone tails (dotted lines), but a 2010 study revealed that the structures' core also plays a role. The finding sheds light on how gene expression is regulated and how abnormal gene regulation can lead to cancer. Featured in the May 19, 2010, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/10-05-19/index.html#1 target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.8/18/2020 6:57:42 PM8/18/2020 6:57:42 PMto form the nucleosome, a structure responsible for regulating genes and condensing DNA dotted lines), but a 2010 study revealed that the structures' core also plays a role STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{C3ADC02D-DA98-4D44-899B-1EA1E1D08A0A}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
235539653Model of the enzyme Nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase. This enzyme, from the archaebacterium, <i>Pyrococcus furiosus</i>, is expected to be structurally similar to a clinically important human protein called B-cell colony enhancing factor based on amino acid sequence similarities and structure prediction methods. The structure consists of identical protein subunits, each shown in a different color, arranged in a ring.10/29/2020 3:44:23 PM10/29/2020 3:44:23 PMfactor based on amino acid sequence similarities and structure prediction methods The structure consists of identical protein subunits, each shown in a different color STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{32F0F10A-7087-466D-BEE4-36238144FEC6}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
253539908Kinases are enzymes that add phosphate groups (red-yellow structures) to proteins (green), assigning the proteins a code. In this reaction, an intermediate molecule called ATP (adenosine triphosphate) donates a phosphate group from itself, becoming ADP (adenosine diphosphate). Featured in <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/medbydesign/ target="_blank"><i>Medicines By Design</i></a>.10/9/2020 4:31:52 PM10/9/2020 4:31:52 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Kinases_with_labels_S    Low 35 KB 9/7/2016 2:18 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{ADD06B1C-BD34-4115-BD3F-80BC561D9BD9}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
657746270A 3D reconstruction of a transient receptor potential channel called TRPV5 that was created based on cryo-electron microscopy images. TRPV5 is primarily found in kidney cells and is essential for reabsorbing calcium into the blood.8/10/2020 11:36:21 PM8/10/2020 11:36:21 PMCurrently, her laboratory is using cryo-EM to determine TRPV5 channel structures in conditions that better mimic those found in the body, including the presence STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{D77DB5BD-102C-43F3-9C74-4F2555FBCC79}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
235139649An NMR solution structure model of the transfer RNA splicing enzyme endonuclease in humans (subunit Sen15). This represents the first structure of a eukaryotic tRNA splicing endonuclease subunit.10/29/2020 3:06:53 PM10/29/2020 3:06:53 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2351_hi_2gw6_S    Low 93 KB 3/29/2019 11:48 AM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{95C0D2AD-AB59-4100-83B0-78CA3F50C76E}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
353946024Molecular model of the struture of heme. Heme is a small, flat molecule with an iron ion (dark red) at its center. Heme is an essential component of hemoglobin, the protein in blood that carries oxygen throughout our bodies. This image first appeared in the <a href="http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/findings/sept13/hooked-on-heme.asp">September 2013 issue of Findings Magazine</a>.9/27/2020 4:35:34 AM9/27/2020 4:35:34 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Structure of heme, top view Hi Sharon, The two heme structures can be made public Molecular Structures STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{729ADC80-00C3-4C6B-94AA-8B287AF40865}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
354046025Molecular model of the struture of heme. Heme is a small, flat molecule with an iron ion (dark red) at its center. Heme is an essential component of hemoglobin, the protein in blood that carries oxygen throughout our bodies. This image first appeared in the <a href="http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/findings/sept13/hooked-on-heme.asp">September 2013 issue of Findings Magazine</a>.9/27/2020 4:37:18 AM9/27/2020 4:37:18 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Structure of heme, side view Hi Sharon, The two heme structures can be made public Molecular Structures STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{9FCDED8F-E0AF-4AEA-841E-3BEB17C57CDC}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
332745914This 1 1/2-minute video animation was produced for chemical biologist Stuart Schreiber's lab page. Link to video: http://www.broadinstitute.org/chembio/lab_schreiber/anims/animations/smdbFold.php. The animation shows how diverse chemical structures can be produced in the lab.12/23/2020 5:04:14 PM12/23/2020 5:04:14 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified PERMISSION: From: Eric Keller [mailto:bloopatone@gmail.com] Sent: Friday, March 30, 2012 11:55 PM To: Machalek, Alisa Zapp (NIH/NIGMS) [E] Subject: Re: seeking STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{12226E85-CC5E-44C7-A30F-0836917A55B6}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
366046098Ribbon diagram showing the structure of Ribonuclease P with tRNA.2/4/2020 8:55:06 PM2/4/2020 8:55:06 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Ribonuclease_P    High 468 KB 6/3/2016 3:38 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{97A0FB19-2CBE-4253-A201-601EC0520575}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
233839638Model of a member from the Tex protein family, which is implicated in transcriptional regulation and highly conserved in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. The structure shows significant homology to a human transcription elongation factor that may regulate multiple steps in mRNA synthesis.10/29/2020 2:37:40 PM10/29/2020 2:37:40 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified burleyd    Thumbnail 7 KB 6/3/2016 3:09 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Molecular Structures protein structure STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{35294316-7B85-4707-83F4-B824CBA718BB}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
234139641Model of the enzyme aminopeptidase N from the human pathogen <i>Neisseria meningitidis</i>, which can cause meningitis epidemics. The structure provides insight on the active site of this important molecule.10/29/2020 2:43:00 PM10/29/2020 2:43:00 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2341_joachimiak1_S    Low 133 KB 3/29/2019 1:43 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{C0E3C41D-D8EA-4EB0-92FA-CC970965AA6B}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
359746053A study published in March 2012 used cryo-electron microscopy to determine the structure of the DNA replication origin recognition complex (ORC), a semi-circular, protein complex (yellow) that recognizes and binds DNA to start the replication process. The ORC appears to wrap around and bend approximately 70 base pairs of double stranded DNA (red and blue). Also shown is the protein Cdc6 (green), which is also involved in the initiation of DNA replication. Related to video <a href=http://images.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3307><i>3307</i></a> that shows the structure from different angles. From a Brookhaven National Laboratory <a href=http://www.bnl.gov/bnlweb/pubaf/pr/PR_display.asp?prID=1391&template=Today target="_blank">news release</a>, "Study Reveals How Protein Machinery Binds and Wraps DNA to Start Replication." 10/19/2020 6:35:19 AM10/19/2020 6:35:19 AMThe light brown shading represents the structure obtained by cryo-EM The ribbon diagram structures came from X-ray crystallography and were superimposed on the cryo-EM structure STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{B3B34891-56E7-4C4C-AC4A-53B710F155A1}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
331445912Opioid receptors on the surfaces of brain cells are involved in pleasure, pain, addiction, depression, psychosis, and other conditions. The receptors bind to both innate opioids and drugs ranging from hospital anesthetics to opium. Researchers at The Scripps Research Institute, supported by the NIGMS Protein Structure Initiative, determined the first three-dimensional structure of a human opioid receptor, a kappa-opioid receptor. In this illustration, the submicroscopic receptor structure is shown while bound to an agonist (or activator). The structure is superimposed on a poppy flower, the source of opium. From a Scripps Research Institute <a href=http://www.scripps.edu/news/press/20120321stevens.html target="_blank">news release</a>.12/23/2020 4:46:54 PM12/23/2020 4:46:54 PMby the NIGMS Protein Structure Initiative, determined the first three-dimensional structure of a human opioid receptor, a Human opioid receptor structure superimposed on poppy STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{4BBF8D4D-E333-41E5-9B54-06A7AA38E085}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
237839676Model of a protein, antigen 85B, that is the most abundant protein exported by <i>Mycobacterium tuberculosis</i>, which causes most cases of tuberculosis. Antigen 85B is involved in building the bacterial cell wall and is an attractive drug target. Based on its structure, scientists have suggested a new class of antituberculous drugs.10/29/2020 4:41:39 PM10/29/2020 4:41:39 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Molecular Structures drug development, model, protein structure string;#<DIV><img style='max-width:100px;max-height STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{B2306E63-5526-4111-87D2-099B1DDC2FD0}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
238639692Structure of sortase b from the bacterium <i>B. anthracis</i>, which causes anthrax. Sortase b is an enzyme used to rob red blood cells of iron, which the bacteria need to survive.10/29/2020 4:53:35 PM10/29/2020 4:53:35 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified hi_Sortase_b_from_B_anthracis_L    Low 30 KB 6/3/2016 3:10 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{D46B5EDD-4F22-43BF-A896-E9934976DE8C}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
234639645Model of a human protein associated with the adenylyl cyclase, an enzyme involved in intracellular signaling.10/29/2020 3:00:19 PM10/29/2020 3:00:19 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2346_th_1k8f_S    Low 53 KB 3/29/2019 11:50 AM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C protein structure STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{B6534242-F2E6-4D37-8A57-C9F8F5724860}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
238539687Model based on X-ray crystallography of the structure of a small heat shock protein complex from the bacteria, <i>Methanococcus jannaschii</i>. <i>Methanococcus jannaschii</i> is an organism that lives at near boiling temperature, and this protein complex helps it cope with the stress of high temperature. Similar complexes are produced in human cells when they are "stressed" by events such as burns, heart attacks, or strokes. The complexes help cells recover from the stressful event.10/29/2020 4:52:21 PM10/29/2020 4:52:21 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified hi_shsp_M    Medium 33 KB 6/3/2016 3:10 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Molecular Structures protein structure STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{40B67A58-1E58-4090-86D8-6F853DE4D2BA}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
238839695Solution NMR structure of protein target WR41 (left) from <i>C. elegans</i>. Noting the unanticipated structural similarity to the ubiquitin protein (Ub) found in all eukaryotic cells, researchers discovered that WR41 is a Ub-like modifier, ubiquitin-fold modifier 1 (Ufm1), on a newly uncovered ubiquitin-like pathway. Subsequently, the PSI group also determined the three-dimensional structure of protein target HR41 (right) from humans, the E2 ligase for Ufm1, using both NMR and X-ray crystallography.10/29/2020 4:56:46 PM10/29/2020 4:56:46 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2388_wr_hr41_S    Low 63 KB 3/29/2019 11:29 AM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C Molecular Structures STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{9831464C-3582-4504-A4D7-DFC565D64ADE}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
660146289This animation shows atoms of the HIV capsid, the shell that encloses the virus's genetic material. Scientists determined the exact structure of the capsid using a variety of imaging techniques and analyses. They then entered this data into a supercomputer to produce this image. Learn more in the <a href="https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/pages/Factsheet_StructuralBiology.aspx"> structural biology fact sheet</a>. Related to image <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=3477">3477</a>. 1/28/2021 8:06:44 PM1/28/2021 8:06:44 PMAtomic-Level Structure of the HIV Capsid    High 20229 KB 12/10/2020 5:41 PM atomic-level structure of HIV capsid_thumbnail    Thumbnail 12 KB 12/10/2020 STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{2C77B30F-B214-4301-B475-E0433A651C12}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
235239650Model of aspartoacylase, a human enzyme involved in brain metabolism.10/29/2020 3:08:25 PM10/29/2020 3:08:25 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2352_hi_2i3c_S    Low 113 KB 3/29/2019 11:47 AM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{816D0D7B-ED59-4000-BF2A-0FCB0B539282}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
234739646Model of the mammalian iron enzyme cysteine dioxygenase from a mouse.10/29/2020 3:01:48 PM10/29/2020 3:01:48 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2347_hi_2atf_S    Low 101 KB 3/29/2019 11:49 AM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{747C57A6-D312-4075-B699-1B0268093AF9}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
235039648Model of the mandelate racemase enzyme from <i>Bacillus subtilis</i>, a bacterium commonly found in soil.10/29/2020 3:05:19 PM10/29/2020 3:05:19 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2350_th_2gge1_M    Medium 108 KB 3/12/2019 11:43 AM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{A5644D52-4C8F-4D34-8EB7-712DB5A0B321}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
238039678Model of an enzyme, PanB, from <i>Mycobacterium tuberculosis</i>, the bacterium that causes most cases of tuberculosis. This enzyme is an attractive drug target.10/29/2020 4:44:22 PM10/29/2020 4:44:22 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified hi_Rv2225_M    Medium 164 KB 6/3/2016 3:10 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{598D1C54-0A52-4388-8B15-9D8F0CAD6996}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
238739694A model of thymidylate synthase complementing protein from <i>Thermotoga maritime</i>.10/29/2020 4:55:29 PM10/29/2020 4:55:29 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2387_th_tm04491_thumbnail    Thumbnail 64 KB 3/12/2019 11:53 AM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{C813EBA4-E90A-4989-BB0C-B98FA669BD0A}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131