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2335528Glide across an icy canyon, where you see smiling snowmen and waddling penguins. Toss a snowball, hear it smash against an igloo, and then watch it explode in bright colors. Psychologists David Patterson and Hunter Hoffman of the University of Washington in Seattle developed this virtual "Snow World" to test whether immersing someone in a pretend reality could ease pain during burn treatment and other medical procedures. They found that people fully engaged in the virtual reality experience reported 60 percent less pain. The technology offers a promising new way to manage pain. Featured in the December 20, 2005, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/05-12-20/#1 target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.10/29/2020 2:31:54 PM10/29/2020 2:31:54 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified SnowWorld    High 51 KB 6/3/2016 3:09 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Injury and Illness STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{3BFE0376-FCF8-4DDE-A448-0C4F83A3E31D}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
25741047This <A href="http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/news/releases/videos/ferguson_video_1.ram">video</A> (requires free <A href="http://www.real.com/freeplayer/?rppr=fed" target="_blank">RealPlayer</A>) shows an uncontrolled outbreak of transmissible avian flu among people living in Thailand. Red indicates new cases while green indicates areas where the epidemic has finished. The video shows the spread of infection and recovery over 300 days in Thailand and neighboring countries.10/30/2020 4:13:08 PM10/30/2020 4:13:08 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2574_Simulation_of_uncontrolled_avian_flu_outbreak_T    Thumbnail 61 KB 3/29/2019 11:11 AM Injury and Illness STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{754FD1A3-B488-4058-B114-A67AD7277B4C}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6536973Sepsis is the body’s overactive and extreme response to an infection. More than 1.7 million people get sepsis each year in the United States. Without prompt treatment, sepsis can lead to tissue damage, organ failure, and death. Many NIGMS-supported researchers are working to improve sepsis diagnosis and treatment. Learn more with our <a href="https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/Pages/factsheet_sepsis.aspx"> sepsis fact sheet</a>. <br><br> See <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6551">6551</a> for the Spanish version of this infographic. 3/24/2020 6:52:34 PM3/24/2020 6:52:34 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Sepsis-508_m    Medium 339 KB 9/23/2020 4:12 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C Injury and Illness STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{C1831FC8-0317-491C-987F-6CC9D97A7609}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
36121050Multiple anthrax bacteria (green) being enveloped by an immune system cell (purple). Anthrax bacteria live in soil and form dormant spores that can survive for decades. When animals eat or inhale these spores, the bacteria activate and rapidly increase in number. Today, a highly effective and widely used vaccine has made the disease uncommon in domesticated animals and rare in humans. This image is part of the Life: Magnified collection, which was displayed in the Gateway Gallery at Washington Dulles International Airport June 3, 2014, to January 21, 2015. To see all 46 images in this exhibit, go to https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/life-magnified/Pages/default.aspx.10/26/2020 1:12:48 AM10/26/2020 1:12:48 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 9_1_Anthrax_and_immune_cell    Other 63559 KB 10/25/2020 9:16 PM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{8B93F520-2902-4EB6-AB80-67DF9FAFE76B}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
36041199Along with blood vessels (red) and nerve cells (green), this mouse brain shows abnormal protein clumps known as plaques (blue). These plaques multiply in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease and are associated with the memory impairment characteristic of the disease. Because mice have genomes nearly identical to our own, they are used to study both the genetic and environmental factors that trigger Alzheimer's disease. Experimental treatments are also tested in mice to identify the best potential therapies for human patients. This image is part of the Life: Magnified collection, which was displayed in the Gateway Gallery at Washington Dulles International Airport June 3, 2014, to January 21, 2015. To see all 46 images in this exhibit, go to https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/life-magnified/Pages/default.aspx.10/25/2020 11:19:55 PM10/25/2020 11:19:55 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 10_alzheimerbrain_s_T    Thumbnail 5 KB 6/3/2016 3:33 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C illness, structure STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{5E098B48-2D3B-477A-82C0-1A20292EAF17}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
34991110Wound healing requires the action of stem cells. In mice that lack the Sept2/ARTS gene, stem cells involved in wound healing live longer and wounds heal faster and more thoroughly than in normal mice. This confocal microscopy image from a mouse lacking the Sept2/ARTS gene shows a tail wound in the process of healing. Cell nuclei are in blue. Red and orange mark hair follicle stem cells (hair follicle stem cells activate to cause hair regrowth, which indicates healing). See more information in the press release from Rockefeller University (http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2013/06/20/scientists-identify-gene-that-regulates-stem-cell-death-and-skin-regeneration/) and the article in Science (http://www.sciencemag.org/content/341/6143/286.abstract).9/9/2020 3:32:17 AM9/9/2020 3:32:17 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Steller3    Other 2867 KB 9/26/2020 10:42 PM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C This confocal microscopy image from a mouse lacking the Sept2/ARTS STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{0E9BF67F-CA2D-44C1-B651-1E6225E274E3}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
35001111Wound healing requires the action of stem cells. In mice that lack the Sept2/ARTS gene, stem cells involved in wound healing live longer and wounds heal faster and more thoroughly than in normal mice. This confocal microscopy image from a mouse lacking the Sept2/ARTS gene shows a tail wound in the process of healing. See more information in the press release from Rockefeller University <a href="http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2013/06/20/scientists-identify-gene-that-regulates-stem-cell-death-and-skin-regeneration/">(http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2013/06/20/scientists-identify-gene-that-regulates-stem-cell-death-and-skin-regeneration/)</a> and the article in Science <a href="http://www.sciencemag.org/content/341/6143/286.abstract/"> (http://www.sciencemag.org/content/341/6143/286.abstract)</a>.<br<</br>Related to images 3497 and 3498.9/10/2020 3:29:16 PM9/10/2020 3:29:16 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Steller4    Other 884 KB 9/26/2020 10:43 PM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C In mice that lack the Sept2/ARTS STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{796B0EB8-8631-4FAD-9881-4789DF4C19D1}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
34971108Wound healing requires the action of stem cells. In mice that lack the Sept2/ARTS gene, stem cells involved in wound healing live longer and wounds heal faster and more thoroughly than in normal mice. This confocal microscopy image from a mouse lacking the Sept2/ARTS gene shows a tail wound in the process of healing. See more information in the press release from Rockefeller University (http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2013/06/20/scientists-identify-gene-that-regulates-stem-cell-death-and-skin-regeneration/) and the article in Science (http://www.sciencemag.org/content/341/6143/286.abstract).<br<</br>Related to images 3498 and 3500.9/9/2020 2:55:38 AM9/9/2020 2:55:38 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Steller1    High 505 KB 6/3/2016 3:30 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C br<</br>Related to images 3498 and 3500 STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{C569D568-2C7B-41A2-A222-B70E85E15374}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
34981109Wound healing requires the action of stem cells. In mice that lack the Sept2/ARTS gene, stem cells involved in wound healing live longer and wounds heal faster and more thoroughly than in normal mice. This confocal microscopy image from a mouse lacking the Sept2/ARTS gene shows a tail wound in the process of healing. See more information in the press release from Rockefeller University (http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2013/06/20/scientists-identify-gene-that-regulates-stem-cell-death-and-skin-regeneration/) and the article in Science (http://www.sciencemag.org/content/341/6143/286.abstract).<br<</br>Related to images 3497 and 3500.9/9/2020 3:30:22 AM9/9/2020 3:30:22 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Steller22    High 220 KB 6/3/2016 3:30 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C br<</br>Related to images 3497 and 3500 STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{6130A2D6-BDAC-4210-BFD6-D3D1767A3A40}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3550943The green spots in this image are clumps of protein inside yeast cells that are deficient in both zinc and a protein called Tsa1 that prevents clumping. Protein clumping plays a role in many diseases, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's, where proteins clump together in the brain. Zinc deficiency within a cell can cause proteins to mis-fold and eventually clump together. Normally, in yeast, Tsa1 codes for so-called "chaperone proteins" which help proteins in stressed cells, such as those with a zinc deficiency, fold correctly. The <a href="http://www.jbc.org/content/early/2013/09/10/jbc.M113.512384.abstract">research behind this image </a> was published in 2013 in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.1/15/2021 5:09:01 PM1/15/2021 5:09:01 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Eide-zinc    Other 9572 KB 9/27/2020 1:09 AM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C The green spots in this image are STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{4E032525-5B45-4148-8875-AA3FF8461ABB}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2716488<i>Mycobacterium tuberculosis</i>, the bacterium that causes tuberculosis, has infected one third of the world's population and is responsible for nearly two million deaths each year. Featured in the November 18, 2009 issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/09-11-18/index.html#5 target="_blank"><i>Biomedical Beat</i></a>.8/6/2020 5:50:58 PM8/6/2020 5:50:58 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified bacterium_causes_TB3_S    Low 234 KB 9/14/2016 11:21 AM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C Injury and Illness STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{662936C1-374F-4E78-AEE5-211BD0640A20}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
34601015Recombinant proteins such as the prion protein shown here are often used to model how proteins misfold and sometimes polymerize in neurodegenerative disorders. This prion protein was expressed in E. coli, purified and fibrillized at pH 7. Image taken in 2004 for a research project by Roger Moore, Ph.D., at Rocky Mountain Laboratories that was published in 2007 in <i>Biochemistry</i>. This image was not used in the publication.8/31/2020 4:08:32 AM8/31/2020 4:08:32 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified fibril_L    Low 57 KB 6/3/2016 3:29 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Recombinant proteins such as the prion STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{D61A0D04-06B0-47B0-B82D-4FEDA379609F}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
25731046This <A href="http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/news/releases/videos/ferguson_video_1.ram">video</A> (requires free <A href="http://www.real.com/freeplayer/?rppr=fed" target="_blank">RealPlayer</A>) shows a controlled outbreak of transmissible avian flu among people living in Thailand. Red indicates areas of infection while blue indicates areas where a combination of control measures were implemented. The video shows how control measures contained the infection in 90 days, before it spread elsewhere.10/30/2020 4:11:25 PM10/30/2020 4:11:25 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2573_Simulation_of_controlled_avian_flu_outbreak_T    Thumbnail 93 KB 3/29/2019 11:12 AM Injury and Illness STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{E75868D3-C082-4854-B468-98DB7F4BF8AF}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
677139842Mosquito larvae with genes edited by CRISPR swimming in water. This species of mosquito, <em>Culex quinquefasciatus</em>, can transmit West Nile virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, and avian malaria, among other diseases. The researchers who took this video developed a gene-editing toolkit for <em>Culex quinquefasciatus</em> that could ultimately help stop the mosquitoes from spreading pathogens. The work is described in the <em>Nature Communications</em> paper "<a href=https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-021-23239-0>Optimized CRISPR tools and site-directed transgenesis towards gene drive development in <em>Culex quinquefasciatus</em> mosquitoes</a>" by Feng et al. Related to images <a href=https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6769>6769</a> and <a href=https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6770>6770</a>. 7/6/2021 6:59:21 PM7/6/2021 6:59:21 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified MosquitoLarvae_VideoStill    Thumbnail 1025 KB 6/28/2021 8:49 AM Dolan, Lauren (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{09B18D1C-0C3C-4F6B-9DDD-7BA19EE5AE1A}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2311619This web-like structure shows the abnormal accumulation of cholesterol in a mouse brain cell that contains an aberrant protein linked to Huntington's disease, a fatal condition marked by a progressive degeneration of brain nerve cells. While the gene underlying the disease has been identified, little is known about how it leads to such neuronal damage. But the discovery that cholesterol builds up in mouse brain cells expressing the Huntington's protein could offer new clues for understanding the mechanism of the disease in humans. Featured in the December 19, 2006, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/06-12-19/#1 target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.10/29/2020 1:00:19 PM10/29/2020 1:00:19 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2311_cholesterol_in_mouse_brain_cell_S    Low 72 KB 3/29/2019 1:53 PM Constantinides Injury and Illness STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{40C466BA-6519-4523-8F67-829B38B64156}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6551794La sepsis o septicemia es la respuesta fulminante y extrema del cuerpo a una infección. En los Estados Unidos, más de 1.7 millones de personas contraen sepsis cada año. Sin un tratamiento rápido, la sepsis puede provocar daño de los tejidos, insuficiencia orgánica y muerte. El NIGMS apoya a muchos investigadores en su trabajo para mejorar el diagnóstico y el tratamiento de la sepsis. Obtenga más información con nuestra hoja informativa sobre la sepsis. Aprenda más con nuestra hoja <a href="https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/fact-sheets/Pages/sepsis-spanish.aspx">informativa sobre la sepsis</a>.<br> <br> Vea <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6536">6536</a> para la versión en inglés de esta infografía. 3/24/2020 6:35:36 PM3/24/2020 6:35:36 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Sepsis_030920_Esp_thumb    Thumbnail 207 KB 3/20/2020 6:41 PM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS Injury and Illness STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{402B4C80-3489-4EAA-B13F-17D1DA962FFB}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
35761148Here, bubonic plague bacteria (yellow) are shown in the digestive system of a rat flea (purple). The bubonic plague killed a third of Europeans in the mid-14th century. Today, it is still active in Africa, Asia and the Americas, with as many as 2,000 people infected worldwide each year. If caught early, bubonic plague can be treated with antibiotics. This image is part of the Life: Magnified collection, which was displayed in the Gateway Gallery at Washington Dulles International Airport June 3, 2014, to January 21, 2015. To see all 46 images in this exhibit, go to https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/life-magnified/Pages/default.aspx.1/6/2021 7:10:12 PM1/6/2021 7:10:12 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Yersina_pestis_1_H    High 4674 KB 10/5/2020 2:04 AM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{1DA06FC3-2FA7-4A59-B108-BBB3DD8ACB3F}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
676939828A mosquito larva with genes edited by CRISPR. The red-orange glow is a fluorescent protein used to track the edits. This species of mosquito, <em>Culex quinquefasciatus</em>, can transmit West Nile virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, and avian malaria, among other diseases. The researchers who took this image developed a gene-editing toolkit for <em>Culex quinquefasciatus</em> that could ultimately help stop the mosquitoes from spreading pathogens. The work is described in the <em>Nature Communications</em> paper "<a href=https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-021-23239-0>Optimized CRISPR tools and site-directed transgenesis towards gene drive development in <em>Culex quinquefasciatus</em> mosquitoes</a>" by Feng et al. Related to image <a href=https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6770>6770</a> and video <a href=https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6771>6771</a>. 7/6/2021 7:00:39 PM7/6/2021 7:00:39 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified MosquitoLarva_S    Low 5 KB 6/27/2021 9:26 PM Dolan, Lauren (NIH/NIGMS) [C The work is described in the <em STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{A8C5E363-3325-42F7-9166-04FB7C951AB9}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
677039830Mosquito larvae with genes edited by CRISPR. This species of mosquito, <em>Culex quinquefasciatus</em>, can transmit West Nile virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, and avian malaria, among other diseases. The researchers who took this image developed a gene-editing toolkit for <em>Culex quinquefasciatus</em> that could ultimately help stop the mosquitoes from spreading pathogens. The work is described in the <em>Nature Communications</em> paper "<a href=https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-021-23239-0>Optimized CRISPR tools and site-directed transgenesis towards gene drive development in <em>Culex quinquefasciatus</em> mosquitoes</a>" by Feng et al. Related to image <a href=https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6769>6769</a> and video <a href=https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6771>6771</a>. 7/6/2021 7:00:15 PM7/6/2021 7:00:15 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Group-MosquitoLarvae_3_1200x675px_M    Medium 32 KB 6/27/2021 9:33 PM Dolan, Lauren (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{02BA6AA9-5422-416B-B1F0-46FB22FFA62B}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3549942The green in this image highlights a protein called TonB, which is produced by many gram-negative bacteria, including those that cause typhoid fever, meningitis and dysentery. TonB lets bacteria take up iron from the host's body, which they need to survive. More information about the research behind this image can be found in a <a href="http://biobeat.nigms.nih.gov/2013/08/cool-image-tiny-bacterial-motor/">Biomedical Beat Blog posting</a> from August 2013.9/27/2020 5:01:16 AM9/27/2020 5:01:16 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified tonb_klebba_L    Low 3 KB 6/3/2016 3:31 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Beat Blog posting</a> from August 2013 STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{64FA3C50-EBC9-4930-B1C5-3401B94D1191}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3271718These neurons are derived from mouse embryonic stem cells. Red shows cells making a protein called TH that is characteristic of the neurons that degenerate in Parkinson's disease. Green indicates a protein that's found in all neurons. Blue indicates the nuclei of all cells. Studying dopaminergic neurons can help researchers understand the origins of Parkinson's disease and could be used to screen potential new drugs. Image and caption information courtesy of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine.12/22/2020 6:22:25 PM12/22/2020 6:22:25 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified DopaminergicneuronsfromEScells02_L    Low 15 KB 6/3/2016 3:25 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{AA891D0F-8094-4F2E-B80C-B6C7E1B2F7CD}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2792425Ecteinascidin 743 (ET-743, brand name Yondelis), was discovered and isolated from a sea squirt, <i>Ecteinascidia turbinata</i>, by NIGMS grantee Kenneth Rinehart at the University of Illinois. It was synthesized by NIGMS grantees E.J. Corey and later by Samuel Danishefsky. It is being tested for the treatment of several types of cancer. Multiple versions of this structure are available as entries 2790-2797.2/22/2021 9:16:23 PM2/22/2021 9:16:23 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified ET743_withhydrogens3_L    Low 7 KB 6/3/2016 3:17 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{4963F63F-003F-4953-90E4-2A7F8F991A40}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2793426Ecteinascidin 743 (ET-743, brand name Yondelis), was discovered and isolated from a sea squirt, <i>Ecteinascidia turbinata</i>, by NIGMS grantee Kenneth Rinehart at the University of Illinois. It was synthesized by NIGMS grantees E.J. Corey and later by Samuel Danishefsky. It is being tested for the treatment of several types of cancer. Multiple versions of this structure are available as entries 2790-2797.2/22/2021 9:15:49 PM2/22/2021 9:15:49 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified ET743_withhydrogens4_L    Low 6 KB 6/3/2016 3:17 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{67AA09A5-FC44-4339-8633-DF8EB90ED651}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2790607Ecteinascidin 743 (ET-743, brand name Yondelis), was discovered and isolated from a sea squirt, <i>Ecteinascidia turbinata</i>, by NIGMS grantee Kenneth Rinehart at the University of Illinois. It was synthesized by NIGMS grantees E.J. Corey and later by Samuel Danishefsky. It is being tested for the treatment of several types of cancer. Multiple versions of this structure are available as entries 2790-2797.2/22/2021 9:17:13 PM2/22/2021 9:17:13 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified ET743_withhydrogens1_L    Low 7 KB 6/3/2016 3:17 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{EC7C5CD8-DB75-4FDD-BD22-2ADC6B5D21AE}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2791608Ecteinascidin 743 (ET-743, brand name Yondelis), was discovered and isolated from a sea squirt, <i>Ecteinascidia turbinata</i>, by NIGMS grantee Kenneth Rinehart at the University of Illinois. It was synthesized by NIGMS grantees E.J. Corey and later by Samuel Danishefsky. It is being tested for the treatment of several types of cancer. Multiple versions of this structure are available as entries 2790-2797.2/22/2021 9:16:48 PM2/22/2021 9:16:48 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified ET743_withhydrogens2_L    Low 6 KB 6/3/2016 3:17 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{7E9FE313-7ECC-410F-8624-D1F7D0E636A4}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2794427Ecteinascidin 743 (ET-743, brand name Yondelis), was discovered and isolated from a sea squirt, <i>Ecteinascidia turbinata</i>, by NIGMS grantee Kenneth Rinehart at the University of Illinois. It was synthesized by NIGMS grantees E.J. Corey and later by Samuel Danishefsky. It is being tested for the treatment of several types of cancer. Multiple versions of this structure are available as entries 2790-2797.2/22/2021 9:15:20 PM2/22/2021 9:15:20 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified ET_743_1    High 32 KB 6/3/2016 3:17 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C It was synthesized by NIGMS grantees E.J. STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{3571E897-569B-41FE-A346-675BCE8E754E}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2795428Ecteinascidin 743 (ET-743, brand name Yondelis), was discovered and isolated from a sea squirt, <i>Ecteinascidia turbinata</i>, by NIGMS grantee Kenneth Rinehart at the University of Illinois. It was synthesized by NIGMS grantees E.J. Corey and later by Samuel Danishefsky. It is being tested for the treatment of several types of cancer. Multiple versions of this structure are available as entries 2790-2797.2/22/2021 9:13:50 PM2/22/2021 9:13:50 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified ET_743_2_L    Low 5 KB 6/3/2016 3:17 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C It was synthesized by NIGMS grantees E.J. STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{86C9B538-29A6-4393-97EA-0AFC5C537F94}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2796429Ecteinascidin 743 (ET-743, brand name Yondelis), was discovered and isolated from a sea squirt, <i>Ecteinascidia turbinata</i>, by NIGMS grantee Kenneth Rinehart at the University of Illinois. It was synthesized by NIGMS grantees E.J. Corey and later by Samuel Danishefsky. It is being tested for the treatment of several types of cancer. Multiple versions of this structure are available as entries 2790-2797.2/22/2021 9:13:21 PM2/22/2021 9:13:21 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified ET_743_3_M    Medium 14 KB 6/3/2016 3:18 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C It was synthesized by NIGMS grantees STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{E6169F09-5DE1-4290-8EC8-33659920398D}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2797430Ecteinascidin 743 (ET-743, brand name Yondelis), was discovered and isolated from a sea squirt, <i>Ecteinascidia turbinata</i>, by NIGMS grantee Kenneth Rinehart at the University of Illinois. It was synthesized by NIGMS grantees E.J. Corey and later by Samuel Danishefsky. It is being tested for the treatment of several types of cancer. Multiple versions of this structure are available as entries 2790-2797.2/22/2021 8:37:35 PM2/22/2021 8:37:35 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified ET_743_4_L    Low 5 KB 6/3/2016 3:18 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C It was synthesized by NIGMS grantees E.J. STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{5615C701-C08A-437D-B6E4-76C640712744}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3586958Relapsing fever is caused by a bacterium and transmitted by certain soft-bodied ticks or body lice. The disease is seldom fatal in humans, but it can be very serious and prolonged. This scanning electron micrograph shows Borrelia hermsii (green), one of the bacterial species that causes the disease, interacting with red blood cells. Micrograph by Robert Fischer, NIAID. Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3585">image 3585</a>. <Br></Br>For more information about relapsing fever, see <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/relapsing-fever/index.html">https://www.cdc.gov/relapsing-fever/index.html</a>. <Br></Br> This image is part of the Life: Magnified collection, which was displayed in the Gateway Gallery at Washington Dulles International Airport June 3, 2014, to January 21, 2015. To see all 46 images in this exhibit, go to <a href="https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/life-magnified/Pages/default.aspx">https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/life-magnified/Pages/default.aspx</a>10/19/2020 5:43:06 AM10/19/2020 5:43:06 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Relapsing_fever_rbc-hermsii-sem_M    Medium 894 KB 6/3/2016 3:33 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{C5947FC0-AF26-4C5E-8046-E19E179937DF}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
36131051Cells missing a key molecule look spiky and cannot move normally. This is a fibroblast, a connective tissue cell that plays an important role in wound healing. Normal fibroblasts have smooth edges. In contrast, this spiky cell is missing a protein that is necessary for proper construction of the cell's skeleton. Its jagged shape makes it impossible for the cell to move normally. In addition to compromising wound healing, abnormal cell movement can lead to birth defects, faulty immune function and other health problems. This image is part of the Life: Magnified collection, which was displayed in the Gateway Gallery at Washington Dulles International Airport June 3, 2014, to January 21, 2015. To see all 46 images in this exhibit, go to https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/life-magnified/Pages/default.aspx. The image is also featured in October 2015 Biomedical Beat blog post <a href="http://biobeat.nigms.nih.gov/2015/10/cool-images-a-halloween-inspired-cell-collection/" target="_">Cool Images: A Halloween-Inspired Cell Collection</a>.10/26/2020 1:19:45 AM10/26/2020 1:19:45 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 5_bottomright_Cells_spikey    Other 1345 KB 10/25/2020 9:22 PM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{2A04F5B4-6212-41EE-8D4C-C4250AB717CE}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3386676The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV),shown here as tiny purple spheres, causes the disease known as AIDS (for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome). HIV can infect multiple cells in your body, including brain cells, but its main target is a cell in the immune system called the CD4 lymphocyte (also called a T-cell or CD4 cell).12/23/2020 8:03:30 PM12/23/2020 8:03:30 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified NCMIR_HIV_infected_cell_L    Low 24 KB 6/3/2016 3:27 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{3D7073C8-3290-4F3B-9B48-714CBFC2BE59}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
35731146Scientists revealed a detailed image of the genetic defect that causes myotonic dystrophy type 2 and used that information to design drug candidates to counteract the disease. More information about the research behind this image can be found in a <a href="http://biobeat.nigms.nih.gov/2014/01/targeting-toxic-rna-molecules-in-muscular-dystrophy/" target=_blank>Biomedical Beat</a> Blog posting from January 2014.10/5/2020 5:50:20 AM10/5/2020 5:50:20 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 3573_Disney_acsimage_thumbnail    Thumbnail 57 KB 3/12/2019 12:25 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{23107167-597E-46A9-BAF0-3B572CEF8896}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3483833For thousands of years, Chinese herbalists have treated malaria using Chang Shan, a root extract from a type of hydrangea that grows in Tibet and Nepal. Recent studies have suggested Chang Shan can also reduce scar formation, treat multiple sclerosis and even slow cancer progression.8/31/2020 5:19:41 AM8/31/2020 5:19:41 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Chang-san_L    Low 34 KB 6/3/2016 3:30 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C We would like to know if we can use the STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{AFB3ACDC-59D9-45A3-B6A1-5E485B2620CF}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
35711145A tomographic reconstruction of the colon shows the location of large pools of HIV-1 virus particles (in blue) located in the spaces between adjacent cells. The purple objects within each sphere represent the conical cores that are one of the structural hallmarks of the HIV virus. More information about the research behind this image can be found in a <a href="http://www.plospathogens.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.ppat.1003899" target=_blank>PLOS Pathogens</a> article from January 30, 2014.10/5/2020 5:45:24 AM10/5/2020 5:45:24 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified HIV_in_colon_L    Low 254 KB 6/3/2016 3:32 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C I hope this is the one you wanted STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{468C9090-81F9-46C4-AC94-3E8D40C64A9C}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
1157462Image of <i>Streptococcus</i>, a type (genus) of spherical bacteria that can colonize the throat and back of the mouth. Stroptococci often occur in pairs or in chains, as shown here.8/27/2020 9:15:54 PM8/27/2020 9:15:54 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 1157_strept1color__S    Low 154 KB 3/29/2019 2:02 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{229D3635-54DB-44A1-B714-B5BF987E6975}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3486836Two healthy cells (bottom, left) enter into apoptosis (bottom, center) but spring back to life after a fatal toxin is removed (bottom, right; top).9/8/2020 10:48:30 PM9/8/2020 10:48:30 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 3486_ApoptosisRev_S    Low 69 KB 3/28/2019 4:28 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{64ABA51E-60CB-4F0E-9323-84CF44A836DE}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
11601081<i>Vibrio</i>, a type (genus) of rod-shaped bacteria. Some <i>Vibrio</i> species cause cholera in humans.10/28/2020 2:36:30 PM10/28/2020 2:36:30 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified bacta4acolor_M    Medium 366 KB 10/28/2020 11:49 AM McCulley, Jennifer (NIH/NIDCD) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{279F70C3-8828-43C0-97A6-E68C9337CF22}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
11661082<i>Leptospira</i>, shown here in green, is a type (genus) of elongated, spiral-shaped bacteria. Infection can cause Weil's disease, a kind of jaundice, in humans.10/28/2020 2:35:32 PM10/28/2020 2:35:32 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified leptoc2color_M    Medium 194 KB 10/28/2020 11:46 AM McCulley, Jennifer (NIH/NIDCD) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{7145A65C-BB14-4F68-9904-ABCBB1287DE5}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
12411085<i>Borrelia burgdorferi</i> is a spirochete, a class of long, slender bacteria that typically take on a coiled shape. Infection with this bacterium causes Lyme disease.10/28/2020 3:57:21 PM10/28/2020 3:57:21 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified lyme4-neg_M    Medium 150 KB 10/28/2020 11:56 AM McCulley, Jennifer (NIH/NIDCD) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{2477B116-D2B2-4218-8D24-A227A85CC969}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131