Search Results

 

 

25441011During DNA replication, each strand of the original molecule acts as a template for the synthesis of a new, complementary DNA strand. Featured in <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/thenewgenetics/ target="_blank"><i>The New Genetics</i></a>.3/4/2022 7:48:03 PM3/4/2022 7:48:03 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified DNA_Replication_with_labels_S    Low 91 KB 7/28/2016 4:14 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx30100https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{78EF997D-F0BC-4181-8051-F46D8EE2F0BF}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
66131284Circadian rhythms are physical, mental, and behavioral changes that follow a 24-hour cycle. Circadian rhythms are influenced by light and regulated by the brain’s suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), sometimes referred to as a master clock. Learn more in NIGMS’ circadian rhythms <a href="https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/fact-sheets/Pages/circadian-rhythms.aspx">fact sheet</a>. See <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6614">6614 </a> for the Spanish version of this infographic. 2/16/2021 3:13:58 PM2/16/2021 3:13:58 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified CR_BrainSIZED_M    Medium 28 KB 2/12/2021 9:40 AM Walter, Taylor (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx5360https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{74B01AF7-ADC8-44ED-B590-7ACFD68AA4B0}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2781720This is a magnified view of an <i>Arabidopsis thaliana</i> leaf a few days after being exposed to the pathogen <i>Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis</i>. The plant from which this leaf was taken is genetically resistant to the pathogen. The spots in blue show areas of localized cell death where infection occurred, but it did not spread. Compare this response to that shown in Image 2782. Jeff Dangl has been funded by NIGMS to study the interactions between pathogens and hosts that allow or suppress infection.8/28/2020 7:04:24 PM8/28/2020 7:04:24 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Disease_resistant_leaf_L    Low 16 KB 6/3/2016 3:17 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx6270https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{200A2BD2-9BDD-4BA7-AFA9-9CB33B552449}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2318587Pretty in pink, the enzyme histone deacetylase (HDA6) stands out against a background of blue-tinted DNA in the nucleus of an <i>Arabidopsis</i> plant cell. Here, HDA6 concentrates in the nucleolus (top center), where ribosomal RNA genes reside. The enzyme silences the ribosomal RNA genes from one parent while those from the other parent remain active. This chromosome-specific silencing of ribosomal RNA genes is an unusual phenomenon observed in hybrid plants. Featured in the June 20, 2006, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/06-06-20/#1 target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.10/29/2020 1:20:57 PM10/29/2020 1:20:57 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2318_gene_S    Low 59 KB 3/29/2019 1:50 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx41150https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{9AF8AC6D-4C9B-4230-A633-C6B5C804DB6C}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3604965Along with blood vessels (red) and nerve cells (green), this mouse brain shows abnormal protein clumps known as plaques (blue). These plaques multiply in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease and are associated with the memory impairment characteristic of the disease. Because mice have genomes nearly identical to our own, they are used to study both the genetic and environmental factors that trigger Alzheimer's disease. Experimental treatments are also tested in mice to identify the best potential therapies for human patients. This image is part of the Life: Magnified collection, which was displayed in the Gateway Gallery at Washington Dulles International Airport June 3, 2014, to January 21, 2015. To see all 46 images in this exhibit, go to https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/life-magnified/Pages/default.aspx.11/22/2022 7:23:52 PM11/22/2022 7:23:52 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 10_alzheimerbrain_s_T    Thumbnail 5 KB 6/3/2016 3:33 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx5270https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{5E098B48-2D3B-477A-82C0-1A20292EAF17}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2755507<i>Xenopus laevis</i>, the African clawed frog, has long been used as a model organism for studying embryonic development. The abnormal presence of RNA encoding the signaling molecule plakoglobin causes atypical signaling, giving rise to a two-headed tadpole.7/14/2021 6:20:28 PM7/14/2021 6:20:28 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Klym2_S    Low 90 KB 9/7/2016 6:12 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C AZM obtained this image from Dr STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx4970https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{7A0154DE-CDD8-4B46-B04F-627CC4245B9C}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2514816HIV is a retrovirus, a type of virus that carries its genetic material not as DNA but as RNA. Long before anyone had heard of HIV, researchers in labs all over the world studied retroviruses, tracing out their life cycle and identifying the key proteins the viruses use to infect cells. When HIV was identified as a retrovirus, these studies gave AIDS researchers an immediate jump-start. The previously identified viral proteins became initial drug targets. See images <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=2513">2513</a> and <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=2515">2515</a> for other versions of this illustration. Featured in <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/structlife/ target="_blank"><i>The Structures of Life</i></a>.9/25/2020 4:29:40 PM9/25/2020 4:29:40 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2514_Life_of_an_AIDS_Virus_with_labels_T    Thumbnail 117 KB 4/19/2019 12:29 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx4170https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{7C26D3D2-FF70-420C-A0BC-1E2725806E59}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
36561171A fruit fly ovary, shown here, contains as many as 20 eggs. Fruit flies are not merely tiny insects that buzz around overripe fruit--they are a venerable scientific tool. Research on the flies has shed light on many aspects of human biology, including biological rhythms, learning, memory and neurodegenerative diseases. Another reason fruit flies are so useful in a lab (and so successful in fruit bowls) is that they reproduce rapidly. About three generations can be studied in a single month. Related to image <a href="http://images.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3607" target="_blank">3607</a>.11/30/2020 9:10:22 PM11/30/2020 9:10:22 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified pink_fruit_fly_ovary_Montell_L    Low 39 KB 6/3/2016 3:37 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C So use them as much as STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx43130https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{6325F483-590F-4766-AAE7-6279A5EB29B9}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
34921146This tropical scene, reminiscent of a postcard from Key West, is actually a petri dish containing an artistic arrangement of genetically engineered bacteria. The image showcases eight of the fluorescent proteins created in the laboratory of the late Roger Y. Tsien, a cell biologist at the University of California, San Diego. Tsien, along with Osamu Shimomura of the Marine Biology Laboratory and Martin Chalfie of Columbia University, share the 2008 Nobel Prize in chemistry for their work on green fluorescent protein-a naturally glowing molecule from jellyfish that has become a powerful tool for studying molecules inside living cells.9/9/2020 1:51:26 AM9/9/2020 1:51:26 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified cool_image_colored_proteins1_M    Medium 103 KB 8/30/2016 12:30 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx46120https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{82113CDA-7154-491B-8100-C43A4925AAC1}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
58151198Genome editing using CRISPR/Cas9 is a rapidly expanding field of scientific research with emerging applications in disease treatment, medical therapeutics and bioenergy, just to name a few. This technology is now being used in laboratories all over the world to enhance our understanding of how living biological systems work, how to improve treatments for genetic diseases and how to develop energy solutions for a better future.12/18/2020 8:24:01 PM12/18/2020 8:24:01 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified doudna video    Thumbnail 832 KB 12/20/2016 1:20 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C And if the answer is yes STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx39170https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{9583BEF7-4257-4FF7-AC04-5362F743D198}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2484490NIGMS-funded researchers led by Roger Kornberg solved the structure of RNA polymerase II. This is the enzyme in mammalian cells that catalyzes the transcription of DNA into messenger RNA, the molecule that in turn dictates the order of amino acids in proteins. For his work on the mechanisms of mammalian transcription, Kornberg received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2006.9/18/2020 5:05:13 PM9/18/2020 5:05:13 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified RNA_pol_II_medium    Medium 1184 KB 6/3/2016 3:12 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx4570https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{2A10BFFD-1037-418C-890C-8D7FB32E4ED7}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2426677The structure of a gene-regulating zinc finger protein bound to DNA.8/17/2020 9:31:43 PM8/17/2020 9:31:43 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified DesignedZF    High 595 KB 6/3/2016 3:10 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx4190https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{05B06D12-30DC-46F0-97A0-41AAFF3B328B}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
25461013Meiosis is the process whereby a cell reduces its chromosomes from diploid to haploid in creating eggs or sperm. Featured in <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/thenewgenetics/ target="_blank"><i>The New Genetics</i></a>.3/4/2022 7:45:44 PM3/4/2022 7:45:44 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Meiosis_with_labels_M    Medium 237 KB 6/3/2016 3:13 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx76150https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{B2BF9925-C8E0-4844-A56B-BF8C2147EAAF}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
37201027This wreath represents the molecular structure of a protein, Cas4, which is part of a system, known as CRISPR, that bacteria use to protect themselves against viral invaders. The green ribbons show the protein's structure, and the red balls show the location of iron and sulfur molecules important for the protein's function. Scientists harnessed Cas9, a different protein in the bacterial CRISPR system, to create a gene-editing tool known as CRISPR-Cas9. Using this tool, researchers are able to study a range of cellular processes and human diseases more easily, cheaply and precisely. In December, 2015, Science magazine recognized the CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing tool as the "breakthrough of the year." Read more about Cas4 in the December 2015 Biomedical Beat post <a href="https://biobeat.nigms.nih.gov/2015/12/cool-images-a-holiday-themed-collection/">A Holiday-Themed Image Collection</a>.12/3/2020 8:52:01 PM12/3/2020 8:52:01 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Cas4_PDB_4ic11_M    Medium 377 KB 6/3/2016 3:39 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Read more about Cas4 in the STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx55180https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{2943035F-E71B-47B6-B359-C2925A36BC57}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
25471014DNA encodes RNA, which encodes protein. DNA is transcribed to make messenger RNA (mRNA). The mRNA sequence (dark red strand) is complementary to the DNA sequence (blue strand). On ribosomes, transfer RNA (tRNA) reads three codons at a time in mRNA to bring together the amino acids that link up to make a protein. See image 2548 for a labeled version of this illustration and 2549 for a labeled and numbered version. Featured in <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/thenewgenetics/ target="_blank"><i>The New Genetics</i></a>.10/16/2020 5:07:56 PM10/16/2020 5:07:56 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Translation_M    Medium 97 KB 7/27/2016 11:48 AM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx50150https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{D4FAF36B-B226-4DED-B039-62F3F525D185}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2561892Histone proteins loop together with double-stranded DNA to form a structure that resembles beads on a string. See image 2560 for an unlabeled version of this illustration. Featured in <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/thenewgenetics/ target="_blank"><i>The New Genetics</i></a>.10/23/2020 7:26:47 PM10/23/2020 7:26:47 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Histones_with_labels_S    Low 56 KB 8/26/2016 3:10 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx48140https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{3D67E801-82D8-4C50-9345-CD6E5A25A8AF}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
1022630A light microscope image of a cell from the endosperm of an African globe lily (<i>Scadoxus katherinae</i>). This is one frame of a time-lapse sequence that shows cell division in action. The lily is considered a good organism for studying cell division because its chromosomes are much thicker and easier to see than human ones. Staining shows microtubules in red and chromosomes in blue. Here, condensed chromosomes are clearly visible and are starting to separate to form two new cells.8/14/2020 5:50:57 PM8/14/2020 5:50:57 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified lilymit9_S    Low 13 KB 9/8/2016 2:41 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C Here, condensed chromosomes are clearly visible and are starting to separate STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx48100https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{AF745663-6F5E-464D-BEF5-704A80B8E28D}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
25451012Meiosis is the process whereby a cell reduces its chromosomes from diploid to haploid in creating eggs or sperm. See image 2546 for a labeled version of this illustration. Featured in <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/thenewgenetics/ target="_blank"><i>The New Genetics</i></a>.10/16/2020 5:04:11 PM10/16/2020 5:04:11 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2545thumb    Thumbnail 35 KB 6/3/2016 3:13 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx32100https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{73F4CAF1-AABE-4FF6-A46E-D410D63F5417}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
57301190Gene transcription is a process by which information encoded in DNA is transcribed into RNA. It's essential for all life and requires the activity of proteins, called transcription factors, that detect where in a DNA strand transcription should start. In eukaryotes (i.e., those that have a nucleus and mitochondria), a protein complex comprising 14 different proteins is responsible for sniffing out transcription start sites and starting the process. This complex represents the core machinery to which an enzyme, named RNA polymerase, can bind to and read the DNA and transcribe it to RNA. Scientists have used cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to visualize the TFIID-RNA polymerase-DNA complex in unprecedented detail. This animation shows the different TFIID components as they contact DNA and recruit the RNA polymerase for gene transcription. <br><br>To learn more about the research that has shed new light on gene transcription, see this <a href="http://newscenter.lbl.gov/2016/03/23/unlocking-the-secrets-of-gene-expression/">news release from Berkeley Lab</a>. <br><br>Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID=709">image 3766</a>.2/3/2020 10:28:36 PM2/3/2020 10:28:36 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 5730_Louder-Movie-trimmed_T    Thumbnail 69 KB 3/28/2019 3:26 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx48100https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{36FD005B-EAFE-4CFD-B66A-A2A602DD3612}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
66121283Los ritmos circadianos son cambios físicos, mentales y conductuales que siguen un ciclo de 24 horas. Los ritmos circadianos típicos conducen a un nivel alto de energía durante la mitad del día (de 10 a.m. a 1 p.m.) y un bajón por la tarde. De noche, los ritmos circadianos hacen que la hormona melatonina aumente, lo que hace que la persona se sienta somnolienta. <Br><Br> Vea <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6611">6611</a> para la versión en inglés de esta infografía. 12/6/2023 4:07:23 PM12/6/2023 4:07:23 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified CR_TimelineSPANISH_Opt3 SPANISH_M    Medium 414 KB 2/12/2021 9:36 AM Walter, Taylor (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx7870https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{FFD1502D-963E-45D8-96C9-857661978201}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3255520Human metaphase chromosomes are visible with fluoresence in vitro hybridization (FISH). Centromeric alpha satellite DNA (green) are found in the heterochromatin at each centromere. Immunofluorescence with CENP-A (red) shows the centromere-specific histone H3 variant that specifies the kinetochore.12/22/2020 5:01:54 PM12/22/2020 5:01:54 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified GGS_image1__Peter_Warburton__3255_S    Low 74 KB 9/7/2016 2:01 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx6190https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{D0E6A44E-C25E-4BDC-810C-AC4C7C2A675B}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2559890RNA interference or RNAi is a gene-silencing process in which double-stranded RNAs trigger the destruction of specific RNAs. See <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=2558">image 2558</a> for an unlabeled version of this illustration. Featured in <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/thenewgenetics/ target="_blank"><i>The New Genetics</i></a>.10/23/2020 7:25:09 PM10/23/2020 7:25:09 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2559_RNA__Interference_with_labels_T    Thumbnail 59 KB 4/19/2019 12:31 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx52100https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{6E76594A-016A-454D-8CEB-1D7436AAF019}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2554696Ribonucleic acid (RNA) has a sugar-phosphate backbone and the bases adenine (A), cytosine (C), guanine (G), and uracil (U). See image 2554 for a labeled version of this illustration. Featured in <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/thenewgenetics/ target="_blank"><i>The New Genetics</i></a>.3/4/2022 7:36:33 PM3/4/2022 7:36:33 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2554_RNA_S    Low 97 KB 3/29/2019 11:20 AM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx6270https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{53E4AF8E-ED64-4744-90A7-3C71D80809DF}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
57701047Cell division is an incredibly coordinated process. It not only ensures that the new cells formed during this event have a full set of chromosomes, but also that they are endowed with all the cellular materials, including proteins, lipids and small functional compartments called organelles, that are required for normal cell activity. This proper apportioning of essential cell ingredients helps each cell get off to a running start.<Br><Br> This image shows an electron microscopy (EM) thin section taken at 10,000x magnification of a dividing yeast cell over-expressing the protein ubiquitin, which is involved in protein degradation and recycling. The picture features mother and daughter endosome accumulations (small organelles with internal vesicles), a darkly stained vacuole and a dividing nucleus in close contact with a cadre of lipid droplets (unstained spherical bodies). Other dynamic events are also visible, such as spindle microtubules in the nucleus and endocytic pits at the plasma membrane. <Br><Br>These extensive details were revealed thanks to a preservation method involving high-pressure freezing, freeze-substitution and Lowicryl HM20 embedding. 12/18/2020 6:43:14 PM12/18/2020 6:43:14 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified doa4cs_oeUb_co69a_M    Medium 119 KB 7/26/2016 12:30 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx4370https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{F7AE0A8B-16E1-4D6F-95FD-BF2175A028B9}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2579702In 2007, the FDA modified warfarin's label to indicate that genetic makeup may affect patient response to the drug. The widely used blood thinner is sold under the brand name Coumadin®. Scientists involved in the NIH Pharmacogenetics Research Network are investigating whether genetic information can be used to improve optimal dosage prediction for patients.10/30/2020 4:31:09 PM10/30/2020 4:31:09 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2579_Warfarin_S    Low 81 KB 3/29/2019 11:07 AM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx3880https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{3569AB1B-0A8E-4231-BF44-BA1EB62A78C9}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2606902The human skin cells pictured contain genetic modifications that make them pluripotent, essentially equivalent to embryonic stem cells. A scientific team from the University of Wisconsin-Madison including researchers Junying Yu, James Thomson, and their colleagues produced the transformation by introducing a set of four genes into human fibroblasts, skin cells that are easy to obtain and grow in culture.10/30/2020 7:29:57 PM10/30/2020 7:29:57 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified skin_cell_pluripotent07_1.2_M    Medium 364 KB 7/27/2016 11:42 AM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx3980https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{F5E9431B-2DE0-44AA-BAE3-869CECE1EF36}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2753849<i>Xenopus laevis</i>, the African clawed frog, has long been used as a model organism for studying embryonic development. In this image, RNA encoding the transcription factor Sox 7 (dark blue) is shown to predominate at the vegetal pole, the yolk-rich portion, of a <i>Xenopus laevis</i> frog egg. Sox 7 protein is important to the regulation of embryonic development.8/21/2020 6:05:59 PM8/21/2020 6:05:59 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Klym1_S    Low 9 KB 9/7/2016 6:11 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C AZM obtained this image from Dr. Klymkowsky in response to STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx4470https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{B5EE0511-C0B1-4806-84BD-E68B638129AB}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
35901084Developing spermatids (precursors of mature sperm cells) begin as small, round cells and mature into long-tailed, tadpole-shaped ones. In the sperm cell's head is the cell nucleus; in its tail is the power to outswim thousands of competitors to fertilize an egg. As seen in this microscopy image, fruit fly spermatids start out as bouquets of interconnected cells. A small lipid molecule called PIP2 helps spermatids tell their heads from their tails. Here, PIP2 (red) marks the nuclei and a cell skeleton-building protein called tubulin (green) marks the tails. When PIP2 levels are too low, some spermatids get mixed up and grow with their heads at the wrong end. Because sperm development is similar across species, studies in fruit flies could help researchers understand male infertility in humans.8/23/2023 2:01:13 PM8/23/2023 2:01:13 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Fabian_et_al-cover_pic_1-RGB2    Other 10234 KB 10/19/2020 1:52 AM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx4060https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{1E653F9B-A3DB-4BB0-AC1F-1A9089E37998}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
66111282Circadian rhythms are physical, mental, and behavioral changes that follow a 24-hour cycle. Typical circadian rhythms lead to high energy during the middle of the day (10 a.m. to 1 p.m.) and an afternoon slump. At night, circadian rhythms cause the hormone melatonin to rise, making a person sleepy. <Br><Br> Learn more in NIGMS’ circadian rhythms <a href="https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/fact-sheets/Pages/circadian-rhythms.aspx">featured topics page</a>. <Br><Br>See <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6612">6612</a> for the Spanish version of this infographic. 1/5/2024 4:54:05 PM1/5/2024 4:54:05 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified CR_TeenTimeline_Opt3B_M    Medium 343 KB 2/12/2021 9:29 AM Walter, Taylor (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx6090https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{824D535B-F568-41B6-99E0-0EFFC580F9A2}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
36311019This pig cell is in the process of dividing. The chromosomes (purple) have already replicated and the duplicates are being pulled apart by fibers of the cell skeleton known as microtubules (green). Studies of cell division yield knowledge that is critical to advancing understanding of many human diseases, including cancer and birth defects. This image is part of the Life: Magnified collection, which was displayed in the Gateway Gallery at Washington Dulles International Airport June 3, 2014, to January 21, 2015. To see all 46 images in this exhibit, go to https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/life-magnified/Pages/default.aspx.11/22/2022 9:04:26 PM11/22/2022 9:04:26 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 5_topright_Cells_Dividing_M    Medium 280 KB 11/23/2020 4:20 PM Walter, Taylor (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx3280https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{3A073DA6-DE49-471A-8C0A-06C39439A720}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2541826DNA consists of two long, twisted chains made up of nucleotides. Each nucleotide contains one base, one phosphate molecule, and the sugar molecule deoxyribose. The bases in DNA nucleotides are adenine, thymine, cytosine, and guanine. See image 2542 for a labeled version of this illustration. Featured in <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/thenewgenetics/ target="_blank"><i>The New Genetics</i></a>.10/16/2020 4:08:27 PM10/16/2020 4:08:27 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Nucleotides_S    Low 63 KB 8/24/2016 3:55 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx68130https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{0968D0F4-3202-4345-AA11-D0A735FCEFB7}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
25431010During DNA replication, each strand of the original molecule acts as a template for the synthesis of a new, complementary DNA strand. See image 2544 for a labeled version of this illustration. Featured in <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/thenewgenetics/ target="_blank"><i>The New Genetics</i></a>.10/16/2020 4:57:47 PM10/16/2020 4:57:47 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified DNA_Replication_S    Low 86 KB 7/28/2016 4:12 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx6480https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{191DE30D-8C6F-437B-9B79-D953A32EDA5A}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
1019628A light microscope image of cells from the endosperm of an African globe lily (<i>Scadoxus katherinae</i>). This is one frame of a time-lapse sequence that shows cell division in action. The lily is considered a good organism for studying cell division because its chromosomes are much thicker and easier to see than human ones. Staining shows microtubules in red and chromosomes in blue. Here, two cells have formed after a round of mitosis.5/9/2022 1:48:10 PM5/9/2022 1:48:10 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified lilymit13_S    Low 13 KB 9/8/2016 3:03 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C The lily is considered a good organism for studying cell division because its chromosomes are much thicker and easier to see STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx4260https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{F7A7A261-CDEE-485E-8F24-D1923EE9C099}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
67711226Mosquito larvae with genes edited by CRISPR swimming in water. This species of mosquito, <em>Culex quinquefasciatus</em>, can transmit West Nile virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, and avian malaria, among other diseases. The researchers who took this video optimized the gene-editing tool CRISPR for <em>Culex quinquefasciatus</em> that could ultimately help stop the mosquitoes from spreading pathogens. The work is described in the <em>Nature Communications</em> paper "<a href=https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-021-23239-0>Optimized CRISPR tools and site-directed transgenesis towards gene drive development in <em>Culex quinquefasciatus</em> mosquitoes</a>" by Feng et al. Related to images <a href=https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6769>6769</a> and <a href=https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6770>6770</a>. 4/28/2023 7:19:19 PM4/28/2023 7:19:19 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified MosquitoLarvae_VideoStill    Thumbnail 1025 KB 6/28/2021 8:49 AM Dolan, Lauren (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx4770https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{09B18D1C-0C3C-4F6B-9DDD-7BA19EE5AE1A}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2552694Arranging exons in different patterns, called alternative splicing, enables cells to make different proteins from a single gene. See image 2553 for a labeled version of this illustration. Featured in <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/thenewgenetics/ target="_blank"><i>The New Genetics</i></a>.10/23/2020 5:23:14 PM10/23/2020 5:23:14 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Alternative_Splicing_S    Low 42 KB 8/25/2016 5:50 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx5170https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{476C387D-344E-4357-BAC4-F2CA9D225981}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2758510This photograph shows a magnified view of a <i>Drosophila melanogaster</i> pupa in cross section. Compare this normal pupa to one that lacks an important receptor, shown in image 2759.8/21/2020 7:26:54 PM8/21/2020 7:26:54 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Control_S    Low 16 KB 9/14/2016 11:26 AM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx4960https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{790A2C6F-2A21-48D4-8215-1A3D8B97D2B6}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
1315584Duplicated pair of chromosomes lined up and ready to cross over. Appears in the NIGMS booklet <a href="http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/insidethecell/" target="_blank"><i>Inside the Cell</i></a>.10/28/2020 7:55:49 PM10/28/2020 7:55:49 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified ITC_CrossOver_before_Copy_M    Medium 28 KB 10/28/2020 3:55 PM McCulley, Jennifer (NIH/NIDCD) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx3650https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{7DA1442C-F0F8-43B2-9FD4-4D84902CCDFE}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2588704Each point in these colorful patchworks represents the correlation between two sleep-associated genes in fruit flies. Vibrant reds and oranges represent high and intermediate degrees of association between the genes, respectively. Genes in these areas show similar activity patterns in different fly lines. Cool blues represent gene pairs where one partner's activity is high and the other's is low. The green areas show pairs with activities that are not correlated. These quilt-like depictions help illustrate a recent finding that genes act in teams to influence sleep patterns. Featured in the March 18, 2009, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/09-03-18/index.html#1 target="_blank"><i>Biomedical Beat</i></a>.10/30/2020 4:36:12 PM10/30/2020 4:36:12 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Genetic_Patchworks_L    Low 7 KB 6/3/2016 3:13 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C These quilt-like depictions help illustrate a recent finding that genes act in teams STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx4050https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{9278DACA-CDE9-4603-ABF2-F12270ED332C}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2330783Like a watch wrapped around a wrist, a special enzyme encircles the double helix to repair a broken strand of DNA. Without molecules that can mend such breaks, cells can malfunction, die, or become cancerous. Featured in the November 21, 2006, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/06-11-21/#1 target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>. Related to image <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID=561">3493</a>10/29/2020 2:16:53 PM10/29/2020 2:16:53 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified GDB--DNA_unwinding_recolored_medium_resolution_    Medium 185 KB 6/3/2016 3:08 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx4360https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{7570FB61-EFD0-4B1B-B181-74BE0D6AAB1B}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2455810A team of chemists and physicists used nanotechnology and DNA's ability to self-assemble with matching RNA to create a new kind of chip for measuring gene activity. When RNA of a gene of interest binds to a DNA tile (gold squares), it creates a raised surface (white areas) that can be detected by a powerful microscope. This nanochip approach offers manufacturing and usage advantages over existing gene chips and is a key step toward detecting gene activity in a single cell. Featured in the February 20, 2008, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/08-02-20/index.html#1 target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.8/20/2020 5:51:20 PM8/20/2020 5:51:20 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2455_Gold_gene_S    Low 127 KB 3/29/2019 11:27 AM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx5160https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{1D011269-3AA9-44C4-8D58-702C27B5F5B6}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2626835The 46 human chromosomes are shown in blue, with the telomeres appearing as white pinpoints. The DNA has already been copied, so each chromosome is actually made up of two identical lengths of DNA, each with its own two telomeres.11/6/2020 8:58:08 PM11/6/2020 8:58:08 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified telomere_FISH_M    Medium 31 KB 11/6/2020 4:02 PM Walter, Taylor (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx3570https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{3A7A4467-E921-43F0-B27B-B8317169EF43}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2684842<i>Dictyostelium discoideum</i> is a microscopic amoeba. A group of 100,000 form a mound as big as a grain of sand. Featured in <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/thenewgenetics/ target="_blank"><i>The New Genetics</i></a>.11/6/2020 9:14:47 PM11/6/2020 9:14:47 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified dicty_fruit_M    Medium 83 KB 7/28/2016 3:53 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx4460https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{65791521-16B6-4696-B5EA-EAC060CF88F8}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2733905Early on, this <i>Arabidopsis</i> plant embryo picks sides: While one end will form the shoot, the other will take root underground. Short pieces of RNA in the bottom half (blue) make sure that shoot-forming genes are expressed only in the embryo's top half (green), eventually allowing a seedling to emerge with stems and leaves. Like animals, plants follow a carefully orchestrated polarization plan and errors can lead to major developmental defects, such as shoots above and below ground. Because the complex gene networks that coordinate this development in plants and animals share important similarities, studying polarity in <i>Arabidopsis</i>--a model organism--could also help us better understand human development. Featured in the April 21, 2010, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/10-04-21/index.html#1 target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.8/12/2020 5:48:27 PM8/12/2020 5:48:27 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Arabidopsis    High 30 KB 6/3/2016 3:16 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Like animals, plants follow a carefully orchestrated polarization plan and errors can lead to major developmental defects, such as STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx4360https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{C2874526-938B-4961-ADB3-8FC981D7D983}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3607967A fruit fly ovary, shown here, contains as many as 20 eggs. Fruit flies are not merely tiny insects that buzz around overripe fruit--they are a venerable scientific tool. Research on the flies has shed light on many aspects of human biology, including biological rhythms, learning, memory and neurodegenerative diseases. Another reason fruit flies are so useful in a lab (and so successful in fruit bowls) is that they reproduce rapidly. About three generations can be studied in a single month. <Br><Br>Related to image <a href="http://images.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3656" target=_blank>3656</a>. This image is part of the Life: Magnified collection, which was displayed in the Gateway Gallery at Washington Dulles International Airport June 3, 2014, to January 21, 2015. To see all 46 images in this exhibit, go to https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/life-magnified/Pages/default.aspx.10/18/2023 2:55:12 PM10/18/2023 2:55:12 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 4_Montell.Blue_Ovary_M    Medium 613 KB 7/27/2016 11:27 AM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx3570https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{AF7AA717-E49F-4A98-9A4A-36CF9410C900}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3609968Those of us who get sneezy and itchy-eyed every spring or fall may have pollen grains, like those shown here, to blame. Pollen grains are the male germ cells of plants, released to fertilize the corresponding female plant parts. When they are instead inhaled into human nasal passages, they can trigger allergies. This image is part of the Life: Magnified collection, which was displayed in the Gateway Gallery at Washington Dulles International Airport June 3, 2014, to January 21, 2015. To see all 46 images in this exhibit, go to https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/life-magnified/Pages/default.aspx.11/28/2022 9:44:31 PM11/28/2022 9:44:31 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 6_2_pollen-grains-yellow    Other 56981 KB 10/25/2020 8:58 PM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx3360https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{509580B6-CE4A-4AED-8738-B548E6B15C0F}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3782988Each of the colored specs in this image is a cell on the surface of a fish scale. To better understand how wounds heal, scientists have inserted genes that make cells brightly glow in different colors into the skin cells of zebrafish, a fish often used in laboratory research. The colors enable the researchers to track each individual cell, for example, as it moves to the location of a cut or scrape over the course of several days. These technicolor fish endowed with glowing skin cells dubbed "skinbow" provide important insight into how tissues recover and regenerate after an injury. <Br><Br>For more information on skinbow fish, see the Biomedical Beat blog post <a href="https://biobeat.nigms.nih.gov/2016/04/visualizing-skin-regeneration-in-real-time/">Visualizing Skin Regeneration in Real Time</a> and <a href="http://today.duke.edu/2016/03/zebrafish">a press release from Duke University highlighting this research</a>. Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID=717"> image 3783</a>.2/4/2020 3:21:30 PM2/4/2020 3:21:30 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 20160509-skinbow-fin-1_M    Medium 299 KB 6/3/2016 3:41 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Each of the colored specs in this image is a cell on STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx4660https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{9F84C2FE-EA85-4A26-AADA-4915D6443B3B}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3789993The nucleolus is a small but very important protein complex located in the cell's nucleus. It forms on the chromosomes at the location where the genes for the RNAs are that make up the structure of the ribosome, the indispensable cellular machine that make proteins from messenger RNAs.<Br><Br> However, how the nucleolus grows and maintains its structure has puzzled scientists for some time. It turns out that even though it looks like a simple liquid blob, it's rather well-organized, consisting of three distinct layers: the fibrillar center, where the RNA polymerase is active; the dense fibrillar component, which is enriched in the protein fibrillarin; and the granular component, which contains a protein called nucleophosmin. Researchers have now discovered that this multilayer structure of the nucleolus arises from difference in how the proteins in each compartment mix with water and with each other. These differences let them readily separate from each other into the three nucleolus compartments. <Br><Br>This video of nucleoli in the eggs of a commonly used lab animal, the frog Xenopus laevis, shows how each of the compartments (the granular component is shown in red, the fibrillarin in yellow-green, and the fibrillar center in blue) spontaneously fuse with each other on encounter without mixing with the other compartments. For more details on this research, see <a href="http://www.princeton.edu/main/news/archive/S46/35/80M01/?section=topstories">this press release from Princeton.</a> Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID=721"> video 3791</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID=722"> image 3792</a> and <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID=723"> image 3793</a>.12/17/2020 7:25:03 PM12/17/2020 7:25:03 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Composite_combo_label    High 746 KB 6/28/2016 3:33 PM Hall, Monique (NIH/NCI) [C Please let me know if you STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx4260https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{8A8A26C8-4CB6-481F-972E-8E85FDE07585}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
67691224A mosquito larva with genes edited by CRISPR. The red-orange glow is a fluorescent protein used to track the edits. This species of mosquito, <em>Culex quinquefasciatus</em>, can transmit West Nile virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, and avian malaria, among other diseases. The researchers who took this image developed a gene-editing toolkit for <em>Culex quinquefasciatus</em> that could ultimately help stop the mosquitoes from spreading pathogens. The work is described in the <em>Nature Communications</em> paper "<a href=https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-021-23239-0>Optimized CRISPR tools and site-directed transgenesis towards gene drive development in <em>Culex quinquefasciatus</em> mosquitoes</a>" by Feng et al. Related to image <a href=https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6770>6770</a> and video <a href=https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6771>6771</a>. 7/6/2021 7:00:39 PM7/6/2021 7:00:39 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified MosquitoLarva_M    Medium 19 KB 6/27/2021 9:26 PM Dolan, Lauren (NIH/NIGMS) [C The work is described in the STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx3860https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{A8C5E363-3325-42F7-9166-04FB7C951AB9}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
66141285Los ritmos circadianos son cambios físicos, mentales y de comportamiento que siguen un ciclo de 24 horas. Los ritmos circadianos se ven influenciados por la luz y están regulados por el núcleo supraquiasmático del cerebro, a veces denominado el reloj principal. <Br><Br> Vea <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6613">6613</a> para la versión en inglés de esta infografía. 12/6/2023 4:12:13 PM12/6/2023 4:12:13 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified CR_Brain_Spanish_M    Medium 27 KB 2/12/2021 9:45 AM Walter, Taylor (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx5360https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{18FEB071-FF12-43AF-81D3-880E37E4767C}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
37191026This illustration shows, in simplified terms, how the CRISPR-Cas9 system can be used as a gene-editing tool. The illustration includes a cartoon with four frames and a fifth frame with potential applications. For an explanation and overview of the CRISPR-Cas9 system, see the NIGMS Biomedical Beat blog entry at https://biobeat.nigms.nih.gov/2014/09/field-focus-precision-gene-editing-with-crispr/ and the iBiology video at http://www.ibiology.org/ibiomagazine/jennifer-doudna-genome-engineering-with-crispr-cas9-birth-of-a-breakthrough-technology.html.12/2/2020 7:43:16 PM12/2/2020 7:43:16 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified CRISPR_Illustrations_2015    High 391 KB 2/5/2019 4:10 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx5570https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{8ADE9DDC-DC6D-4823-A1CC-7FF33FC2C0A6}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131