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2500620Glucose (top) and sucrose (bottom) are sugars made of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen atoms. Carbohydrates include simple sugars like these and are the main source of energy for the human body. Featured in <a href=http://www.nigms.nih.gov/Publications/Findings.htm target="_blank"><i>Findings</i></a>, October 2004.9/18/2020 5:38:14 PM9/18/2020 5:38:14 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2500_Carbo_S    Low 72 KB 3/29/2019 11:22 AM Constantinides Chemistry, Biochemistry, and Pharmacology STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx12450https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{4BBA85A5-2765-4B80-B5A0-6FBB730B3229}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2795917Ecteinascidin 743 (ET-743, brand name Yondelis), was discovered and isolated from a sea squirt, <i>Ecteinascidia turbinata</i>, by NIGMS grantee Kenneth Rinehart at the University of Illinois. It was synthesized by NIGMS grantees E.J. Corey and later by Samuel Danishefsky. It is being tested for the treatment of several types of cancer. Multiple versions of this structure are available as entries 2790-2797.2/22/2021 9:13:50 PM2/22/2021 9:13:50 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified ET_743_2_L    Low 5 KB 6/3/2016 3:17 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C It was synthesized by NIGMS grantees E.J. STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx10550https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{86C9B538-29A6-4393-97EA-0AFC5C537F94}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
67671222CCD-1 is an enzyme produced by the bacterium <em>Clostridioides difficile</em> that helps it resist antibiotics. Using X-ray crystallography, researchers determined the structure of a complex between CCD-1 and the antibiotic cefotaxime (purple, yellow, and blue molecule). The structure revealed that CCD-1 provides extensive hydrogen bonding (shown as dotted lines) and stabilization of the antibiotic in the active site, leading to efficient degradation of the antibiotic. <Br><Br> Related to images <a href="/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID2=6764">6764</a>, <a href="/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID2=6765">6765</a>, and <a href="/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID2=6766">6766</a>.5/16/2022 3:26:06 PM5/16/2022 3:26:06 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Space-fillingModelCCD-1_L    Low 12 KB 9/21/2021 4:49 PM Dolan, Lauren (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx107100https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{DC0297AE-E276-460D-AA55-B9F0AD00D6B9}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
67791335A representation of a patient’s brain waves after receiving the anesthetic propofol. All anesthetics create brain wave changes that vary depending on the patient’s age and the type and dose of anesthetic used. These changes are visible in raw electroencephalogram (EEG) readings, but they’re easier to interpret using a spectrogram where the signals are broken down by time (x-axis), frequency (y-axis), and power (color scale). This spectrogram shows the changes in brain waves before, during, and after propofol-induced anesthesia. The patient is unconscious from minute 5, upon propofol administration, through minute 69 (change in power and frequency). But, between minutes 35 and 48, the patient fell into a profound state of unconsciousness (disappearance of dark red oscillations between 8 to 12 Hz), which required the anesthesiologist to adjust the rate of propofol administration. The propofol was stopped at minute 62 and the patient woke up around minute 69. 8/24/2021 4:39:56 PM8/24/2021 4:39:56 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified BrainWave_M    Medium 21 KB 8/24/2021 10:01 AM Dolan, Lauren (NIH Chemistry, Biochemistry, and Pharmacology STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx11950https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{C3772696-F92C-4368-A787-557CB4E82840}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2519493Ionic and covalent bonds hold molecules, like sodium chloride and chlorine gas, together. Hydrogen bonds among molecules, notably involving water, also play an important role in biology. Featured in <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/chemhealth/ target="_blank"><i>The Chemistry of Health</i></a>.3/4/2022 8:07:29 PM3/4/2022 8:07:29 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified _S    Low 51 KB 9/7/2016 1:38 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C Chemistry, Biochemistry, and Pharmacology STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx10970https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{B68ABE36-9603-48F3-853E-500DEDC03CA5}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
69721350The SARS-CoV-2 virus (the virus that causes COVID-19) has a spike protein that it uses like a tool to break into and infect cells. On its own, the spike protein is harmless and can be used as a tool to train your immune system to defend against the virus. <Br><Br> Step 1: Scientists make copies of mRNA with instructions that tell the human body how to make only the outer spike protein of SARS-CoV-2. <Br><Br> Step 2: mRNA is packaged inside tiny globules called lipid nanoparticles. Lipids (fatty acids) are used as the vehicle because they: Protect the mRNA from breaking down Help it pass through cell membranes and into the body's cells <Br><Br> Step 3: The vaccine's mRNA instructions pass into muscle cells (near where a vaccine injection is given), and those muscle cells make copies of the spike protein. <Br><Br> Step 4: Though the spikes are harmless, the body’s immune system recognizes them as antigens (foreign substances) and produces targeted antibodies to defend against them. <Br><Br> Step 5: The body eliminates the vaccine material. Special white blood cells called memory cells "remember" the spike protein and which antibodies to make if they happen upon the spike again. <Br><Br> Step 6: If SARS-CoV-2 (and its telltale spike proteins) enter a vaccinated person's body, the immune system reacts with antibodies that defend against infection more swiftly than it otherwise could if it had never seen the spike protein. <Br><Br> Featured in <a href="https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/pathways/Pages/Home.aspx#vaccines">“<em>Pathways:</em> Vaccine Science.”</a> 5/13/2024 5:14:37 PM5/13/2024 5:14:37 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Journey of an mRNA Vaccine_S    Low 54 KB 11/7/2023 9:22 AM Crowley, Rachel (NIH/NIGMS) [E STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx15990https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{A0D98018-1AF5-4488-A9F4-9845F6C44226}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2791913Ecteinascidin 743 (ET-743, brand name Yondelis), was discovered and isolated from a sea squirt, <i>Ecteinascidia turbinata</i>, by NIGMS grantee Kenneth Rinehart at the University of Illinois. It was synthesized by NIGMS grantees E.J. Corey and later by Samuel Danishefsky. It is being tested for the treatment of several types of cancer. Multiple versions of this structure are available as entries 2790-2797.2/22/2021 9:16:48 PM2/22/2021 9:16:48 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified ET743_withhydrogens2_M    Medium 15 KB 6/3/2016 3:17 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx11660https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{7E9FE313-7ECC-410F-8624-D1F7D0E636A4}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
69851304<em> Drosophila </em> adult brain showing that an adipokine (fat hormone) generates a response from neurons (aqua) and regulates insulin-producing neurons (red). <Br><Br>Related to images <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6982">6982</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6983">6983</a>, and <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6984">6984</a>.12/19/2023 9:06:13 PM12/19/2023 9:06:13 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Since the images are too large to attach I have uploaded them at this google drive link and you should be able to download it the link STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx161150https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{B16A02E1-AF2B-43FE-A6EC-37FF25432F66}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3412539Active Site of E. coli response regulator PhoB12/23/2020 8:56:09 PM12/23/2020 8:56:09 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified I have an image at 8,000 x 8000 Ann Professor, Department of Biochemistry Associate Director, Center for Advanced STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx10070https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{6EE05E04-C77C-409C-9469-654526ACE090}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2750847Antibodies are among the most promising therapies for certain forms of cancer, but patients must take them intravenously, exposing healthy tissues to the drug and increasing the risk of side effects. A team of biochemists packed the anticancer antibodies into porous silica particles to deliver a heavy dose directly to tumors in mice. Featured in the June 16, 2010, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/10-06-16/index.html#3 target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.8/21/2020 5:49:28 PM8/21/2020 5:49:28 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Chemistry, Biochemistry, and Pharmacology Antibody, Biochemistry, Biochemical, Drug Delivery, Immune System STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx109100https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{E388DAB4-31DB-4ECE-9ED5-AE2F1152C395}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
57521192Antibiotic resistance in microbes is a serious health concern. So researchers have turned their attention to how bacteria undo the action of some antibiotics. Here, scientists set out to find the conditions that help individual bacterial cells survive in the presence of the antibiotic rifampicin. The research team used Mycobacterium smegmatis, a more harmless relative of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which infects the lung and other organs to cause serious disease.<Br><Br> In this video, genetically identical mycobacteria are growing in a miniature growth chamber called a microfluidic chamber. Using live imaging, the researchers found that individual mycobacteria will respond differently to the antibiotic, depending on the growth stage and other timing factors. The researchers used genetic tagging with green fluorescent protein to distinguish cells that can resist rifampicin and those that cannot. With this gene tag, cells tolerant of the antibiotic light up in green and those that are susceptible in violet, enabling the team to monitor the cells' responses in real time. <Br><Br> To learn more about how the researchers studied antibiotic resistance in Mycobacterium, see <a href="http://now.tufts.edu/news-releases/individual-mycobacteria-respond-differently-antibiotics-based-growth-and-timing">this news release from Tufts University</a>. Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID=2986">image 5751</a>. 12/18/2020 4:30:09 PM12/18/2020 4:30:09 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 5752_SSBGFP_RIF2_40ul_100313_22_R3D_final-1_S    Low 60 KB 3/28/2019 3:24 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx118100https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{B047CD99-8652-40DA-9486-2419FB70E5F6}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
57511191Antibiotic resistance in microbes is a serious health concern. So researchers have turned their attention to how bacteria undo the action of some antibiotics. Here, scientists set out to find the conditions that help individual bacterial cells survive in the presence of the antibiotic rifampicin. The research team used Mycobacterium smegmatis, a more harmless relative of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which infects the lung and other organs and causes serious disease. <Br><Br>In this image, genetically identical mycobacteria are growing in a miniature growth chamber called a microfluidic chamber. Using live imaging, the researchers found that individual mycobacteria will respond differently to the antibiotic, depending on the growth stage and other timing factors. The researchers used genetic tagging with green fluorescent protein to distinguish cells that can resist rifampicin and those that cannot. With this gene tag, cells tolerant of the antibiotic light up in green and those that are susceptible in violet, enabling the team to monitor the cells' responses in real time. <Br><Br> To learn more about how the researchers studied antibiotic resistance in Mycobacterium, see <a href="http://now.tufts.edu/news-releases/individual-mycobacteria-respond-differently-antibiotics-based-growth-and-timing">this news release from Tufts University</a>. Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID=2990">video 5752</a>.12/18/2020 4:27:18 PM12/18/2020 4:27:18 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 5751_SSBGFP_RIF2_40ul_100313_17_S    Low 107 KB 3/28/2019 3:25 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx12790https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{9AAEDFAF-443D-4710-BA88-4BEBD4E1B128}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3460549Recombinant proteins such as the prion protein shown here are often used to model how proteins misfold and sometimes polymerize in neurodegenerative disorders. This prion protein was expressed in E. coli, purified and fibrillized at pH 7. Image taken in 2004 for a research project by Roger Moore, Ph.D., at Rocky Mountain Laboratories that was published in 2007 in <i>Biochemistry</i>. This image was not used in the publication.8/31/2020 4:08:32 AM8/31/2020 4:08:32 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified that was published in 2007 in <i>Biochemistry</i>. This image was not used in the This image is also available in STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx12350https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{D61A0D04-06B0-47B0-B82D-4FEDA379609F}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3477551This image is a computer-generated model of the approximately 4.2 million atoms of the HIV capsid, the shell that contains the virus' genetic material. Scientists determined the exact structure of the capsid and the proteins that it's made of using a variety of imaging techniques and analyses. They then entered these data into a supercomputer that produced the atomic-level image of the capsid. This structural information could be used for developing drugs that target the capsid, possibly leading to more effective therapies11/14/2023 1:23:33 PM11/14/2023 1:23:33 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Capsid_M    Medium 77 KB 6/3/2016 3:30 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C This structural information could be used for developing STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx12650https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{4475C347-ACA7-4D71-B1A5-B70167940ACF}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
69831352Fat tissue from the abdomen of a genetically mosaic adult fruit fly. Genetic mosaicism means that the fly has cells with different genotypes even though it formed from a single zygote. This specific mosaicism results in accumulation of a critical fly adipokine (blue-green) within the fat tissue cells that have reduced expression a key nutrient sensing gene (in left panel). The dotted line shows the cells lacking the gene that is present and functioning in the rest of the cells. Nuclei are labelled in magenta. This image was captured using a confocal microscope and shows a maximum intensity projection of many slices. <Br><Br>Related to images <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6982">6982</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6984">6984</a>, and <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6985">6985</a>. 12/19/2023 7:15:52 PM12/19/2023 7:15:52 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified This image was captured using a confocal microscope and shows a maximum intensity projection of many slices STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx183260https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{3AA16265-C3FB-43F6-92DA-0F6B21B387B3}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3559959Luciferase-based imaging enables visualization and quantification of internal organs and transplanted cells in live adult zebrafish. This image shows how luciferase-based imaging could be used to visualize the heart for regeneration studies (left), or label all tissues for stem cell transplantation (right).10/5/2020 5:27:55 AM10/5/2020 5:27:55 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Poss-zebrafish-04_L    Low 35 KB 6/3/2016 3:31 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C br>For imagery of both the STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx12260https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{7E206F11-67B8-4B43-BEA6-8DD760F163C4}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3557957Luciferase-based imaging enables visualization and quantification of internal organs and transplanted cells in live adult zebrafish. In this image, a cardiac muscle-restricted promoter drives firefly luciferase expression (overhead view).10/5/2020 5:19:11 AM10/5/2020 5:19:11 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Poss-zebrafish-02_L    Low 20 KB 6/3/2016 3:31 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C br>For imagery of both the STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx12360https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{E71A3B27-F195-440D-B17B-B07940F5C51C}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2746843Sulfite oxidase is an enzyme that is essential for normal neurological development in children. This video shows the active site of the enzyme and its molybdenum cofactor visible as a faint ball-and-stick representation buried within the protein. The positively charged channel (blue) at the active site contains a chloride ion (green) and three water molecules (red). As the protein oscillates, one can see directly down the positively charged channel. At the bottom is the molybdenum atom of the active site (light blue) and its oxo group (red) that is transferred to sulfite to form sulfate in the catalytic reaction.8/18/2020 7:39:49 PM8/18/2020 7:39:49 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified activesite-thumb    Thumbnail 815 KB 6/21/2016 11:25 AM aavarkalavr (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx9460https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{F3FBD1F8-19E8-4FD9-8FFA-6D2A41F188E6}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3556956Luciferase-based imaging enables visualization and quantification of internal organs and transplanted cells in live adult zebrafish. In this image, a cardiac muscle-restricted promoter drives firefly luciferase expression. Lateral (Top) and overhead views (Bottom) are shown.10/5/2020 5:20:22 AM10/5/2020 5:20:22 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Poss-zebrafish-01    High 416 KB 6/3/2016 3:31 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C br>For imagery of the overhead STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx13140https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{3D1F01B8-728A-4F3D-B381-CF2B50DEAA2C}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2520494Ionic and covalent bonds hold molecules, like sodium chloride and chlorine gas, together. Hydrogen bonds among molecules, notably involving water, also play an important role in biology. Featured in <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/chemhealth/ target="_blank"><i>The Chemistry of Health</i></a>.3/4/2022 8:07:52 PM3/4/2022 8:07:52 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Ionic_Bond_with_labels_S    Low 63 KB 9/7/2016 1:40 PM Varkala Chemistry, Biochemistry, and Pharmacology STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx13670https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{9F762FC8-E8A7-4101-8994-5484E50DDCA8}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2490684This illustration of an epoxide-opening cascade promoted by water emulates the proposed biosynthesis of some of the Red Tide toxins.9/18/2020 5:17:23 PM9/18/2020 5:17:23 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Water_cascade_thumb    Thumbnail 25 KB 6/3/2016 3:12 PM aamishral2 Chemistry, Biochemistry, and Pharmacology STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx10440https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{2631C4DA-12B6-470A-9C8A-BC2049812B4D}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
67661221CCD-1 is an enzyme produced by the bacterium <em>Clostridioides difficile</em> that helps it resist antibiotics. Using X-ray crystallography, researchers determined the structure of a CCD-1 molecule and a molecule of the antibiotic cefotaxime bound together. The structure revealed that CCD-1 provides extensive hydrogen bonding and stabilization of the antibiotic in the active site, leading to efficient degradation of the antibiotic. <Br><Br> Related to images <a href="/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID2=6764">6764</a>, <a href="/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID2=6765">6765</a>, and <a href="/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID2=6767">6767</a>.5/16/2022 3:24:55 PM5/16/2022 3:24:55 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified RibbonDiagramCCD-1_L    Low 17 KB 9/21/2021 4:48 PM Dolan, Lauren (NIH/NIGMS) [C Clyde Smith got back to me STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx9970https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{F9E63C48-B791-4F6D-972F-72242ED07995}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2735906This network map shows the overlap (green) between the long QT syndrome (yellow) and epilepsy (blue) protein-interaction neighborhoods located within the human interactome. Researchers have learned to integrate genetic, cellular and clinical information to find out why certain medicines can trigger fatal heart arrhythmias. Featured in an <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/computinglife/genetic_framework.htm target="_blank">article in <em>Computing Life</em></a> magazine.8/12/2020 6:20:49 PM8/12/2020 6:20:49 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified interactome    High 190 KB 6/3/2016 3:16 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C This network map shows the overlap STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx120100https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{80D7AF32-601D-41D2-9352-A8BD0C90A035}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3787991T cells are white blood cells that are important in defending the body against bacteria, viruses and other pathogens. Each T cell carries proteins, called T-cell receptors, on its surface that are activated when they come in contact with an invader. This activation sets in motion a cascade of biochemical changes inside the T cell to mount a defense against the invasion. Scientists have been interested for some time what happens after a T-cell receptor is activated. One obstacle has been to study how this signaling cascade, or pathway, proceeds inside T cells. <Br><Br>In this video, researchers have created a T-cell receptor pathway consisting of 12 proteins outside the cell on an artificial membrane. The video shows three key steps during the signaling process: phosphorylation of the T-cell receptor (green), clustering of a protein called linker for activation of T cells (LAT) (blue) and polymerization of the cytoskeleton protein actin (red). The findings show that the T-cell receptor signaling proteins self-organize into separate physical and biochemical compartments. This new system of studying molecular pathways outside the cells will enable scientists to better understand how the immune system combats microbes or other agents that cause infection. <Br><Br>To learn more how researchers assembled this T-cell receptor pathway, see <a href="http://www.mbl.edu/blog/building-immunity-mbl-whitman-center-scientists-recreate-a-t-cell-receptor-signaling-pathway/">this press release from HHMI's Marine Biological Laboratory Whitman Center.</a> Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID=718">video 3786</a>.12/17/2020 7:19:29 PM12/17/2020 7:19:29 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified cluster_and_actin_L    Low 12 KB 6/3/2016 3:41 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C T cells are white blood cells STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx13970https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{3E41AE30-6072-43F1-86C1-6188D9BAAB8E}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
341194412/23/2020 8:54:32 PM12/23/2020 8:54:32 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Flred_O2v2_M    Medium 208 KB 2/22/2021 3:00 PM Dolan, Lauren (NIH Chemistry, Biochemistry, and Pharmacology STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx9060https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{41BBD39E-5495-44ED-8BDC-B4314668A18A}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
67651220CCD-1 is an enzyme produced by the bacterium <em>Clostridioides difficile</em> that helps it resist antibiotics. Researchers crystallized complexes where a CCD-1 molecule and a molecule of the antibiotic cefotaxime were bound together. Then, they shot X-rays at the complexes to determine their structure—a process known as X-ray crystallography. This image shows the X-ray diffraction pattern of a complex. <Br><Br> Related to images <a href="/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID2=6764">6764</a>, <a href="/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID2=6766">6766</a>, and <a href="/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID2=6767">6767</a>.5/16/2022 3:26:31 PM5/16/2022 3:26:31 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified XrayDiffraction_L    Low 6 KB 9/21/2021 4:48 PM Dolan, Lauren (NIH/NIGMS) [C Clyde Smith got back to me about STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx10090https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{B5CE3DD3-F09F-4A03-9773-4EA1AEC46D53}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
34911145A protein called kinesin (blue) is in charge of moving cargo around inside cells and helping them divide. It's powered by biological fuel called ATP (bright yellow) as it scoots along tube-like cellular tracks called microtubules (gray).9/8/2020 11:21:32 PM9/8/2020 11:21:32 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Would you allow us to do so, and would you please let us know how you would like Dept. of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry Yale University SHMC-E25 333 Cedar STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx10680https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{35B500A0-F314-4453-AED7-2C9A600F10D9}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2506624The arrangement of identical molecular components can make a dramatic difference. For example, carbon atoms can be arranged into dull graphite (left) or sparkly diamonds (right). Featured in <a href=http://www.nigms.nih.gov/Publications/Findings.htm target="_blank"><i>Findings</i></a>, March 2006.3/4/2022 8:16:57 PM3/4/2022 8:16:57 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Carbon_Building_Blocks_S    Low 59 KB 9/7/2016 1:28 PM Varkala Chemistry, Biochemistry, and Pharmacology STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx11760https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{6D21758B-DEDF-4EB0-8B13-5ADDC3714D21}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3425752A red poppy.8/12/2020 6:27:27 AM8/12/2020 6:27:27 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Poppy2_M    Medium 178 KB 6/3/2016 3:28 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS Chemistry, Biochemistry, and Pharmacology STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx11860https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{8CEC3946-F4C8-46CB-AFD9-91FF66C15706}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
37911186The nucleolus is a small but very important protein complex located in the cell's nucleus. It forms on the chromosomes at the location where the genes for the RNAs are that make up the structure of the ribosome, the indispensable cellular machine that make proteins from messenger RNAs. <Br><Br>However, how the nucleolus grows and maintains its structure has puzzled scientists for some time. It turns out that even though it looks like a simple liquid blob, it's rather well-organized, consisting of three distinct layers: the fibrillar center, where the RNA polymerase is active; the dense fibrillar component, which is enriched in the protein fibrillarin; and the granular component, which contains a protein called nucleophosmin. Researchers have now discovered that this multilayer structure of the nucleolus arises from differences in how the proteins in each compartment mix with water and with each other. These differences let the proteins readily separate from each other into the three nucleolus compartments. <Br><Br>This video of nucleoli in the eggs of a commonly used lab animal, the frog Xenopus laevis, shows how each of the compartments (the granular component is shown in red, the fibrillarin in yellow-green, and the fibrillar center in blue) spontaneously fuse with each other on encounter without mixing with the other compartments. <Br><Br>For more details on this research, see <a href="http://www.princeton.edu/main/news/archive/S46/35/80M01/?section=topstories">this press release from Princeton</a>. Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID=721"> video 3789</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID=723"> image 3792</a> and <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID=724"> image 3793</a>.12/17/2020 7:33:57 PM12/17/2020 7:33:57 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Nucleolus subcompartments spontaneously self-assemble 2    High 317 KB 6/28/2016 3:35 PM Hall, Monique (NIH STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx9470https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{A6372C2D-E2E0-4AD1-93E2-5109F3AFE1FC}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2687499A 3-D model of the alkaloid serratezomine A shows the molecule's complex ring structure.11/6/2020 9:17:27 PM11/6/2020 9:17:27 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2687_serraz_S    Low 64 KB 3/29/2019 11:02 AM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx12050https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{5431257C-AAD9-40BF-9BAB-6E622A528FF6}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3789993The nucleolus is a small but very important protein complex located in the cell's nucleus. It forms on the chromosomes at the location where the genes for the RNAs are that make up the structure of the ribosome, the indispensable cellular machine that make proteins from messenger RNAs.<Br><Br> However, how the nucleolus grows and maintains its structure has puzzled scientists for some time. It turns out that even though it looks like a simple liquid blob, it's rather well-organized, consisting of three distinct layers: the fibrillar center, where the RNA polymerase is active; the dense fibrillar component, which is enriched in the protein fibrillarin; and the granular component, which contains a protein called nucleophosmin. Researchers have now discovered that this multilayer structure of the nucleolus arises from difference in how the proteins in each compartment mix with water and with each other. These differences let them readily separate from each other into the three nucleolus compartments. <Br><Br>This video of nucleoli in the eggs of a commonly used lab animal, the frog Xenopus laevis, shows how each of the compartments (the granular component is shown in red, the fibrillarin in yellow-green, and the fibrillar center in blue) spontaneously fuse with each other on encounter without mixing with the other compartments. For more details on this research, see <a href="http://www.princeton.edu/main/news/archive/S46/35/80M01/?section=topstories">this press release from Princeton.</a> Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID=721"> video 3791</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID=722"> image 3792</a> and <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID=723"> image 3793</a>.12/17/2020 7:25:03 PM12/17/2020 7:25:03 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Composite_combo_label    High 746 KB 6/28/2016 3:33 PM Hall, Monique (NIH/NCI) [C Please let me know if you STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx11170https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{8A8A26C8-4CB6-481F-972E-8E85FDE07585}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3423750A white poppy.8/12/2020 6:24:02 AM8/12/2020 6:24:02 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Poppy1_crop    High 1077 KB 6/3/2016 3:28 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS Chemistry, Biochemistry, and Pharmacology STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx10680https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{0DE7F87E-F4A1-4015-A809-CAD027BE3B61}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3424751A white poppy.8/12/2020 6:26:03 AM8/12/2020 6:26:03 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Poppy1    High 981 KB 6/3/2016 3:28 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Chemistry, Biochemistry, and Pharmacology STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx10360https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{1E728609-C5CB-477C-91EB-B5D1E575D633}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2796918Ecteinascidin 743 (ET-743, brand name Yondelis), was discovered and isolated from a sea squirt, <i>Ecteinascidia turbinata</i>, by NIGMS grantee Kenneth Rinehart at the University of Illinois. It was synthesized by NIGMS grantees E.J. Corey and later by Samuel Danishefsky. It is being tested for the treatment of several types of cancer. Multiple versions of this structure are available as entries 2790-2797.2/22/2021 9:13:21 PM2/22/2021 9:13:21 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified ET_743_3_L    Low 6 KB 6/3/2016 3:18 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C It was synthesized by NIGMS grantees E.J. STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx12990https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{E6169F09-5DE1-4290-8EC8-33659920398D}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3558958Luciferase-based imaging enables visualization and quantification of internal organs and transplanted cells in live adult zebrafish. In this image, a cardiac muscle-restricted promoter drives firefly luciferase expression (lateral view).10/5/2020 5:23:30 AM10/5/2020 5:23:30 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Poss-zebrafish-03    High 488 KB 6/3/2016 3:31 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C br>For imagery of both the STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx13660https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{609B0D19-64A4-46CE-8F68-348417AC7AFA}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2529884Acetylsalicylate (bottom) is the aspirin of today. Adding a chemical tag called an acetyl group (shaded yellow box, bottom) to a molecule derived from willow bark (salicylate, top) makes the molecule less acidic (and easier on the lining of the digestive tract), but still effective at relieving pain. See image 2530 for a labeled version of this illustration. Featured in <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/medbydesign/ target="_blank"><i>Medicines By Design</i></a>.11/4/2021 6:30:06 PM11/4/2021 6:30:06 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Aspirin_M    Medium 107 KB 8/24/2016 5:10 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH Chemistry, Biochemistry, and Pharmacology STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx11470https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{82B883E5-73EC-491D-9FEC-C25CB3BCBDCE}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2525691To become products, reactants must overcome an energy hill. Featured in <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/chemhealth/ target="_blank"><i>The Chemistry of Health</i></a>.3/4/2022 7:59:11 PM3/4/2022 7:59:11 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Activation_Energy_S    Low 28 KB 9/7/2016 1:47 PM Varkala, Venkat Chemistry, Biochemistry, and Pharmacology STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx10760https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{195789AE-79C3-4A9E-B934-E39A816616B8}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3481946<i>Bacillus anthracis</i> (anthrax) cells being killed by a fluorescent trans-translation inhibitor, which disrupts bacterial protein synthesis. The inhibitor is naturally fluorescent and looks blue when it is excited by ultraviolet light in the microscope. This is a black-and-white version of <a href="http://images.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3525">Image 3525</a>.8/31/2020 5:16:14 AM8/31/2020 5:16:14 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Keiler Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology The Pennsylvania State STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx11650https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{2DD9A7C7-B93E-45FA-B603-A2648ED6126A}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
37201027This wreath represents the molecular structure of a protein, Cas4, which is part of a system, known as CRISPR, that bacteria use to protect themselves against viral invaders. The green ribbons show the protein's structure, and the red balls show the location of iron and sulfur molecules important for the protein's function. Scientists harnessed Cas9, a different protein in the bacterial CRISPR system, to create a gene-editing tool known as CRISPR-Cas9. Using this tool, researchers are able to study a range of cellular processes and human diseases more easily, cheaply and precisely. In December, 2015, Science magazine recognized the CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing tool as the "breakthrough of the year." Read more about Cas4 in the December 2015 Biomedical Beat post <a href="https://biobeat.nigms.nih.gov/2015/12/cool-images-a-holiday-themed-collection/">A Holiday-Themed Image Collection</a>.12/3/2020 8:52:01 PM12/3/2020 8:52:01 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Cas4_PDB_4ic11_M    Medium 377 KB 6/3/2016 3:39 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Read more about Cas4 in the STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx12980https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{2943035F-E71B-47B6-B359-C2925A36BC57}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3414541X-ray co-crystal structure of Src kinase bound to a DNA-templated macrocycle inhibitor. Found in the journal, Nature, Chemical Biology 8, 366-374 (2012). Series of seven images. Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3413">image 3413</a> , <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3415">image 3415</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3416">image 3416</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3417">image 3417</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3418">image 3418</a> and <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3419">image 3419</a>.12/23/2020 11:04:41 PM12/23/2020 11:04:41 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified binding_site_of_Src_kinase_for_macrocycle_inhibitors    High 375 KB 6/3/2016 3:28 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx9550https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{FC3B2E45-4B75-43F5-AB53-B66E4E536897}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
7000355216PETase enzyme degrades polyester plastic (polyethylene terephthalate, or PET) into monohydroxyethyl terephthalate (MHET). Then, MHETase enzyme degrades MHET into its constituents ethylene glycol (EG) and terephthalic acid (TPA). <Br><Br> Find these in the RCSB Protein Data Bank: <a href="https://www.rcsb.org/structure/5XH3"> PET hydrolase</a> (PDB entry 5XH3) and <a href="https://www.rcsb.org/structure/6QGA">MHETase</a> (PDB entry 6QGA). 2/5/2024 1:57:24 PM2/5/2024 1:57:24 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Plastic-eating Enzymes_S    Low 22 KB 2/2/2024 3:56 PM Crowley, Rachel (NIH/NIGMS) [E STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx11980https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{CAF08A2A-3954-4304-9653-A277D24F80A0}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
69821351Fourteen neurons (magenta) in the adult <em> Drosophila </em> brain produce insulin, and fat tissue sends packets of lipids to the brain via the lipoprotein carriers (green). This image was captured using a confocal microscope and shows a maximum intensity projection of many slices. <Br><Br>Related to images <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6983">6983</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6984">6984</a>, and <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6985">6985</a>.12/19/2023 7:12:13 PM12/19/2023 7:12:13 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified #1_Dilp ApoII_M    Medium 320 KB 12/19/2023 2:13 PM Crowley, Rachel (NIH/NIGMS) [E Please let me know if you STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx16380https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{6519601A-B4F6-4AFB-89E6-4BA77ECF4F0A}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
69841353Adult <em> Drosophila </em> abdominal fat tissue showing cell nuclei labelled in magenta. The upper panel is from well-fed flies, and the lower panel is from flies that have been deprived of food for 4 hours. Starvation results in the accumulation of a key adipokine—a fat hormone (blue-green dots). <Br><Br>Related to images <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6982">6982</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6983">6983</a>, and <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6985">6985</a>. 12/19/2023 7:20:12 PM12/19/2023 7:20:12 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Fruit fly starvation leads to adipokine accumulation Grant R35GM124593 Hi Rachel, Thanks for your patience STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx147110https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{2A53FE31-B0EC-473D-9167-49D04F359832}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2530885Acetylsalicylate (bottom) is the aspirin of today. Adding a chemical tag called an acetyl group (shaded yellow box, bottom) to a molecule derived from willow bark (salicylate, top) makes the molecule less acidic (and easier on the lining of the digestive tract), but still effective at relieving pain. See image 2529 for an unlabled version of this illustration. Featured in <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/medbydesign/ target="_blank"><i>Medicines By Design</i></a>.11/4/2021 6:29:28 PM11/4/2021 6:29:28 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Aspirin_with_labels_S    Low 59 KB 8/24/2016 5:08 PM Varkala Chemistry, Biochemistry, and Pharmacology STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx8950https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{E91F2178-2296-4919-BAC6-20EE3F3867E7}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2517818The world's smallest motor, ATP synthase, generates energy for the cell. Featured in <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/chemhealth/ target="_blank"><i>The Chemistry of Health</i></a>.3/4/2022 8:12:48 PM3/4/2022 8:12:48 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified ATP_Synthase_S    Low 31 KB 9/7/2016 5:10 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH Chemistry, Biochemistry, and Pharmacology STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx10140https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{D1A7A91C-A2ED-43E1-9830-0FEE474B8E93}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
68021260Colonies of bacteria growing despite high concentrations of antibiotics. These colonies are visible both by eye, as seen on the left, and by bioluminescence imaging, as seen on the right. The bioluminescent color indicates the metabolic activity of these bacteria, with their red centers indicating high metabolism. <Br><Br> More information about the research that produced this image can be found in the <em> Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy</em> paper <a href="https://journals.asm.org/doi/full/10.1128/AAC.00623-20">“Novel aminoglycoside-tolerant phoenix colony variants of <em>Pseudomonas aeruginosa</em>”</a> by Sindeldecker et al. 10/18/2023 2:59:29 PM10/18/2023 2:59:29 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Antibiotic-Surviving Colonies_M    Medium 191 KB 1/20/2022 1:26 PM Crowley, Rachel (NIH/NIGMS) [E STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx12380https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{2C4F99B5-84EA-444E-9ADF-97BFF7281A42}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3413540X-ray co-crystal structure of Src kinase bound to a DNA-templated macrocycle inhibitor. Found in the journal, Nature, Chemical Biology 8, 366-374 (2012). Series of seven images. Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3414">image 3414</a> , <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3415">image 3415</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3416">image 3416</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3417">image 3417</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3418">image 3418</a> and <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3419">image 3419</a>.12/23/2020 11:02:46 PM12/23/2020 11:02:46 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified macrocycle4b_copy_M    Medium 66 KB 6/3/2016 3:28 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C WE are happy to give you STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx8480https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{082D0675-FCFD-4E1E-9ECB-FE9441E456BA}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2533888Dose-response curves determine how much of a drug (X-axis) causes a particular effect, or a side effect, in the body (Y-axis). Featured in <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/medbydesign/ target="_blank"><i>Medicines By Design</i></a>.10/9/2020 4:27:14 PM10/9/2020 4:27:14 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2533_Dose_Response_S    Low 129 KB 3/29/2019 11:21 AM Chemistry, Biochemistry, and Pharmacology STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx11580https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{25E2AAE4-03CC-49FB-AE99-FBA34681EC7B}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
68501339A model of the molecule himastatin overlaid on an image of <em>Bacillus subtilis bacteria</em>. Scientists first isolated himastatin from the bacterium <em>Streptomyces himastatinicus</em>, and the molecule shows antibiotic activity. The researchers who created this image developed a new, more concise way to synthesize himastatin so it can be studied more easily. They also tested the effects of himastatin and derivatives of the molecule on <em>B. subtilis</em>. <Br><Br> More information about the research that produced this image can be found in the <em>Science</em> paper <a href="https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.abm6509">“Total synthesis of himastatin”</a> by D’Angelo et al. <Br><Br> Related to image <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6848">6848</a> and video <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6851">6851</a>. 3/7/2022 9:11:07 PM3/7/2022 9:11:07 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified HimastatinWithBacteria_S    Low 15 KB 3/7/2022 2:12 PM Dolan, Lauren (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx12760https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{C3545F09-F097-4469-B1CC-15E3DD7DF103}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131