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1311394Cell mopping up. Appears in the NIGMS booklet <a href="http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/insidethecell/" target="_blank"><i>Inside the Cell</i></a>.10/28/2020 7:44:08 PM10/28/2020 7:44:08 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 1311_CellMop_thumbnail - S    Low 49 KB 3/11/2019 3:30 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{6363666A-7C87-40F1-B3E9-0F5A186AA16F}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
1312395A number of environmental factors cause DNA mutations that can lead to cancer: toxins in cigarette smoke, sunlight and other radiation, and some viruses. Appears in the NIGMS booklet <a href="http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/insidethecell/" target="_blank"><i>Inside the Cell</i></a>.10/28/2020 7:47:01 PM10/28/2020 7:47:01 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified ITC_CellToxins_Copy_M    Medium 72 KB 10/28/2020 3:46 PM McCulley, Jennifer (NIH/NIDCD) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{97DA7928-CE8E-4512-A285-485353D6E8DD}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
1313396Cells keep time to know when to retire. Appears in the NIGMS booklet <a href="http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/insidethecell/" target="_blank"><i>Inside the Cell</i></a>.10/28/2020 7:49:32 PM10/28/2020 7:49:32 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified ITC_Clock_Copy_M    Medium 37 KB 10/28/2020 3:49 PM McCulley, Jennifer (NIH/NIDCD) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{70BFE1CD-4BA3-4A73-9846-5F9A5E3AC122}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
1316399A cell in interphase, at the start of mitosis: Chromosomes duplicate, and the copies remain attached to each other. Mitosis is responsible for growth and development, as well as for replacing injured or worn out cells throughout the body. For simplicity, mitosis is illustrated here with only six chromosomes. Appears in the NIGMS booklet <a href="http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/insidethecell/" target="_blank"><i>Inside the Cell</i></a>.10/28/2020 7:59:36 PM10/28/2020 7:59:36 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified ITC_Interphase_Copy_M    Medium 25 KB 10/28/2020 3:58 PM McCulley, Jennifer (NIH/NIDCD) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{CC26613E-B46F-4792-A466-D865908DABC2}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
1328400A cell in anaphase during mitosis: Chromosomes separate into two genetically identical groups and move to opposite ends of the spindle. Mitosis is responsible for growth and development, as well as for replacing injured or worn out cells throughout the body. For simplicity, mitosis is illustrated here with only six chromosomes. Appears in the NIGMS booklet <a href="http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/insidethecell/" target="_blank"><i>Inside the Cell</i></a>.10/28/2020 8:03:57 PM10/28/2020 8:03:57 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified ITC_Mito_ana_Copy_M    Medium 42 KB 10/28/2020 4:02 PM McCulley, Jennifer (NIH/NIDCD) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{82BCCF0D-B1FE-4EB0-A9EF-E369AFB43F37}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2757402The fly fatbody is a nutrient storage and mobilization organ akin to the mammalian liver. The engulfment receptor Draper (green) is located at the cell surface of fatbody cells. The cell nuclei are shown in blue.8/21/2020 7:22:13 PM8/21/2020 7:22:13 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Drpr-Stain-Fatbody_S    Low 15 KB 9/14/2016 11:23 AM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{82EDCB5C-6659-4D5D-BB11-115D5E51E39A}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2758403This photograph shows a magnified view of a <i>Drosophila melanogaster</i> pupa in cross section. Compare this normal pupa to one that lacks an important receptor, shown in image 2759.8/21/2020 7:26:54 PM8/21/2020 7:26:54 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Control_S    Low 16 KB 9/14/2016 11:26 AM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{790A2C6F-2A21-48D4-8215-1A3D8B97D2B6}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2759404In the absence of the engulfment receptor Draper, salivary gland cells (light blue) persist in the thorax of a developing <i>Drosophila melanogaster</i> pupa. See image 2758 for a cross section of a normal pupa that does express Draper.8/21/2020 7:28:19 PM8/21/2020 7:28:19 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified draper-mutant_S    Low 16 KB 9/14/2016 11:24 AM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{4A178706-B83E-481F-B939-8ACA0AB2C112}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2762405The nucleolinus is a cellular compartment that has been a lonely bystander in scientific endeavors. Although it's found in a range of species, its function has been mysterious--mainly because the structure is hard to visualize. An August 2010 study showed that the nucleolinus is crucial for cell division. When researchers zapped the structure with a laser, an egg cell didn't complete division. When the oocyte was fertilized after laser microsurgery (bottom right), the resulting zygote didn't form vital cell division structures (blue and yellow). Featured in the August 18, 2010 issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/10-08-18/index.html#1 target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.8/21/2020 7:32:46 PM8/21/2020 7:32:46 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified nucleolinus_L    Low 11 KB 6/3/2016 3:17 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C The nucleolinus is a cellular compartment that has been a STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{FD215BF3-E986-4BF4-9AE4-ADB46D9A1FCF}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2763406This fused chromosome has two functional centromeres, shown as two sets of red and green dots. Centromeres are DNA/protein complexes that are key to splitting the chromosomes evenly during cell division. When dicentric chromosomes like this one are formed in a person, fertility problems or other difficulties may arise. Normal chromosomes carrying a single centromere (one set of red and green dots) are also visible in this image.8/21/2020 7:35:28 PM8/21/2020 7:35:28 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2763_Fused__dicentric_S    Low 84 KB 3/29/2019 10:57 AM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{DA0A716B-91C8-44AF-B721-33891244BB23}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2764407Like a paint-by-numbers picture, painted probes tint individual human chromosomes by targeting specific DNA sequences. Chromosome 13 is colored green, chromosome 14 is in red and chromosome 15 is painted yellow. The image shows two examples of fused chromosomes--a pair of chromosomes 15 connected head-to-head (yellow dumbbell-shaped structure) and linked chromosomes 13 and 14 (green and red dumbbell). These fused chromosomes--called dicentric chromosomes--may cause fertility problems or other difficulties in people.8/28/2020 5:52:08 PM8/28/2020 5:52:08 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2764_Painted_S    Low 43 KB 3/29/2019 10:57 AM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{2F56AD82-78D5-4DAB-A17A-FE8643AE443F}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3738409Elastin is a fibrous protein in the extracellular matrix (ECM). It is abundant in artery walls like the one shown here. As its name indicates, elastin confers elasticity. Elastin fibers are at least five times stretchier than rubber bands of the same size. Tissues that expand, such as blood vessels and lungs, need to be both strong and elastic, so they contain both collagen (another ECM protein) and elastin. In this photo, the elastin-rich ECM is colored grayish brown and is most visible at the bottom of the photo. The curved red structures near the top of the image are red blood cells.12/17/2020 4:39:43 PM12/17/2020 4:39:43 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Coronary_artery_wall_M    Medium 199 KB 6/3/2016 3:40 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Best, Tom D. PS I would STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{41D3F9A9-B49C-4DE0-BB79-0D858A3AA798}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3739410This image shows the extracellular matrix (ECM) on the surface of a soleus (lower calf) muscle in light brown and blood vessels in pink. Near the bottom of the photo, a vessel is opened up to reveal red blood cells. Scientists know less about the ECM in muscle than in other tissues, but it's increasingly clear that the ECM is critical to muscle function, and disruption of the ECM has been associated with many muscle disorders. The ECM in muscles stores and releases growth factors, suggesting that it might play a role in cellular communication.12/17/2020 4:40:53 PM12/17/2020 4:40:53 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Soleus_muscle_M    Medium 322 KB 6/3/2016 3:40 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C The first 6 are: ?Courtesy Thomas STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{A672F8D7-6917-4ED0-8C4D-74E6AFE2A8BC}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3740411Nodes of Ranvier are short gaps in the myelin sheath surrounding myelinated nerve cells (axons). Myelin insulates axons, and the node of Ranvier is where the axon is exposed to the extracellular environment, allowing for the transmission of action potentials at these nodes via ion flows between the inside and outside of the axon. The image shows a cross-section through the node, with the surrounding ECM encasing and supporting the axon shown in cyan.12/17/2020 4:42:11 PM12/17/2020 4:42:11 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Node_of_Ranvier2_L    Low 94 KB 6/3/2016 3:40 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Nodes of Ranvier are short gaps in STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{8F452BFD-D560-46A0-B945-E3470BDBDD41}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3741412The photo shows a confocal microscopy image of perineuronal nets (PNNs), which are specialized extracellular matrix (ECM) structures in the brain. The PNN surrounds some nerve cells in brain regions including the cortex, hippocampus and thalamus. Researchers study the PNN to investigate their involvement stabilizing the extracellular environment and forming nets around nerve cells and synapses in the brain. Abnormalities in the PNNs have been linked to a variety of disorders, including epilepsy and schizophrenia, and they limit a process called neural plasticity in which new nerve connections are formed. To visualize the PNNs, researchers labeled them with Wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA)-fluorescein. Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3742">image 3742</a>.12/17/2020 5:33:10 PM12/17/2020 5:33:10 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Cortex_neuronal_ECM_M    Medium 92 KB 6/3/2016 3:40 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C TEM 5: Soleus muscle ECM on STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{49BF2F89-C3EB-46DB-A682-8EF8BF979760}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3742413The photo shows a confocal microscopy image of perineuronal nets (PNNs), which are specialized extracellular matrix (ECM) structures in the brain. The PNN surrounds some nerve cells in brain regions including the cortex, hippocampus and thalamus. Researchers study the PNN to investigate their involvement stabilizing the extracellular environment and forming nets around nerve cells and synapses in the brain. Abnormalities in the PNNs have been linked to a variety of disorders, including epilepsy and schizophrenia, and they limit a process called neural plasticity in which new nerve connections are formed. To visualize the PNNs, researchers labeled them with Wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA)-fluorescein. Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3741">image 3741</a>.12/17/2020 5:35:24 PM12/17/2020 5:35:24 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 3742_Cortex_neuronal_ECM_S    Low 128 KB 3/28/2019 4:01 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{FC6C3E72-F217-4DDB-A4D4-6C0B904EC50A}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3743414Flower development is a carefully orchestrated, genetically programmed process that ensures that the male (stamen) and female (pistil) organs form in the right place and at the right time in the flower. In this image of young Arabidopsis flower buds, the gene SUPERMAN (red) is activated at the boundary between the cells destined to form the male and female parts. SUPERMAN activity prevents the central cells, which will ultimately become the female pistil, from activating the gene APETALA3 (green), which induces formation of male flower organs. The goal of this research is to find out how plants maintain cells (called stem cells) that have the potential to develop into any type of cell and how genetic and environmental factors cause stem cells to develop and specialize into different cell types. This work informs future studies in agriculture, medicine and other fields.12/17/2020 5:36:24 PM12/17/2020 5:36:24 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified BioArt_2015_Prunet3_M    Medium 34 KB 6/3/2016 3:40 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C The image was taken by Dr STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{3CD2ADF5-9910-4D9D-8F2A-529DDAB12C83}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
1337417A humorous treatment of the concept of a cycling cell. Appears in the NIGMS booklet <a href="http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/insidethecell/" target="_blank"><i>Inside the Cell</i></a>.10/28/2020 8:31:27 PM10/28/2020 8:31:27 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified ITC_BicyclingCell_Copy_S    Low 56 KB 7/28/2016 4:00 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{0C346395-48A4-46CC-838A-C437166E6BE8}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
1338418Nerve cells have long, invisibly thin fibers that carry electrical impulses throughout the body. Some of these fibers extend about 3 feet from the spinal cord to the toes. Appears in the NIGMS booklet <a href="http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/insidethecell/" target="_blank"><i>Inside the Cell</i></a>.10/28/2020 8:33:07 PM10/28/2020 8:33:07 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified ITC_Neuron_lg_Copy_M    Medium 273 KB 6/3/2016 2:52 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{826D8129-3DA0-4655-B650-0B94F815520C}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
1339419The largest human cell (by volume) is the egg. Human eggs are 150 micrometers in diameter and you can just barely see one with a naked eye. In comparison, consider the eggs of chickens...or ostriches! Appears in the NIGMS booklet <a href="http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/insidethecell/" target="_blank"><i>Inside the Cell</i></a>.10/29/2020 12:07:34 PM10/29/2020 12:07:34 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified ITC_EggComp02_M    Medium 116 KB 10/29/2020 8:07 AM McCulley, Jennifer (NIH/NIDCD) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{D7E7FAF9-C908-4EF8-8A52-9B68E55C9939}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2307423The fledgling field of X-ray microscopy lets researchers look inside whole cells rapidly frozen to capture their actions at that very moment. Here, a yeast cell buds before dividing into two. Colors show different parts of the cell. Seeing whole cells frozen in time will help scientists observe cells' complex structures and follow how molecules move inside them. Featured in the June 21, 2005, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/05-06-21/#1 target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.10/29/2020 12:52:06 PM10/29/2020 12:52:06 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified cells_frozen_in_time_L    Low 4 KB 6/3/2016 3:08 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Here, a yeast cell buds before STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{71D94C18-4C1B-4E16-B859-AACCFD847EC4}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2308424Like a major city, a cell teems with specialized workers that carry out its daily operations--making energy, moving proteins, or helping with other tasks. Researchers took microscopic pictures of thin layers of a cell and then combined them to make this 3-D image featuring color-coded organelles--the cell's "workers." Using this image, scientists can understand how these specialized components fit together in the cell's packed inner world. Featured in the August 15, 2006, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/06-08-15/#1 target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.10/29/2020 12:51:22 PM10/29/2020 12:51:22 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2308_cellular_metropolis_S    Low 233 KB 3/29/2019 1:55 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{56C669A2-4B14-42B3-A485-A67D65E981C7}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2798431Speckle microscopy analysis of actin cytoskeleton force. This is an example of NIH-supported research on single-cell analysis. Images in related series; Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=2799">image 2799</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=2800">image 2800</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=2801">image 2801</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=2802">image 2802</a> and <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=2803">image 2803</a>.9/11/2020 3:17:28 PM9/11/2020 3:17:28 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified nih11ActinFlow_M    Medium 104 KB 7/28/2016 3:55 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{8409D24B-C1D1-4C42-AFE5-25E5329B699F}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2799432Force vectors computed from actin cytoskeleton flow. This is an example of NIH-supported research on single cell analysis. Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=2798">image 2798</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=2800">image 2800</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=2801">image 2801</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=2802">image 2802</a> and <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=2803">image 2803</a>.9/11/2020 4:23:33 PM9/11/2020 4:23:33 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified nih11IntracellularForces_S    Low 92 KB 8/24/2016 3:41 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{3D55FE55-96A4-40D3-8C11-D9AADE15FC17}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3765437Trypanosoma brucei is a single-cell parasite that causes sleeping sickness in humans. Scientists have been studying trypanosomes for some time because of their negative effects on human and also animal health, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. Moreover, because these organisms evolved on a separate path from those of animals and plants more than a billion years ago, researchers study trypanosomes to find out what traits they may harbor that are common to or different from those of other eukaryotes (i.e., those organisms having a nucleus and mitochondria). This image shows the T. brucei cell membrane in red, the DNA in the nucleus and kinetoplast (a structure unique to protozoans, including trypanosomes, which contains mitochondrial DNA) in blue and nuclear pore complexes (which allow molecules to pass into or out of the nucleus) in green. Scientists have found that the trypanosome nuclear pore complex has a unique mechanism by which it attaches to the nuclear envelope. In addition, the trypanosome nuclear pore complex differs from those of other eukaryotes because its components have a near-complete symmetry, and it lacks almost all of the proteins that in other eukaryotes studied so far are required to assemble the pore. To learn more why researchers study the nuclear pore complex in trypanosomes, see this <a href="http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2016/03/17/parasites-reveal-how-evolution-has-molded-an-ancient-nuclear-structure/">press release by Rockefeller University</a>.12/17/2020 6:35:35 PM12/17/2020 6:35:35 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Tryps_NPC4_M    Medium 16 KB 12/17/2020 1:36 PM Walter, Taylor (NIH/NIGMS) [C This image shows the T. brucei STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{4B64FB03-DDD1-4D8B-AADD-14F5B151DFD8}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3771439Viruses have been the foes of animals and other organisms for time immemorial. For almost as long, they've stayed well hidden from view because they are so tiny (they aren't even cells, so scientists call the individual virus a "particle"). This image shows a molecular model of a particle of the Rous sarcoma virus, a virus that infects and sometimes causes cancer in chickens. In the background is a photo of red blood cells. The particle shown is "immature" (not yet capable of infecting new cells) because it has just budded from an infected chicken cell and entered the bird's bloodstream. The outer shell of the immature virus is made up of a regular assembly of large proteins (shown in red) that are linked together with short protein molecules called peptides (green). This outer shell covers and protects the proteins (blue) that form the inner shell of the particle. But as you can see, the protective armor of the immature virus contains gaping holes. As the particle matures, the short peptides are removed and the large proteins rearrange, fusing together into a solid sphere capable of infecting new cells. While still immature, the particle is vulnerable to drugs that block its development. Knowing the structure of the immature particle may help scientists develop better medications against RSV and similar viruses in humans. Scientists used sophisticated computational tools to reconstruct the RSV atomic structure by crunching various data on the RSV proteins to simulate the entire structure of immature RSV. For more on RSV and how researchers revealed its delicate structure, see the NIH director's blog post <a href="https://directorsblog.nih.gov/2016/04/14/snapshots-of-life-imperfect-but-beautiful-intruder/">Snapshots of Life: Imperfect but Beautiful Intruder.</a>12/17/2020 6:39:16 PM12/17/2020 6:39:16 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Imperfect_intruder_for_NIH_L1    Low 104 KB 6/3/2016 3:41 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{A147967A-CD83-453D-8FF9-DC930253A9F5}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3772440Our cells are constantly removing and recycling molecular waste. This video shows one way cells process their trash.12/17/2020 6:40:12 PM12/17/2020 6:40:12 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 3772_Proteasome-Cell-Trash-Processor_T    Thumbnail 60 KB 3/28/2019 3:59 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{EBD73800-5BE3-4C3E-AB2A-5D84A8D932ED}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2323446Amid a network of blood vessels and star-shaped support cells, neurons in the brain signal each other. The mists of color show the flow of important molecules like glucose and oxygen. This image is a snapshot from a 52-second simulation created by an animation artist. Such visualizations make biological processes more accessible and easier to understand. Featured in the February 20, 2007, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/07-02-20/#1 target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>. The full animation is featured in <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/computinglife/ target="_blank"><em>Computing Life</em></a>.10/29/2020 1:57:07 PM10/29/2020 1:57:07 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Motionbrain_L    Low 75 KB 6/3/2016 3:08 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Featured in the February 20, 2007, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/07-02-20/#1 STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{2C8FCCED-02F5-4AF6-A718-17B3C31F535C}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2324447Inside the fertilized egg cell of a fruit fly, we see a type of myosin, related to the protein that helps muscles contract, made to glow by attaching a fluorescent protein. After fertilization, the myosin proteins are distributed relatively evenly near the surface of the embryo. The proteins temporarily vanish each time the cell's nuclei--initially buried deep in the cytoplasm--divide. When the multiplying nuclei move to the surface, they shift the myosin, producing darkened holes. The glowing myosin proteins then gather, contract, and start separating the nuclei into their own compartments. This image and a video are featured in the February 22, 2005, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/05-02-22/#1 target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.10/29/2020 1:59:52 PM10/29/2020 1:59:52 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Myosin_M    Medium 34 KB 6/3/2016 3:08 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C When the multiplying nuclei move to the surface, they shift the STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{D0B60815-4572-45A7-8DC4-F158A73070F8}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3251449Neurons (green) and glial cells from isolated dorsal root ganglia express COX-2 (red) after exposure to an inflammatory stimulus (cell nuclei are blue). Lawrence Marnett and colleagues have demonstrated that certain drugs selectively block COX-2 metabolism of endocannabinoids -- naturally occurring analgesic molecules -- in stimulated dorsal root ganglia. Featured in the October 20, 2011 issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/11-10-20/index.html#1><i>Biomedical Beat</i></a>.12/22/2020 4:34:36 PM12/22/2020 4:34:36 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified marnett_drg_cox2_S    Low 52 KB 9/14/2016 11:28 AM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{C8982B6C-1BAB-4C7F-BDB5-00ECC4E4D63D}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3252450Green and yellow fluorescence mark the processes and cell bodies of some <i>C. elegans</i> neurons. Researchers have found that the strategies used by this tiny roundworm to control its motions are remarkably similar to those used by the human brain to command movement of our body parts. From a November 2011 University of Michigan <a href=http://www.ns.umich.edu/new/releases/20051-tiny-worms-change-direction-using-two-human-like-neural-circuits target="_blank">news release</a>.12/22/2020 4:35:10 PM12/22/2020 4:35:10 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Round_worm_L    Low 33 KB 6/3/2016 3:25 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Green and yellow fluorescence mark the STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{7A2F35B4-8E5E-4118-98BE-7AE80AC58462}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3253451By attaching fluorescent proteins to the genetic circuit responsible for <i>B. subtilis's</i> stress response, researchers can observe the cells' pulses as green flashes. In response to a stressful environment like one lacking food, <i>B. subtilis</i> activates a large set of genes that help it respond to the hardship. Instead of leaving those genes on as previously thought, researchers discovered that the bacteria flip the genes on and off, increasing the frequency of these pulses with increasing stress. From a November 2011 Caltech <a href=http://media.caltech.edu/press_releases/13470 target="_blank">news release</a>. See entry 3254 for the related video.12/22/2020 4:51:02 PM12/22/2020 4:51:02 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified MarcusImage2_S    Low 8 KB 9/8/2016 3:50 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C From a November 2011 Caltech <a STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{089CF209-3684-40DE-B4E9-CD5F859481D8}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3254452By attaching fluorescent proteins to the genetic circuit responsible for <i>B. subtilis's</i> stress response, researchers can observe the cells' pulses as green flashes. This video shows flashing cells as they multiply over the course of more than 12 hours. In response to a stressful environment like one lacking food, <i>B. subtilis</i> activates a large set of genes that help it respond to the hardship. Instead of leaving those genes on as previously thought, researchers discovered that the bacteria flip the genes on and off, increasing the frequency of these pulses with increasing stress. From a November 2011 Caltech <a href=http://media.caltech.edu/press_releases/13470 target="_blank">news release</a>. See entry 3253 for a related still image.12/22/2020 4:55:52 PM12/22/2020 4:55:52 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 3254_video_thumbnail    Thumbnail 36 KB 6/3/2016 3:25 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{D26400AC-F7A2-4B7A-A56C-6E4293405427}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3262454A study using <i>Caulobacter crescentus</i> showed that some bacteria use just-in-time processing, much like that used in industrial delivery, to make the glue that allows them to attach to surfaces, an important step in the infection process for many disease-causing bacteria. In the image shown, this freshwater bacterium has a holdfast at the top and a propelling flagellum at the end. From an Indiana University <a href=http://newsinfo.iu.edu/news/page/normal/20470.html?emailID=20470 target="_blank">news release</a>.12/22/2020 5:03:23 PM12/22/2020 5:03:23 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified _S    Low 7 KB 9/8/2016 3:10 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C _M    Medium 16 KB 9/8/2016 3:10 PM STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{A9D454C1-82B1-4077-8A3E-493467592B0A}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3263455Peripheral nerve cells made from human embryonic stem cell-derived neural crest stem cells. The nuclei are shown in blue, and nerve cell proteins peripherin and beta-tubulin (Tuj1) are shown in green and red, respectively. See also entry 3264. Image is featured in October 2015 Biomedical Beat blog post <a href="http://biobeat.nigms.nih.gov/2015/10/cool-images-a-halloween-inspired-cell-collection/" target="_">Cool Images: A Halloween-Inspired Cell Collection</a>.12/22/2020 5:07:13 PM12/22/2020 5:07:13 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Dalton_1_rs_thumbnail_rs    Thumbnail 19 KB 3/22/2021 6:17 PM Walter, Taylor (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{6AD9CBAC-17F7-45F8-A5EB-622E2C716DD2}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
1091457Glial cells (stained green) in a fruit fly developing embryo have survived thanks to a signaling pathway initiated by neighboring nerve cells (stained red).8/27/2020 8:56:25 PM8/27/2020 8:56:25 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified NIH_picHR_S    Low 54 KB 8/25/2016 5:29 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{AB4185D1-7391-479E-AAB7-054DDB7179F7}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
1092458A whole yeast (<i>Saccharomyces cerevisiae</i>) cell viewed by X-ray microscopy. Inside, the nucleus and a large vacuole (red) are visible.8/27/2020 9:02:59 PM8/27/2020 9:02:59 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Larabell_yeast1_M    Medium 64 KB 6/3/2016 2:45 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{235B7768-263F-4DC4-A8FB-DA3A0F629CAD}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
1101459This image of human red blood cells was obtained with the help of a scanning electron microscope, an instrument that uses a finely focused electron beam to yield detailed images of the surface of a sample.8/27/2020 9:05:59 PM8/27/2020 9:05:59 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified RBC.B_W.Carvallo_M    Medium 47 KB 1/28/2021 8:02 AM McCulley, Jennifer (NIH/NIDCD) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{F3C64B84-EF6C-4B97-A2A1-0C56130FFA52}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
1102460This image shows two components of the cytoskeleton, microtubules (green) and actin filaments (red), in an endothelial cell derived from a cow lung. The cystoskeleton provides the cell with an inner framework and enables it to move and change shape.8/27/2020 9:07:48 PM8/27/2020 9:07:48 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified prettycellb_M    Medium 26 KB 1/28/2021 8:06 AM McCulley, Jennifer (NIH/NIDCD) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{FB4E12C9-A3D5-4790-ACFD-0086EA78117C}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
1157462Image of <i>Streptococcus</i>, a type (genus) of spherical bacteria that can colonize the throat and back of the mouth. Stroptococci often occur in pairs or in chains, as shown here.8/27/2020 9:15:54 PM8/27/2020 9:15:54 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 1157_strept1color__S    Low 154 KB 3/29/2019 2:02 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{229D3635-54DB-44A1-B714-B5BF987E6975}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
1158463A colorized scanning electron micrograph of bacteria. Scanning electron microscopes allow scientists to see the three-dimensional surface of their samples. Appears in the NIGMS booklet <a href="http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/insidethecell/" target="_blank"><i>Inside the Cell</i></a>.8/27/2020 9:20:44 PM8/27/2020 9:20:44 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 7-ccmix8acolor_M    Medium 75 KB 1/28/2021 8:08 AM McCulley, Jennifer (NIH/NIDCD) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{B6A343DC-8C2C-48DD-BC3A-F4E2D2387714}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2635464A computer model shows how the endoplasmic reticulum is close to and almost wraps around mitochondria in the cell. The endoplasmic reticulum is lime green and the mitochondria are yellow. This image relates to a July 27, 2009, <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/computinglife/cells_circuits.htm target="_blank">article in <em>Computing Life</em></a>.11/6/2020 9:05:38 PM11/6/2020 9:05:38 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2635_MitochondriaER_S    Low 39 KB 3/29/2019 11:06 AM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{D8A0E95C-0812-4C5C-B75C-0C20F648C0EB}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2636465A computer model of the cell membrane, where the plasma membrane is red, endoplasmic reticulum is yellow, and mitochondria are blue. This image relates to a July 27, 2009, <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/computinglife/cells_circuits.htm target="_blank">article in <em>Computing Life</em></a>.11/6/2020 9:06:39 PM11/6/2020 9:06:39 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified PMerMito_L    Low 7 KB 6/3/2016 3:14 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C This image relates to a July 27, 2009 STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{AD496F84-A1DA-4936-88C0-35CE99BE9475}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2637466A scanning electron microscope image of an activated mast cell. This image illustrates the interesting topography of the cell membrane, which is populated with receptors. The distribution of receptors may affect cell signaling. This image relates to a July 27, 2009, <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/computinglife/cells_circuits.htm target="_blank">article in <em>Computing Life</em></a>.11/6/2020 9:07:57 PM11/6/2020 9:07:57 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2637_rblactiveshad_S    Low 85 KB 3/29/2019 11:05 AM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{421A90EE-2D34-4873-9436-3DCFB980CD0D}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2649467Fluorescent markers show the interconnected web of tubes and compartments in the endoplasmic reticulum. The protein atlastin helps build and maintain this critical part of cells. The image is from a July 2009 <a href=http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2009-07/ru-lpf072909.php target="_blank">news release</a>.11/6/2020 9:09:17 PM11/6/2020 9:09:17 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2649_endoplasmic_S    Low 166 KB 3/29/2019 11:04 AM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{20BB4B63-1487-4B55-B7AB-04CA407D26CC}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2667468Professor Marc Zimmer's family pets, including these fish, glow in the dark in response to blue light. Featured in the September 2009 issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/findings/index.htm target="_blank"><i>Findings</i></a>.11/6/2020 9:11:31 PM11/6/2020 9:11:31 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2667_glowing_S    Low 32 KB 3/29/2019 11:03 AM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{16399043-CE98-49AE-B1BC-49009124078B}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2683469Fruit fly sperm cells glow bright green when they express the gene for green fluorescent protein (GFP).11/6/2020 9:13:03 PM11/6/2020 9:13:03 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified GFP_sperm_S    Low 35 KB 9/7/2016 2:45 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{E876C40F-9568-4740-8322-68831D3B5608}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2684470<i>Dictyostelium discoideum</i> is a microscopic amoeba. A group of 100,000 form a mound as big as a grain of sand. Featured in <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/thenewgenetics/ target="_blank"><i>The New Genetics</i></a>.11/6/2020 9:14:47 PM11/6/2020 9:14:47 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified dicty_fruit_M    Medium 83 KB 7/28/2016 3:53 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{65791521-16B6-4696-B5EA-EAC060CF88F8}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3637472This image captures Purkinje cells (red), one of the main types of nerve cell found in the brain. These cells have elaborate branching structures called dendrites that receive signals from other nerve cells. This image is part of the Life: Magnified collection, which was displayed in the Gateway Gallery at Washington Dulles International Airport June 3, 2014, to January 21, 2015. To see all 46 images in this exhibit, go to https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/life-magnified/Pages/default.aspx.11/24/2020 8:54:58 PM11/24/2020 8:54:58 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 10_4_Purkinje_Cells_Ma-Vartanian    High 4207 KB 11/24/2020 3:55 PM Walter, Taylor (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{B327DA06-E207-497F-82E1-0F14A024E32D}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3638473This human T cell (blue) is under attack by HIV (yellow), the virus that causes AIDS. The virus specifically targets T cells, which play a critical role in the body's immune response against invaders like bacteria and viruses. This image is part of the Life: Magnified collection, which was displayed in the Gateway Gallery at Washington Dulles International Airport June 3, 2014, to January 21, 2015. To see all 46 images in this exhibit, go to https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/life-magnified/Pages/default.aspx.11/24/2020 8:57:35 PM11/24/2020 8:57:35 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 11B_4_HIV_2_L    Low 268 KB 6/3/2016 3:36 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C This human T cell (blue) is under attack by HIV (yellow), the STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{07054FB9-4248-421C-84F3-7D484974C8D2}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131