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6886334Neutrophil-like cells (blue) in a microfluidic chip preferentially migrating toward LTB4 over fMLP. A neutrophil is a type of white blood cell that is part of the immune system and helps the body fight infection. Both LTB4 and fMLP are molecules involved in immune response. Microfluidic chips are small devices containing microscopic channels, and they are used in a range of applications, from basic research on cells to pathogen detection. The scale bar in this video is 500μm.4/1/2022 8:13:40 PM4/1/2022 8:13:40 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified CellMigration    High 3903 KB 4/4/2022 10:32 AM Bigler, Abbey (NIH/NIGMS) [C The scale bar in this video is 500μm STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{2FB4E3AD-9AC0-4E23-9872-B4D8B3D37E23}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6887336The nucleus of a human fibroblast cell with chromatin—a substance made up of DNA and proteins—shown in various colors. Fibroblasts are one of the most common types of cells in mammalian connective tissue, and they play a key role in wound healing and tissue repair. This image was captured using Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy (STORM). <Br><Br> Related to images <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6888">6888</a> and <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6893">6893</a>.4/4/2022 3:59:29 PM4/4/2022 3:59:29 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Fibroblast2_S    Low 23 KB 4/4/2022 10:51 AM Bigler, Abbey (NIH/NIGMS) [C Let me know if this is good or if STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{635C6863-170A-4012-9511-EDA350373D39}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6888337The nucleus of a human fibroblast cell with chromatin—a substance made up of DNA and proteins—shown in various colors. Fibroblasts are one of the most common types of cells in mammalian connective tissue, and they play a key role in wound healing and tissue repair. This image was captured using Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy (STORM). <Br><Br> Related to images <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6887">6887</a> and <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6893">6893</a>.4/4/2022 4:01:50 PM4/4/2022 4:01:50 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Fibroblast3_S    Low 29 KB 4/4/2022 10:53 AM Bigler, Abbey (NIH/NIGMS) [C Let me know if this is good or if STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{21729FE7-37AA-4EB9-8FF7-6E581E4EE48D}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6889338Lysosomes (yellow) and detyrosinated microtubules (light blue). Lysosomes are bubblelike organelles that take in molecules and use enzymes to break them down. Microtubules are strong, hollow fibers that provide structural support to cells. The researchers who took this image found that in epithelial cells, detyrosinated microtubules are a small subset of fibers, and they concentrate lysosomes around themselves. This image was captured using Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy (STORM). <Br><Br> Related to images <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6890">6890</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6891">6891</a>, and <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6892">6892</a>.4/4/2022 4:06:18 PM4/4/2022 4:06:18 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Lysosomes_S    Low 32 KB 4/1/2022 4:38 PM Bigler, Abbey (NIH/NIGMS) [C Let me know if this is good or if you STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{61D1D731-2E41-4381-B686-1D02186676AD}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6791343 Yeast cells entering mitosis, also known as cell division. The green and magenta dots are two proteins that play important roles in mitosis. They show where the cells will split. This image was captured using wide-field microscopy with deconvolution. <Br><Br> Related to images <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6792">6792</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6793">6793</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6794">6794</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6797">6797</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6798">6798</a>, and videos <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6795">6795</a> and <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6796">6796</a>. 1/21/2022 4:01:28 PM1/21/2022 4:01:28 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified YeastCells1_M    Low 20 KB 1/28/2022 2:29 PM Dolan, Lauren (NIH/NIGMS) [C Alt text: Oblong yeast cells with STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{00AC02CC-5419-4229-A038-7F308934F397}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6891344Microtubules in African green monkey cells. Microtubules are strong, hollow fibers that provide cells with structural support. Here, the microtubules have been color-coded based on their distance from the microscope lens: purple is closest to the lens, and yellow is farthest away. This image was captured using Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy (STORM). <Br><Br> Related to images <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6889">6889</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6890">6890</a>, and <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6892">6892</a>. 4/4/2022 4:10:02 PM4/4/2022 4:10:02 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified MicrotubulesinMonkeyCells_M    Medium 240 KB 4/4/2022 10:39 AM Bigler, Abbey (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{1F39E3DF-F3C9-48A9-9597-492A967EA195}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6799345A sensor particle being engulfed by a macrophage—an immune cell—and encapsuled in a compartment called a phagosome. The phagosome then fuses with lysosomes—another type of compartment. The left video shows snowman-shaped sensor particles with fluorescent green nanoparticle “heads” and “bodies” colored red by Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET)-donor fluorophores. The middle video visualizes light blue FRET signals that are only generated when the “snowman” sensor—the FRET-donor—fuses with the lysosomes, which are loaded with FRET-acceptors. The right video combines the other two. The videos were captured using epi-fluorescence microscopy. <Br><Br> More details can be found in the paper <a href="https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2021.04.04.438376v1">“Transport motility of phagosomes on actin and microtubules regulates timing and kinetics of their maturation” </a> by Yu et al. 1/21/2022 3:58:41 PM1/21/2022 3:58:41 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Phagosome-H    High 1458 KB 1/21/2022 2:41 PM Dolan, Lauren (NIH/NIGMS) [C The right video combines the other STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{FBED8868-316B-4C74-A5D3-D7FF87A8A80D}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6792347Yeast cells with nuclei shown in green and contractile rings shown in magenta. Nuclei store DNA, and contractile rings help cells divide. This image was captured using wide-field microscopy with deconvolution. <Br><Br> Related to images <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6791">6791</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6793">6793</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6794">6794</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6797">6797</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6798">6798</a>, and videos <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6795">6795</a> and <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6796">6796</a>.1/21/2022 4:01:07 PM1/21/2022 4:01:07 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified YeastCells2_S    Low 36 KB 3/8/2022 9:46 AM Bigler, Abbey (NIH/NIGMS) [C Alt text: Oblong yeast cells with STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{4CDD6F72-1D2A-4826-9E70-6D72E3853433}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6800360A Janus particle being used to activate a T cell, a type of immune cell. A Janus particle is a specialized nanoparticle with different physical properties on its surface, and this one is coated with nickel on one hemisphere and anti-CD3 antibodies (light blue) on the other. The nickel enables the Janus particle to be moved using a magnet, and the antibodies bind to the T cell and activate it. The T cell in this video was loaded with calcium-sensitive dye to visualize calcium influx, which indicates activation. The intensity of calcium influx was color coded so that warmer color indicates higher intensity. Being able to control Janus particles with simple magnets is a step toward controlling individual cells’ activities without complex magnetic devices.<Br><Br> More details can be found in the <em> Angewandte Chemie </em> paper <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/anie.201601211">“Remote control of T cell activation using magnetic Janus particles”</a> by Lee et al. This video was captured using epi-fluorescence microscopy. <Br><Br>Related to video <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6801">6801</a>. 1/21/2022 3:57:57 PM1/21/2022 3:57:57 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Magnetic particle switch for T cell activation-H    High 25441 KB 1/21/2022 2:46 PM Dolan, Lauren (NIH/NIGMS STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{21EB1F1F-CCAE-4507-991B-8813F29A78C3}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6801362A macrophage—a type of immune cell that engulfs invaders—“eats” and is activated by a “two-faced” Janus particle. The particle is called “two-faced” because each of its two hemispheres is coated with a different type of molecule, shown here in red and cyan. During macrophage activation, a transcription factor tagged with a green fluorescence protein (NF-κB) gradually moves from the cell’s cytoplasm into its nucleus and causes DNA transcription. The distribution of molecules on “two-faced” Janus particles can be altered to control the activation of immune cells. Details on this “geometric manipulation” strategy can be found in the <em> Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences</em> paper <a href="https://www.pnas.org/content/116/50/25106.long">"Geometrical reorganization of Dectin-1 and TLR2 on single phagosomes alters their synergistic immune signaling" </a> by Li et al. and the <em> Scientific Reports</em> paper<a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-021-92910-9"> "Spatial organization of FcγR and TLR2/1 on phagosome membranes differentially regulates their synergistic and inhibitory receptor crosstalk"</a> by Li et al. This video was captured using epi-fluorescence microscopy. <Br><Br>Related to video <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6800">6800</a>.1/21/2022 3:57:23 PM1/21/2022 3:57:23 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Macrophage activation-H    High 20221 KB 1/21/2022 2:50 PM Dolan, Lauren (NIH/NIGMS) [C Here is the link to a STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{31BAA0E0-226C-4A0C-84A7-8C772C0B3749}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6803367Groups of <em>Staphylococcus aureus</em> bacteria (blue) attached to a microstructured titanium surface (green) that mimics an orthopedic implant used in joint replacement. The attachment of pre-formed groups of bacteria may lead to infections because the groups can tolerate antibiotics and evade the immune system. This image was captured using a scanning electron microscope. <Br><Br>More information on the research that produced this image can be found in the <em>Antibiotics</em> paper<a href="https://www.mdpi.com/2079-6382/10/8/889"> "Free-floating aggregate and single-cell-initiated biofilms of <em>Staphylococcus aureus</em>" </a>by Gupta et al. <Br><Br> Related to image <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6804">6804</a> and video <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6805">6805</a>. 1/21/2022 3:56:24 PM1/21/2022 3:56:24 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified SF Aggregates on patterned surfaces-blue_green_S    Low 14 KB 1/20/2022 1:49 PM Crowley, Rachel (NIH/NIGMS STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{E37D8CD5-D785-4772-AC02-AD968EA3AABF}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6890375Microtubules (magenta) in neurons of the hippocampus, a part of the brain involved in learning and memory. Microtubules are strong, hollow fibers that provide structural support to cells. This image was captured using Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy (STORM). <Br><Br> Related to images <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6889">6889</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6891">6891</a>, and <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6892">6892</a>.4/4/2022 4:07:17 PM4/4/2022 4:07:17 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Microtubules_S    Low 27 KB 4/4/2022 10:57 AM Bigler, Abbey (NIH/NIGMS) [C Let me know if this is good or if STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{669EF01C-7579-40A0-B4AD-BB86AF96AA93}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6804396<em>Staphylococcus aureus</em> bacteria (blue) on the porous coating of a femoral hip stem used in hip replacement surgery. The relatively rough surface of an implant is a favorable environment for bacteria to attach and grow. This can lead to the development of biofilms, which can cause infections. The researchers who took this image are working to understand where biofilms are likely to develop. This knowledge could support the prevention and treatment of infections. A scanning electron microscope was used to capture this image. <Br><Br>More information on the research that produced this image can be found in the <em>Antibiotics</em> paper<a href="https://www.mdpi.com/2079-6382/10/8/889"> "Free-floating aggregate and single-cell-initiated biofilms of <em>Staphylococcus aureus</em>" </a>by Gupta et al. <Br><Br>Related to image <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6803">6803</a> and video <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6805">6805</a>.1/21/2022 8:37:24 PM1/21/2022 8:37:24 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified S. aureus in the porous coating of a femoral stem_S    Low 18 KB 1/20/2022 1:51 PM Crowley, Rachel (NIH STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{F8EB39E7-349E-48B6-A64F-0CDEEC68BEB6}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6805397<em>Staphylococcus aureus</em> bacteria (green) grouping together upon contact with synovial fluid—a viscous substance found in joints. The formation of groups can help protect the bacteria from immune system defenses and from antibiotics, increasing the likelihood of an infection. This video is a 1-hour time lapse and was captured using a confocal laser scanning microscope. <Br><Br> More information about the research that produced this video can be found in the <em>Microbiology Spectrum</em> paper <a href="https://journals.asm.org/doi/full/10.1128/Spectrum.00267-21">“Synovial fluid-induced aggregation occurs across <em>Staphylococcus aureus</em> clinical isolates and is mechanistically independent of attached biofilm formation”</a> by Staats et al. <Br><Br> Related to images <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6803">6803</a> and <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6804">6804</a>. 1/21/2022 3:55:24 PM1/21/2022 3:55:24 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Staats staph aureus aggregates movie-H    High 24847 KB 1/21/2022 2:58 PM Dolan, Lauren (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{61CD18EB-4854-45A7-9B35-B685982060F1}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6892410Microtubules (magenta) and tau protein (light blue) in a cell model of tauopathy. Researchers believe that tauopathy—the aggregation of tau protein—plays a role in Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative diseases. This image was captured using Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy (STORM). <Br><Br> Related to images <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6889">6889</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6890">6890</a>, and <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6891">6891</a>.4/4/2022 4:09:01 PM4/4/2022 4:09:01 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified MicrotubulesandTau_S    Low 27 KB 4/4/2022 10:58 AM Bigler, Abbey (NIH/NIGMS) [C Let me know if this is good STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{DE00583D-B9CB-4665-84E3-2261F1F17414}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6893412The nucleus of a degenerating human tendon cell, also known as a tenocyte. It has been color-coded based on the density of chromatin—a substance made up of DNA and proteins. Areas of low chromatin density are shown in blue, and areas of high chromatin density are shown in red. This image was captured using Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy (STORM). <Br><Br> Related to images <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6887">6887</a> and <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6888">6888</a>.4/4/2022 4:03:38 PM4/4/2022 4:03:38 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Tenocyte_S    Low 18 KB 4/4/2022 11:00 AM Bigler, Abbey (NIH/NIGMS) [C Let me know if this is good or if you STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{5D92D72C-7BD8-40CF-9C24-97829634C429}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6809449Two fruit fly (<em>Drosophila melanogaster</em>) egg cells, one on each side of the central black line. The colorful swirls show the circular movement of cytoplasm—called ooplasmic streaming—that occurs in late egg cell development in wild-type (right) and mutant (left) oocytes. This image was captured using confocal microscopy. <Br><Br> More information on the research that produced this image can be found in the <em>Journal of Cell Biology</em> paper <a href="https://rupress.org/jcb/article/217/10/3497/120275/Ooplasmic-flow-cooperates-with-transport-and">“Ooplasmic flow cooperates with transport and anchorage in <em>Drosophila</em> oocyte posterior determination”</a> by Lu et al. 1/21/2022 3:52:59 PM1/21/2022 3:52:59 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Drosophila ooplasmic streaming_T    Thumbnail 2 KB 2/11/2022 1:41 PM Crowley, Rachel (NIH/NIGMS) [E STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{4D253170-106E-4EDF-AE42-322E3351BAE7}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6811473A fruit fly (<em>Drosophila melanogaster</em>) egg chamber with microtubules shown in green and actin filaments shown in red. Egg chambers are multicellular structures in fruit flies ovaries that each give rise to a single egg. Microtubules and actin filaments give the chambers structure and shape. This image was captured using a confocal microscope. <Br><Br> More information on the research that produced this image can be found in the <em> Current Biology</em> paper <a href="https://www.cell.com/current-biology/fulltext/S0960-9822(21)00669-2?_returnURL=https%3A%2F%2Flinkinghub.elsevier.com%2Fretrieve%2Fpii%2FS0960982221006692%3Fshowall%3Dtrue">"Gatekeeper function for Short stop at the ring canals of the <em>Drosophila</em> ovary"</a> by Lu et al.2/18/2022 6:32:46 PM2/18/2022 6:32:46 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 6811_S    Low 12 KB 2/11/2022 2:24 PM Crowley, Rachel (NIH/NIGMS) [E Vladimir I. Gelfand, Feinberg School of Medicine STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{A854D3BF-9D10-4F4C-858F-D399C6B8FFFD}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6810477Three fruit fly (<em>Drosophila melanogaster</em>) ovarioles (yellow, blue, and magenta) with egg cells visible inside them. Ovarioles are tubes in the reproductive systems of female insects. Egg cells form at one end of an ovariole and complete their development as they reach the other end, as shown in the yellow wild-type ovariole. This process requires an important protein that is missing in the blue and magenta ovarioles. This image was created using confocal microscopy. <Br><Br> More information on the research that produced this image can be found in the <em> Current Biology</em> paper <a href="https://www.cell.com/current-biology/fulltext/S0960-9822(21)00669-2?_returnURL=https%3A%2F%2Flinkinghub.elsevier.com%2Fretrieve%2Fpii%2FS0960982221006692%3Fshowall%3Dtrue">“Gatekeeper function for Short stop at the ring canals of the <em>Drosophila</em> ovary”</a> by Lu et al. 1/21/2022 3:51:54 PM1/21/2022 3:51:54 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Fruit fly ovarioles_6810_M    Medium 290 KB 2/11/2022 2:16 PM Dolan, Lauren (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{C9C95BC4-65E6-4B68-BC4A-814E3F8B69D5}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6806487The two large, central, round shapes are ovaries from a typical fruit fly (<em>Drosophila melanogaster</em>). The small butterfly-like structures surrounding them are fruit fly ovaries where researchers suppressed the expression of a gene that controls microtubule polymerization and is necessary for normal development. This image was captured using a confocal laser scanning microscope. <Br><Br> Related to image <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6807">6807</a>. 1/21/2022 3:55:03 PM1/21/2022 3:55:03 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Wild-type and mutant fruit fly ovaries_M    Medium 119 KB 2/11/2022 1:44 PM Dolan, Lauren (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{1CE96574-AF64-43B2-8987-EDADC4899FE7}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6793520Yeast cells with endocytic actin patches (green). These patches help cells take in outside material. When a cell is in interphase, patches concentrate at its ends. During later stages of cell division, patches move to where the cell splits. This image was captured using wide-field microscopy with deconvolution. <Br><Br> Related to images <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6791">6791</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6792">6792</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6794">6794</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6797">6797</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6798">6798</a>, and videos <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6795">6795</a> and <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6796">6796</a>.1/21/2022 4:00:52 PM1/21/2022 4:00:52 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified YeastCells3_S    Low 31 KB 3/8/2022 9:40 AM Bigler, Abbey (NIH/NIGMS) [C Alt text: Oblong yeast cells with STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{FE90C7AE-D565-46B1-AF2C-12983CE4DDBE}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6794522Yeast cells with the protein Fimbrin Fim1 shown in magenta. This protein plays a role in cell division. This image was captured using wide-field microscopy with deconvolution. <Br><Br> Related to images <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6791">6791</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6792">6792</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6793">6793</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6797">6797</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6798">6798</a>, and videos <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6795">6795</a> and <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6796">6796</a>.1/21/2022 4:00:34 PM1/21/2022 4:00:34 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified YeastCells4_S    Low 28 KB 3/8/2022 9:42 AM Bigler, Abbey (NIH/NIGMS) [C Alt text: Oblong cells with magenta STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{7ECCEC6D-EA0F-4636-8B50-14A655480FED}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6795523Time-lapse video of yeast cells undergoing cell division. Nuclear envelopes are shown in green, and spindle pole bodies, which help pull apart copied genetic information, are shown in magenta. This video was captured using wide-field microscopy with deconvolution. <Br><Br> Related to images <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6791">6791</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6792">6792</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6793">6793</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6794">6794</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6797">6797</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6798">6798</a>, and video <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6796">6796</a>.1/21/2022 4:00:15 PM1/21/2022 4:00:15 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified YeastCells5-T    Thumbnail 1361 KB 1/14/2022 9:25 AM Dolan, Lauren (NIH/NIGMS) [C I am linking to a dropbox STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{38C495BD-B412-4D55-ADE6-85DC79403CE7}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6807526Fruit fly (<em>Drosophila melanogaster</em>) ovaries with DNA shown in magenta and actin filaments shown in light blue. This image was captured using a confocal laser scanning microscope. <Br><Br> Related to image <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6806">6806</a>. 1/21/2022 3:54:37 PM1/21/2022 3:54:37 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 6807_M    Medium 503 KB 2/11/2022 2:22 PM Crowley, Rachel (NIH/NIGMS) [E The image was acquired on a Nikon STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{D9DE9B13-7DC9-4BB0-AA55-E415609A5F44}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6788555Meiosis is used to make sperm and egg cells. During meiosis, a cell's chromosomes are copied once, but the cell divides twice. During mitosis, the chromosomes are copied once, and the cell divides once. For simplicity, cells are illustrated with only three pairs of chromosomes.<Br><Br> See image <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=1333">1333</a> for an unlabeled version of this illustration.1/21/2022 4:01:54 PM1/21/2022 4:01:54 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified ITC_MitoMeio_layout (1)_M    Medium 45 KB 12/1/2021 2:08 PM Crowley, Rachel (NIH/NIGMS) [E STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{9B45CCDD-6A3A-4182-A4F5-92C942058028}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6808584Two fruit fly (<em>Drosophila melanogaster</em>) larvae brains with neurons expressing fluorescently tagged tubulin protein. Tubulin makes up strong, hollow fibers called microtubules that play important roles in neuron growth and migration during brain development. This image was captured using confocal microscopy, and the color indicates the position of the neurons within the brain.1/20/2022 7:49:11 PM1/20/2022 7:49:11 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Drosophila 3rd instar larval brain expressing neuronal tubulin-Wen Lu and Vladimir I. Gelfand_M    Medium 175 KB STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{8643DBC3-712E-4596-B178-AE3E38631BAB}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6797692Yeast cells that abnormally accumulate cell wall material (blue) at their ends and, when preparing to divide, in their middles. This image was captured using wide-field microscopy with deconvolution. <Br><Br> Related to images <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6791">6791</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6792">6792</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6793">6793</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6794">6794</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6798">6798</a>, and videos <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6795">6795</a> and <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6796">6796</a>.1/21/2022 3:59:29 PM1/21/2022 3:59:29 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified YeastCells7_S    Low 12 KB 3/8/2022 9:44 AM Bigler, Abbey (NIH/NIGMS) [C Some of them have one blue end, and STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{DDA4D0F0-1444-48F3-91F8-795F76B0BC06}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6798698Yeast cells with nuclear envelopes shown in magenta and tubulin shown in light blue. The nuclear envelope defines the borders of the nucleus, which houses DNA. Tubulin is a protein that makes up microtubules—strong, hollow fibers that provide structure to cells and help direct chromosomes during cell division. This image was captured using wide-field microscopy with deconvolution. <Br><Br> Related to images <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6791">6791</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6792">6792</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6793">6793</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6794">6794</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6797">6797</a>, and videos <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6795">6795</a> and <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6796">6796</a>.1/21/2022 3:59:06 PM1/21/2022 3:59:06 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified YeastCells8_M    Low 19 KB 1/28/2022 2:22 PM Dolan, Lauren (NIH/NIGMS) [C Alt text: Oblong yeast cells, each STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{3BE03231-0BFB-4A6D-93AC-9F52ADA3C1C4}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6796699During cell division, spindle pole bodies (glowing dots) move toward the ends of yeast cells to separate copied genetic information. Contractile rings (glowing bands) form in cells’ middles and constrict to help them split. This time-lapse video was captured using wide-field microscopy with deconvolution. <Br><Br> Related to images <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6791">6791</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6792">6792</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6793">6793</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6794">6794</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6797">6797</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6798">6798</a>, and video <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6795">6795</a>.1/21/2022 3:59:58 PM1/21/2022 3:59:58 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified pombe6-L    High 762 KB 1/14/2022 9:40 AM Dolan, Lauren (NIH/NIGMS) [C Dividing yeast cells with spindle pole STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{7FD476D8-E47B-4B9D-8037-534941C36318}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
101039479A light microscope image of a cell from the endosperm of an African globe lily (<i>Scadoxus katherinae</i>). This is one frame of a time-lapse sequence that shows cell division in action. The lily is considered a good organism for studying cell division because its chromosomes are much thicker and easier to see than human ones. Staining shows microtubules in red and chromosomes in blue. Here, condensed chromosomes are clearly visible and are separating to form the cores of two new cells.5/9/2022 1:42:13 PM5/9/2022 1:42:13 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified lilymit10_S    Low 15 KB 9/8/2016 2:24 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C Here, condensed chromosomes are clearly visible and are separating to form STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{13C7DFA2-E544-4331-9DCE-2395262F2E91}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
101139483A light microscope image of cells from the endosperm of an African globe lily (<i>Scadoxus katherinae</i>). This is one frame of a time-lapse sequence that shows cell division in action. The lily is considered a good organism for studying cell division because its chromosomes are much thicker and easier to see than human ones. Staining shows microtubules in red and chromosomes in blue. Here, condensed chromosomes are clearly visible and have separated into the opposite sides of a dividing cell.5/9/2022 1:41:49 PM5/9/2022 1:41:49 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified lilymit11_S    Low 12 KB 9/8/2016 2:26 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C Here, condensed chromosomes are clearly visible and have separated into the STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{6FEE2F71-D4CD-4B52-BF2B-BC2252AF9868}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
101239486A light microscope image of a cell from the endosperm of an African globe lily (<i>Scadoxus katherinae</i>). This is one frame of a time-lapse sequence that shows cell division in action. The lily is considered a good organism for studying cell division because its chromosomes are much thicker and easier to see than human ones. Staining shows microtubules in red and chromosomes in blue.5/9/2022 1:42:46 PM5/9/2022 1:42:46 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified lilymit2_S    Low 13 KB 9/8/2016 2:28 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C A light microscope image of a cell from the endosperm of an African STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{C8B137B6-B281-434D-A7DA-DDF119C39F2F}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
101339488A light microscope image of a cell from the endosperm of an African globe lily (<i>Scadoxus katherinae</i>). This is one frame of a time-lapse sequence that shows cell division in action. The lily is considered a good organism for studying cell division because its chromosomes are much thicker and easier to see than human ones. Staining shows microtubules in red and chromosomes in blue.5/9/2022 1:44:09 PM5/9/2022 1:44:09 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified lilymit3_S    Low 10 KB 9/8/2016 2:29 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C A light microscope image of a cell from the endosperm of an African STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{FD80F5EE-09EC-4AD2-B64C-DD18486A7B3D}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
101439489A light microscope image of a cell from the endosperm of an African globe lily (<i>Scadoxus katherinae</i>). This is one frame of a time-lapse sequence that shows cell division in action. The lily is considered a good organism for studying cell division because its chromosomes are much thicker and easier to see than human ones. Staining shows microtubules in red and chromosomes in blue.5/9/2022 1:44:44 PM5/9/2022 1:44:44 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified lilymit4_S    Low 13 KB 9/8/2016 2:31 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C A light microscope image of a cell from the endosperm of an African STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{309B5B6A-0FB8-4D2F-8587-E48F1460DAC0}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
101539490A light microscope image of a cell from the endosperm of an African globe lily (<i>Scadoxus katherinae</i>). This is one frame of a time-lapse sequence that shows cell division in action. The lily is considered a good organism for studying cell division because its chromosomes are much thicker and easier to see than human ones. Staining shows microtubules in red and chromosomes in blue. Here, condensed chromosomes are clearly visible.5/9/2022 1:45:42 PM5/9/2022 1:45:42 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified lilymit5_S    Low 13 KB 9/8/2016 2:34 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C A light microscope image of a cell STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{4DD43D2A-0C02-4493-8C1D-98468D1E78BB}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
101639491A light microscope image of a cell from the endosperm of an African globe lily (<i>Scadoxus katherinae</i>). This is one frame of a time-lapse sequence that shows cell division in action. The lily is considered a good organism for studying cell division because its chromosomes are much thicker and easier to see than human ones. Staining shows microtubules in red and chromosomes in blue. Here, condensed chromosomes are clearly visible and are starting to line up.5/9/2022 1:46:20 PM5/9/2022 1:46:20 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified lilymit6_S    Low 13 KB 9/8/2016 2:35 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C Here, condensed chromosomes are clearly visible and are starting to line up STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{AC000F80-45A5-4619-A533-FA820938185C}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
101739492A light microscope image of a cell from the endosperm of an African globe lily (<i>Scadoxus katherinae</i>). This is one frame of a time-lapse sequence that shows cell division in action. The lily is considered a good organism for studying cell division because its chromosomes are much thicker and easier to see than human ones. Staining shows microtubules in red and chromosomes in blue. Here, condensed chromosomes are clearly visible and have lined up in the middle of the dividing cell.5/9/2022 1:46:58 PM5/9/2022 1:46:58 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified lilymit7_S    Low 10 KB 9/8/2016 2:37 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C Here, condensed chromosomes are clearly visible and have lined up in the STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{7950E1EF-8698-4948-87BF-364CE02E8679}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
101839493A light microscope image of a cell from the endosperm of an African globe lily (<i>Scadoxus katherinae</i>). This is one frame of a time-lapse sequence that shows cell division in action. The lily is considered a good organism for studying cell division because its chromosomes are much thicker and easier to see than human ones. Staining shows microtubules in red and chromosomes in blue. Here, condensed chromosomes are clearly visible near the end of a round of mitosis.5/9/2022 1:47:39 PM5/9/2022 1:47:39 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified lilymit12_S    Low 11 KB 9/8/2016 2:38 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C Here, condensed chromosomes are clearly visible near the end of a round of STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{EC39C1AF-4CC5-493C-9E66-30CBA1DB3A53}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
101939494A light microscope image of cells from the endosperm of an African globe lily (<i>Scadoxus katherinae</i>). This is one frame of a time-lapse sequence that shows cell division in action. The lily is considered a good organism for studying cell division because its chromosomes are much thicker and easier to see than human ones. Staining shows microtubules in red and chromosomes in blue. Here, two cells have formed after a round of mitosis.5/9/2022 1:48:10 PM5/9/2022 1:48:10 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified lilymit13_S    Low 13 KB 9/8/2016 3:03 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C The lily is considered a good organism for studying cell division because its chromosomes are much thicker and easier to see STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{F7A7A261-CDEE-485E-8F24-D1923EE9C099}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
102139495A light microscope image of a cell from the endosperm of an African globe lily (<i>Scadoxus katherinae</i>). This is one frame of a time-lapse sequence that shows cell division in action. The lily is considered a good organism for studying cell division because its chromosomes are much thicker and easier to see than human ones. Staining shows microtubules in red and chromosomes in blue. Here, condensed chromosomes are clearly visible and lined up.5/9/2022 1:48:39 PM5/9/2022 1:48:39 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified lilymit8_S    Low 12 KB 9/8/2016 2:40 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C A light microscope image of a cell from the endosperm of an African STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{043568AC-3AD1-48FD-97C9-60AB01D5A133}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
102239496A light microscope image of a cell from the endosperm of an African globe lily (<i>Scadoxus katherinae</i>). This is one frame of a time-lapse sequence that shows cell division in action. The lily is considered a good organism for studying cell division because its chromosomes are much thicker and easier to see than human ones. Staining shows microtubules in red and chromosomes in blue. Here, condensed chromosomes are clearly visible and are starting to separate to form two new cells.8/14/2020 5:50:57 PM8/14/2020 5:50:57 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified lilymit9_S    Low 13 KB 9/8/2016 2:41 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C Here, condensed chromosomes are clearly visible and are starting to separate STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{AF745663-6F5E-464D-BEF5-704A80B8E28D}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
104739497Stereo triplet of a sea urchin embryo stained to reveal actin filaments (orange) and microtubules (blue). This image is part of a series of images: <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=1048">image 1048</a> , <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=1049">image 1049</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=1050">image 1050</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=1051">image 1051</a> and <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=1052">image 1052</a>.8/14/2020 5:54:53 PM8/14/2020 5:54:53 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified triplet1_S    Low 10 KB 9/8/2016 2:22 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C Stereo triplet of a sea urchin embryo STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{B60A7EDB-17C6-492C-975B-DCFB1E79CD14}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
104839498Stereo triplet of a sea urchin embryo stained to reveal actin filaments (orange) and microtubules (blue). This image is part of a series of images: <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=1047">image 1047</a> , <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=1049">image 1049</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=1050">image 1050</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=1051">image 1051</a> and <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=1052">image 1052</a>.8/14/2020 5:58:28 PM8/14/2020 5:58:28 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified triplet2_S    Low 8 KB 9/8/2016 2:20 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C Stereo triplet of a sea urchin embryo STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{1CDB20E5-FD75-4EAB-84A2-F83EFE6CEAF3}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
104939499Stereo triplet of a sea urchin embryo stained to reveal actin filaments (orange) and microtubules (blue). This image is part of a series of images: <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=1047">image 1047</a> , <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=1048">image 1048</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=1050">image 1050</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=1051">image 1051</a> and <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=1052">image 1052</a>.8/14/2020 6:02:18 PM8/14/2020 6:02:18 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified triplet3_S    Low 8 KB 9/8/2016 2:18 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C Stereo triplet of a sea urchin embryo STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{BB262863-B1A6-437D-B271-995AA6704827}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
105039500Stereo triplet of a sea urchin embryo stained to reveal actin filaments (orange) and microtubules (blue). This image is part of a series of images: <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=1047">image 1047</a> , <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=1048">image 1048</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=1049">image 1049</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=1051">image 1051</a> and <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=1052">image 1052</a>.8/14/2020 6:05:27 PM8/14/2020 6:05:27 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified triplet6_S    Low 8 KB 9/8/2016 2:16 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C Stereo triplet of a sea urchin embryo STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{47B823DA-62D8-42C2-A17D-8080F6BFCB34}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
105139501Stereo triplet of a sea urchin embryo stained to reveal actin filaments (orange) and microtubules (blue). This image is part of a series of images: <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=1047">image 1047</a> , <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=1048">image 1048</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=1049">image 1049</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=1050">image 1050</a> and <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=1052">image 1052</a>.8/14/2020 6:08:13 PM8/14/2020 6:08:13 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified triplet7_S    Low 8 KB 9/8/2016 2:14 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C Stereo triplet of a sea urchin embryo STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{E76B5E1E-B8EF-48E6-9D0B-9E4523206874}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
105239502Stereo triplet of a sea urchin embryo stained to reveal actin filaments (orange) and microtubules (blue). This image is part of a series of images: <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=1047">image 1047</a> , <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=1048">image 1048</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=1049">image 1049</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=1050">image 1050</a> and <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=1051">image 1051</a>.8/14/2020 6:10:50 PM8/14/2020 6:10:50 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified triplet8_S    Low 11 KB 9/8/2016 2:12 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C Stereo triplet of a sea urchin embryo STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{8B140C61-F13C-462B-9A3C-226DCB9E6868}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
105639503Cross-section of skin anatomy shows layers and different tissue types.8/14/2020 6:17:32 PM8/14/2020 6:17:32 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 300skin_M    Medium 177 KB 7/27/2016 11:50 AM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{73490105-234B-442A-8E63-4A41597D14B1}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
105839504A light microscope image shows the chromosomes, stained dark blue, in a dividing cell of an African globe lily (<i>Scadoxus katherinae</i>). This is one frame of a time-lapse sequence that shows cell division in action. The lily is considered a good organism for studying cell division because its chromosomes are much thicker and easier to see than human ones.11/1/2021 4:41:55 PM11/1/2021 4:41:55 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified F04101GMS_blue_cell_source_M    Medium 66 KB 9/2/2020 8:17 AM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{545624AF-29A9-4F44-905B-64054680F619}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
109139522Glial cells (stained green) in a fruit fly developing embryo have survived thanks to a signaling pathway initiated by neighboring nerve cells (stained red).8/27/2020 8:56:25 PM8/27/2020 8:56:25 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified NIH_picHR_S    Low 54 KB 8/25/2016 5:29 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{AB4185D1-7391-479E-AAB7-054DDB7179F7}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131