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3334933It has been said that gastrulation is the most important event in a person's life. This part of early embryonic development transforms a simple ball of cells and begins to define cell fate and the body axis. In a study published in Science magazine in March 2012, NIGMS grantee Bob Goldstein and his research group studied how contractions of actomyosin filaments in C. elegans and Drosophila embryos lead to dramatic rearrangements of cell and embryonic structure. This research is described in detail in the following <a href=http://www.sciencemag.org/content/335/6073/1232.abstract target="_blank"> article</a>: "Triggering a Cell Shape Change by Exploiting Preexisting Actomyosin Contractions." In these images, myosin (green) and plasma membrane (red) are highlighted at four timepoints in gastrulation in the roundworm C. elegans. The blue highlights in the top three frames show how cells are internalized, and the site of closure around the involuting cells is marked with an arrow in the last frame. See related image 3297.3/18/2022 4:17:40 PM3/18/2022 4:17:40 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 3334_Four_timepoints_in_gastrulation_S    Low 94 KB 3/29/2019 10:07 AM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx8780https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{1A2F782A-4872-4628-98F9-5A8C9E7D1034}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
1329771A cell in metaphase during mitosis: The copied chromosomes align in the middle of the spindle. Mitosis is responsible for growth and development, as well as for replacing injured or worn out cells throughout the body. For simplicity, mitosis is illustrated here with only six chromosomes. Appears in the NIGMS booklet <a href="http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/insidethecell/" target="_blank"><i>Inside the Cell</i></a>.10/28/2020 8:07:19 PM10/28/2020 8:07:19 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified ITC_Mito_meta_Copy_M    Medium 40 KB 10/28/2020 4:06 PM McCulley, Jennifer (NIH/NIDCD) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx3795110https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{0AD97DB2-EE2C-4177-A434-A961D017F962}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
1157641Image of <i>Streptococcus</i>, a type (genus) of spherical bacteria that can colonize the throat and back of the mouth. Stroptococci often occur in pairs or in chains, as shown here.3/13/2023 7:27:13 PM3/13/2023 7:27:13 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 1157_strept1color__S    Low 154 KB 3/29/2019 2:02 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx98100https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{229D3635-54DB-44A1-B714-B5BF987E6975}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
1166572<i>Leptospira</i>, shown here in green, is a type (genus) of elongated, spiral-shaped bacteria. Infection can cause Weil's disease, a kind of jaundice, in humans.3/13/2023 7:29:38 PM3/13/2023 7:29:38 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified leptoc2color_M    Medium 194 KB 10/28/2020 11:46 AM McCulley, Jennifer (NIH/NIDCD) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx9790https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{7145A65C-BB14-4F68-9904-ABCBB1287DE5}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
1275769The Golgi complex, also called the Golgi apparatus or, simply, the Golgi. This organelle receives newly made proteins and lipids from the ER, puts the finishing touches on them, addresses them, and sends them to their final destinations. Appears in the NIGMS booklet <a href="http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/insidethecell/" target="_blank"><i>Inside the Cell</i></a>.10/28/2020 4:29:29 PM10/28/2020 4:29:29 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified ITC_Golgi_inset_Copy_M    Medium 28 KB 10/28/2020 12:29 PM McCulley, Jennifer (NIH/NIDCD) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx3992450https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{F1ACB139-25A3-4C54-8EE3-575084FC6DB6}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
57291189The HIV capsid is pear-shaped structure that is made of proteins the virus needs to mature and become infective. The capsid is inside the virus and delivers the virus' genetic information into a human cell. To better understand how the HIV capsid does this feat, scientists have used computer programs to simulate its assembly. This image shows a series of snapshots of the steps that grow the HIV capsid. A model of a complete capsid is shown on the far right of the image for comparison; the green, blue and red colors indicate different configurations of the capsid protein that make up the capsid “shell.” The bar in the left corner represents a length of 20 nanometers, which is less than a tenth the size of the smallest bacterium. Computer models like this also may be used to reconstruct the assembly of the capsids of other important viruses, such as Ebola or the Zika virus. <br><br> The studies reporting this research were published in <a href="http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2016/160513/ncomms11568/full/ncomms11568.html"><i>Nature Communications</i></a> and <a href="http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v469/n7330/full/nature09640.html"><i>Nature</i></a>. <br><br> To learn more about how researchers used computer simulations to track the assembly of the HIV capsid, see <a href=" https://news.uchicago.edu/article/2016/06/14/simulations-describe-hivs-diabolical-delivery-device">this press release from the University of Chicago</a>.12/18/2020 4:10:47 PM12/18/2020 4:10:47 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified HIV capsid synthesis 222px_TransparentBackground-1_S    Thumbnail 127 KB 3/20/2017 9:21 AM Machalek, Alisa STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx145110https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{C1FD6483-5B69-49FD-9F08-5665166A3E1D}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
68091233Two fruit fly (<em>Drosophila melanogaster</em>) egg cells, one on each side of the central black line. The colorful swirls show the circular movement of cytoplasm—called ooplasmic streaming—that occurs in late egg cell development in wild-type (right) and mutant (left) oocytes. This image was captured using confocal microscopy. <Br><Br> More information on the research that produced this image can be found in the <em>Journal of Cell Biology</em> paper <a href="https://rupress.org/jcb/article/217/10/3497/120275/Ooplasmic-flow-cooperates-with-transport-and">“Ooplasmic flow cooperates with transport and anchorage in <em>Drosophila</em> oocyte posterior determination”</a> by Lu et al. 1/21/2022 3:52:59 PM1/21/2022 3:52:59 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Drosophila ooplasmic streaming_T    Thumbnail 2 KB 2/11/2022 1:41 PM Crowley, Rachel (NIH/NIGMS) [E STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx114300https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{4D253170-106E-4EDF-AE42-322E3351BAE7}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
67771334A 3D model of the human endoplasmic reticulum membrane protein complex (EMC) that identifies its nine essential subunits. The EMC plays an important role in making membrane proteins, which are essential for all cellular processes. This is the first atomic-level depiction of the EMC. Its structure was obtained using single-particle cryo-electron microscopy.12/6/2021 8:02:51 PM12/6/2021 8:02:51 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified EMC_NIGMSVideoGallery-Lg    High 4824 KB 12/7/2021 10:06 AM Dolan, Lauren (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx96200https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{6B9B0617-6BFC-4A30-8D67-74F630BF8AAD}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
68041228<em>Staphylococcus aureus</em> bacteria (blue) on the porous coating of a femoral hip stem used in hip replacement surgery. The relatively rough surface of an implant is a favorable environment for bacteria to attach and grow. This can lead to the development of biofilms, which can cause infections. The researchers who took this image are working to understand where biofilms are likely to develop. This knowledge could support the prevention and treatment of infections. A scanning electron microscope was used to capture this image. <Br><Br>More information on the research that produced this image can be found in the <em>Antibiotics</em> paper<a href="https://www.mdpi.com/2079-6382/10/8/889"> "Free-floating aggregate and single-cell-initiated biofilms of <em>Staphylococcus aureus</em>" </a>by Gupta et al. <Br><Br>Related to image <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6803">6803</a> and video <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6805">6805</a>.10/18/2023 2:56:58 PM10/18/2023 2:56:58 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified S. aureus in the porous coating of a femoral stem_M    Medium 73 KB 1/20/2022 1:51 PM Crowley, Rachel (NIH STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx98180https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{F8EB39E7-349E-48B6-A64F-0CDEEC68BEB6}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
35801158Industrious V. cholerae bacteria (yellow) tend to thrive in denser biofilms (left) while moochers (red) thrive in weaker biofilms (right). More information about the research behind this image can be found in a <a href="http://biobeat.nigms.nih.gov/2014/02/cool-image-denying-microbial-moochers/">Biomedical Beat Blog posting</a> from February 2014.10/5/2020 6:16:25 AM10/5/2020 6:16:25 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified V_M._cholerae_biofilms_32    Medium 50 KB 6/3/2016 3:32 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx110170https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{21F937D8-3F14-4784-AC98-9E76BB4A34A8}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
1102639This image shows two components of the cytoskeleton, microtubules (green) and actin filaments (red), in an endothelial cell derived from a cow lung. The cystoskeleton provides the cell with an inner framework and enables it to move and change shape.3/13/2023 7:34:03 PM3/13/2023 7:34:03 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified prettycellb_M    Medium 26 KB 1/28/2021 8:06 AM McCulley, Jennifer (NIH/NIDCD) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx95210https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{FB4E12C9-A3D5-4790-ACFD-0086EA78117C}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
58951006Details about the basic biology and chemistry of the ingredients that produce bioluminescence are allowing scientists to harness it as an imaging tool. Credit: Nathan Shaner, Scintillon Institute.<br></br> From Biomedical Beat article July 2017: <a href="https://biobeat.nigms.nih.gov/2017/07/chasing-fireflies-and-better-cellular-imaging-techniques/#more-4455">Chasing Fireflies—and Better Cellular Imaging Techniques</a>3/1/2021 7:16:46 PM3/1/2021 7:16:46 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified bioluminescent microcentrifuge tubes_M    Medium 132 KB 7/21/2017 1:40 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx89180https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{F551D249-3908-41B8-8C99-C5109BA71043}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
58741050Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) has the power to capture details of proteins and other small biological structures at the molecular level.&nbsp; This image shows proteins in the capsid, or outer cover, of bacteriophage P22, a virus that infects the Salmonella bacteria.&nbsp; Each color shows the structure and position of an individual protein in the capsid.&nbsp; Thousands of cryo-EM scans capture the structure and shape of all the individual proteins in the capsid and their position relative to other proteins. A computer model combines these scans into the 3-dimension image shown here.&nbsp; Related to image <a href="/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID2=5875">5875</a>.12/18/2020 9:09:51 PM12/18/2020 9:09:51 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Bacteriophage22-cryoEM-T    Thumbnail 49 KB 6/23/2017 1:27 PM Machalek, Alisa (NIH/NIAMS) [E STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx95250https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{B795949D-2B81-40F1-A108-BA57CBB23572}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
1178573This image of laboratory-grown cells was taken with the help of a scanning electron microscope, which yields detailed images of cell surfaces.3/13/2023 7:27:36 PM3/13/2023 7:27:36 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Cc6-1_M    Medium 136 KB 10/28/2020 10:56 AM McCulley, Jennifer (NIH/NIDCD) [C You can probably also use the STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx100220https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{35C19F9C-DCAE-43C4-A186-1D023A74CBF3}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
69701348Multicellular yeast called snowflake yeast that researchers created through many generations of directed evolution from unicellular yeast. Cells are connected to one another by their cell walls, shown in blue. Stained cytoplasm (green) and membranes (magenta) show that the individual cells remain separate. This image was captured using spinning disk confocal microscopy. <Br><Br> Related to images <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6969">6969</a> and <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6971">6971</a>.11/15/2023 1:15:17 PM11/15/2023 1:15:17 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Snowflake Yeast 2_S    Low 56 KB 2/3/2023 5:02 PM Bigler, Abbey (NIH/NIGMS) [C Br><Br> I'm more than happy STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx156160https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{6131B071-A4E1-4EAB-9666-CA6A3FAF1CA7}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
68061230The two large, central, round shapes are ovaries from a typical fruit fly (<em>Drosophila melanogaster</em>). The small butterfly-like structures surrounding them are fruit fly ovaries where researchers suppressed the expression of a gene that controls microtubule polymerization and is necessary for normal development. This image was captured using a confocal laser scanning microscope. <Br><Br> Related to image <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6807">6807</a>. 1/21/2022 3:55:03 PM1/21/2022 3:55:03 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Wild-type and mutant fruit fly ovaries_M    Medium 119 KB 2/11/2022 1:44 PM Dolan, Lauren (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx117140https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{1CE96574-AF64-43B2-8987-EDADC4899FE7}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
68991301High-resolution time lapse of epithelial (skin) cell migration and wound healing. It shows an image taken every 13 seconds over the course of almost 14 minutes. The images were captured with quantitative orientation-independent differential interference contrast (DIC) microscope (left) and a conventional DIC microscope (right). <Br><Br>More information about the research that produced this video can be found in the <em>Journal of Microscopy</em> paper <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jmi.12682/">“An Orientation-Independent DIC Microscope Allows High Resolution Imaging of Epithelial Cell Migration and Wound Healing in a Cnidarian Model”</a> by Malamy and Shribak. 6/30/2022 4:45:48 PM6/30/2022 4:45:48 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified circularlamellipodia    High 17708 KB 6/30/2022 3:03 PM Crowley, Rachel (NIH/NIGMS) [E STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx8270https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{497BC427-08F6-402E-B25B-3FF48F096460}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
37411181The photo shows a confocal microscopy image of perineuronal nets (PNNs), which are specialized extracellular matrix (ECM) structures in the brain. The PNN surrounds some nerve cells in brain regions including the cortex, hippocampus and thalamus. Researchers study the PNN to investigate their involvement stabilizing the extracellular environment and forming nets around nerve cells and synapses in the brain. Abnormalities in the PNNs have been linked to a variety of disorders, including epilepsy and schizophrenia, and they limit a process called neural plasticity in which new nerve connections are formed. To visualize the PNNs, researchers labeled them with Wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA)-fluorescein. Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3742">image 3742</a>.12/17/2020 5:33:10 PM12/17/2020 5:33:10 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Cortex_neuronal_ECM_L    Low 43 KB 6/3/2016 3:40 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C TEM 5: Soleus muscle ECM on STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx123240https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{49BF2F89-C3EB-46DB-A682-8EF8BF979760}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
37181025Bacterial biofilms are tightly knit communities of bacterial cells growing on, for example, solid surfaces, such as in water pipes or on teeth. Here, cells of the bacterium Bacillus subtilis have formed a biofilm in a laboratory culture. Researchers have discovered that the bacterial cells in a biofilm communicate with each other through electrical signals via specialized potassium ion channels to share resources, such as nutrients, with each other. This insight may help scientists to improve sanitation systems to prevent biofilms, which often resist common treatments, from forming and to develop better medicines to combat bacterial infections. See the Biomedical Beat blog post <a href="http://biobeat.nigms.nih.gov/2015/12/bacterial-biofilms-a-charged-environment /">Bacterial Biofilms: A Charged Environment</a> for more information.2/4/2020 6:02:20 PM2/4/2020 6:02:20 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Bacillus_subtilis_biofilm_S    Low 50 KB 8/26/2016 4:05 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx104110https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{B78D9982-381F-4F28-93AC-ED860CAB3947}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
36751099Stained kidney tissue. The kidney is an essential organ responsible for disposing wastes from the body and for maintaining healthy ion levels in the blood. It also secretes two hormones, erythropoietin (EPO) and calcitriol (a derivative of vitamin D), into the blood. It works like a purifier by pulling break-down products of metabolism, such as urea and ammonium, from the blood stream for excretion in urine. Related to image <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID=677">3725</a>. 2/4/2020 7:58:53 PM2/4/2020 7:58:53 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Slide18    High 423 KB 12/1/2020 1:07 PM Walter, Taylor (NIH/NIGMS) [C The kidney is an essential organ STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx11770https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{7EE212D2-34BF-41C9-93D3-31DA36BC0BD5}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
69661242Melanoma (skin cancer) cells undergoing programmed cell death, also called apoptosis. This process was triggered by raising the pH of the medium that the cells were growing in. Melanoma in people cannot be treated by raising pH because that would also kill healthy cells. This video was taken using a differential interference contrast (DIC) microscope.1/27/2023 9:56:19 PM1/27/2023 9:56:19 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Dying Melanoma Cells Thumbnail    Thumbnail 807 KB 1/27/2023 4:57 PM Bigler, Abbey (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx12480https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{147295DE-FBF3-4ABD-8F77-D53B50BBA0FA}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
1048632Stereo triplet of a sea urchin embryo stained to reveal actin filaments (orange) and microtubules (blue). This image is part of a series of images: <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=1047">image 1047</a> , <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=1049">image 1049</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=1050">image 1050</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=1051">image 1051</a> and <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=1052">image 1052</a>.8/14/2020 5:58:28 PM8/14/2020 5:58:28 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified triplet2_S    Low 8 KB 9/8/2016 2:20 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C Stereo triplet of a sea urchin embryo STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx9390https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{1CDB20E5-FD75-4EAB-84A2-F83EFE6CEAF3}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
65921217Cell-like compartments that spontaneously emerged from scrambled frog eggs, with nuclei (blue) from frog sperm. Endoplasmic reticulum (red) and microtubules (green) are also visible. Image created using confocal microscopy. <br> <p>For more photos of cell-like compartments from frog eggs view: <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6584">6584</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6585">6585</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6586">6586</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6591">6591</a>, and <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6593">6593</a>.</p> <p>For videos of cell-like compartments from frog eggs view:&nbsp;<a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6587">6587</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6588">6588</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6589">6589</a>, and <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6590">6590</a>.</p>9/13/2020 3:38:40 PM9/13/2020 3:38:40 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified img5_cheng_confocal_nuc_t40_M    Medium 66 KB 9/15/2020 10:07 AM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx91100https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{10111D22-D87A-4A9F-82B8-5C98DB9E5D44}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3443875These images show frog cells in interphase. The cells are Xenopus XL177 cells, which are derived from tadpole epithelial cells. The microtubules are green and the chromosomes are blue. Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3442">image 3442</a>.8/22/2020 5:30:27 PM8/22/2020 5:30:27 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified interphs    High 1903 KB 6/3/2016 3:29 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C The microtubules are green and the STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx11090https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{5CE69473-3A28-4887-B8C1-AA71A16B23A9}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3736984The extracellular matrix (ECM) is most prevalent in connective tissues but also is present between the stems (axons) of nerve cells, as shown here. Blue-colored nerve cell axons are surrounded by brown-colored, myelin-supplying Schwann cells, which act like insulation around an electrical wire to help speed the transmission of electric nerve impulses down the axon. The ECM is pale pink. The tiny brown spots within it are the collagen fibers that are part of the ECM.12/17/2020 4:38:32 PM12/17/2020 4:38:32 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified myelinating_axons_L    Low 106 KB 6/3/2016 3:40 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C TEM 5: Soleus muscle ECM on the muscle surface STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx120110https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{6FE83BF5-351D-471D-BB22-F0A000BC68F5}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
57511191Antibiotic resistance in microbes is a serious health concern. So researchers have turned their attention to how bacteria undo the action of some antibiotics. Here, scientists set out to find the conditions that help individual bacterial cells survive in the presence of the antibiotic rifampicin. The research team used Mycobacterium smegmatis, a more harmless relative of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which infects the lung and other organs and causes serious disease. <Br><Br>In this image, genetically identical mycobacteria are growing in a miniature growth chamber called a microfluidic chamber. Using live imaging, the researchers found that individual mycobacteria will respond differently to the antibiotic, depending on the growth stage and other timing factors. The researchers used genetic tagging with green fluorescent protein to distinguish cells that can resist rifampicin and those that cannot. With this gene tag, cells tolerant of the antibiotic light up in green and those that are susceptible in violet, enabling the team to monitor the cells' responses in real time. <Br><Br> To learn more about how the researchers studied antibiotic resistance in Mycobacterium, see <a href="http://now.tufts.edu/news-releases/individual-mycobacteria-respond-differently-antibiotics-based-growth-and-timing">this news release from Tufts University</a>. Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID=2990">video 5752</a>.12/18/2020 4:27:18 PM12/18/2020 4:27:18 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 5751_SSBGFP_RIF2_40ul_100313_17_S    Low 107 KB 3/28/2019 3:25 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx112100https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{9AAEDFAF-443D-4710-BA88-4BEBD4E1B128}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2747844This video shows an instance of abnormal mitosis where chromosomes are late to align. The video demonstrates the spindle checkpoint in action: just one unaligned chromosome can delay anaphase and the completion of mitosis. The cells shown are S3 tissue cultured cells from <i>Xenopus laevis</i>, African clawed frog.8/18/2020 7:49:01 PM8/18/2020 7:49:01 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2747_Cell_division_with_late_aligning_chromosomes_S    Low 62 KB 3/29/2019 10:58 AM Constantinides, Stephen STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx9390https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{FD7DD0B5-4B32-4B66-BEE4-BB5168CB81FD}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2423675Network diagram showing a map of protein-protein interactions in a yeast (<i>Saccharomyces cerevisiae</i>) cell. This cluster includes 78 percent of the proteins in the yeast proteome. The color of a node represents the phenotypic effect of removing the corresponding protein (red, lethal; green, nonlethal; orange, slow growth; yellow, unknown).8/17/2020 9:20:50 PM8/17/2020 9:20:50 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified protein_map182    High 229 KB 6/3/2016 3:10 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C I'm more than happy to allow to use STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx84100https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{F93DC033-4F3F-4368-8211-AD3F2769B90F}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
69621238A <em>Trigonium</em> diatom imaged by a quantitative orientation-independent differential interference contrast (OI-DIC) microscope. Diatoms are single-celled photosynthetic algae with mineralized cell walls that contain silica and provide protection and support. These organisms form an important part of the plankton at the base of the marine and freshwater food chains. The width of this image is 90 μm. <Br><Br> More information about the microscopy that produced this image can be found in the <em>Journal of Microscopy</em> paper <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jmi.12682/">“An Orientation-Independent DIC Microscope Allows High Resolution Imaging of Epithelial Cell Migration and Wound Healing in a Cnidarian Model”</a> by Malamy and Shribak. 1/27/2023 9:46:30 PM1/27/2023 9:46:30 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Trigonium_M    Medium 692 KB 1/27/2023 4:29 PM Bigler, Abbey (NIH/NIGMS) [C The image width is 90 μm STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx155100https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{F78335F9-FB37-4883-9939-AEB00AE242F9}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
36771100Cross section of human skeletal muscle. Image taken with a confocal fluorescent light microscope.12/1/2020 6:09:36 PM12/1/2020 6:09:36 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Slide35    High 284 KB 12/1/2020 1:09 PM Walter, Taylor (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx8970https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{A561A04A-186A-449A-88E2-FC32FB8148C9}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
57561116Pigment cells are cells that give skin its color. In fishes and amphibians, like frogs and salamanders, pigment cells are responsible for the characteristic skin patterns that help these organisms to blend into their surroundings or attract mates. The pigment cells are derived from neural crest cells, which are cells originating from the neural tube in the early embryo. This image shows pigment cells from pearl danio, a relative of the popular laboratory animal zebrafish. Investigating pigment cell formation and migration in animals helps answer important fundamental questions about the factors that control pigmentation in the skin of animals, including humans. Related to images <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID=2996">5754</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID=3000">5755</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID=3011">5757</a> and <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID=3016">5758.12/18/2020 4:53:41 PM12/18/2020 4:53:41 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified parichy-02_M    Medium 67 KB 7/13/2016 5:57 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C I’d be happy to make some high STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx8470https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{09E26DA0-9005-49C0-A268-3998B5DA6C97}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
57521192Antibiotic resistance in microbes is a serious health concern. So researchers have turned their attention to how bacteria undo the action of some antibiotics. Here, scientists set out to find the conditions that help individual bacterial cells survive in the presence of the antibiotic rifampicin. The research team used Mycobacterium smegmatis, a more harmless relative of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which infects the lung and other organs to cause serious disease.<Br><Br> In this video, genetically identical mycobacteria are growing in a miniature growth chamber called a microfluidic chamber. Using live imaging, the researchers found that individual mycobacteria will respond differently to the antibiotic, depending on the growth stage and other timing factors. The researchers used genetic tagging with green fluorescent protein to distinguish cells that can resist rifampicin and those that cannot. With this gene tag, cells tolerant of the antibiotic light up in green and those that are susceptible in violet, enabling the team to monitor the cells' responses in real time. <Br><Br> To learn more about how the researchers studied antibiotic resistance in Mycobacterium, see <a href="http://now.tufts.edu/news-releases/individual-mycobacteria-respond-differently-antibiotics-based-growth-and-timing">this news release from Tufts University</a>. Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID=2986">image 5751</a>. 12/18/2020 4:30:09 PM12/18/2020 4:30:09 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 5752_SSBGFP_RIF2_40ul_100313_22_R3D_final-1_S    Low 60 KB 3/28/2019 3:24 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx10380https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{B047CD99-8652-40DA-9486-2419FB70E5F6}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
67481244A replica of a human retina grown from stem cells. It shows rod photoreceptors (nerve cells responsible for dark vision) in green and red/green cones (nerve cells responsible for red and green color vision) in red. The cell nuclei are stained blue. This image was captured using a confocal microscope.3/18/2021 2:46:22 PM3/18/2021 2:46:22 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified PRs retinal organoid og_large_M    Medium 277 KB 3/18/2021 10:39 AM Walter, Taylor (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx9680https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{7745E02E-83F3-4FCE-A6AA-6A8FD7660CB1}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3644974Just 22 hours after fertilization, this zebrafish embryo is already taking shape. By 36 hours, all of the major organs will have started to form. The zebrafish's rapid growth and see-through embryo make it ideal for scientists studying how organs develop. This image is part of the Life: Magnified collection, which was displayed in the Gateway Gallery at Washington Dulles International Airport June 3, 2014, to January 21, 2015. To see all 46 images in this exhibit, go to https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/life-magnified/Pages/default.aspx.11/28/2022 9:47:40 PM11/28/2022 9:47:40 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 10_2_ZebrafishEmbryo    High 3224 KB 11/25/2020 11:08 AM Walter, Taylor (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx8890https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{EFC93598-A9C4-4712-A66F-7BB63D0EAD93}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2431681Cells in an early-stage fruit fly embryo, showing the DIAP1 protein (pink), an inhibitor of apoptosis.8/18/2020 9:15:52 PM8/18/2020 9:15:52 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Fruit_fly_embryo__DIAP1_    High 2732 KB 6/3/2016 3:11 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx178160https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{8EE49691-A593-4D52-A276-0812121F89C5}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
638911322/3/2020 7:41:16 PM2/3/2020 7:41:16 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Red and white blood cells in lung_M    Medium 484 KB 3/13/2018 4:02 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx77120https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{80CC8DC3-7C67-40C7-A007-3A53BB871004}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
69671243A cancer cell with three nuclei, shown in turquoise. The abnormal number of nuclei indicates that the cell failed to go through cell division, probably more than once. Mitochondria are shown in yellow, and a protein of the cell’s cytoskeleton appears in red. This video was captured using a confocal microscope.4/28/2023 7:34:13 PM4/28/2023 7:34:13 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Multinucleated Cell Thumbnail    Thumbnail 933 KB 1/27/2023 5:03 PM Bigler, Abbey (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx130110https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{0FF1FCAC-5990-464E-9D64-B3F807DE7936}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2635836A computer model shows how the endoplasmic reticulum is close to and almost wraps around mitochondria in the cell. The endoplasmic reticulum is lime green and the mitochondria are yellow. This image relates to a July 27, 2009, <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/computinglife/cells_circuits.htm target="_blank">article in <em>Computing Life</em></a>.11/6/2020 9:05:38 PM11/6/2020 9:05:38 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 2635_MitochondriaER_S    Low 39 KB 3/29/2019 11:06 AM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx98120https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{D8A0E95C-0812-4C5C-B75C-0C20F648C0EB}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3782988Each of the colored specs in this image is a cell on the surface of a fish scale. To better understand how wounds heal, scientists have inserted genes that make cells brightly glow in different colors into the skin cells of zebrafish, a fish often used in laboratory research. The colors enable the researchers to track each individual cell, for example, as it moves to the location of a cut or scrape over the course of several days. These technicolor fish endowed with glowing skin cells dubbed "skinbow" provide important insight into how tissues recover and regenerate after an injury. <Br><Br>For more information on skinbow fish, see the Biomedical Beat blog post <a href="https://biobeat.nigms.nih.gov/2016/04/visualizing-skin-regeneration-in-real-time/">Visualizing Skin Regeneration in Real Time</a> and <a href="http://today.duke.edu/2016/03/zebrafish">a press release from Duke University highlighting this research</a>. Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID=717"> image 3783</a>.2/4/2020 3:21:30 PM2/4/2020 3:21:30 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 20160509-skinbow-fin-1_M    Medium 299 KB 6/3/2016 3:41 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Each of the colored specs in this image is a cell on STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx9180https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{9F84C2FE-EA85-4A26-AADA-4915D6443B3B}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
69851304<em> Drosophila </em> adult brain showing that an adipokine (fat hormone) generates a response from neurons (aqua) and regulates insulin-producing neurons (red). <Br><Br>Related to images <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6982">6982</a>, <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6983">6983</a>, and <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6984">6984</a>.12/19/2023 9:06:13 PM12/19/2023 9:06:13 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Since the images are too large to attach I have uploaded them at this google drive link and you should be able to download it the link STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx140120https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{B16A02E1-AF2B-43FE-A6EC-37FF25432F66}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2429679The cytoskeleton (green) and DNA (purple) are highlighed in these cells by immunofluorescence.8/17/2020 9:36:09 PM8/17/2020 9:36:09 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Wittmann2_M    Medium 284 KB 9/7/2016 3:05 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx9390https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{3A889D00-8849-4CED-A940-48E94DD31348}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
63521309This image shows how the CRISPR surveillance complex is disabled by two copies of anti-CRISPR protein AcrF1 (red) and one AcrF2 (light green). These anti-CRISPRs block access to the CRISPR RNA (green tube) preventing the surveillance complex from scanning and targeting invading viral DNA for destruction. 12/21/2020 5:09:58 PM12/21/2020 5:09:58 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified CRISPR 2 of 2 NRAMM    High 197 KB 11/29/2017 11:59 AM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx93100https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{152D7892-75BF-4DA9-913D-B1FCC618DA85}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6388113112/21/2020 5:16:51 PM12/21/2020 5:16:51 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified E. coli_M    Medium 203 KB 3/13/2018 3:59 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx107150https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{52B9AB37-C0A9-4E84-9332-67CFB7D18183}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
58681128This image results from a research project to visualize which regions of the adult fruit fly (Drosophila) brain derive from each neural stem cell. First, researchers collected several thousand fruit fly larvae and fluorescently stained a random stem cell in the brain of each. The idea was to create a population of larvae in which each of the 100 or so neural stem cells was labeled at least once. When the larvae grew to adults, the researchers examined the flies’ brains using confocal microscopy. </br>With this technique, the part of a fly’s brain that derived from a single, labeled stem cell “lights up.” The scientists photographed each brain and digitally colorized its lit-up area. By combining thousands of such photos, they created a 3-dimensional, color-coded map that shows which part of the Drosophila brain comes from each of its ~100 neural stem cells. In other words, each colored region shows which neurons are the progeny or “clones” of a single stem cell. This work established a hierarchical structure as well as nomenclature for the neurons in the Drosophila brain. Further research will relate functions to structures of the brain. Related to image <a href="/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID2=5838">5838</a> and video<a href="/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID2=5843"> 5843</a>.5/13/2022 12:37:47 PM5/13/2022 12:37:47 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified droso_x10_blk bg from Utah BTRR--Chris Johnson_ PI_M    Medium 813 KB 12/18/2020 4:02 PM Walter, Taylor (NIH STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx111120https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{EFD1667C-BB60-4249-BF4D-7D58C39BE735}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
1047631Stereo triplet of a sea urchin embryo stained to reveal actin filaments (orange) and microtubules (blue). This image is part of a series of images: <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=1048">image 1048</a> , <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=1049">image 1049</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=1050">image 1050</a>, <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=1051">image 1051</a> and <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=1052">image 1052</a>.8/14/2020 5:54:53 PM8/14/2020 5:54:53 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified triplet1_S    Low 10 KB 9/8/2016 2:22 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C Stereo triplet of a sea urchin embryo STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx87170https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{B60A7EDB-17C6-492C-975B-DCFB1E79CD14}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3266726Bioengineers were able to coax bacteria to blink in unison on microfluidic chips. This image shows a small chip with about 500 blinking bacterial colonies or biopixels. See also entries 3265, 3267, and 3268. From a UC San Diego <a href=http://ucsdnews.ucsd.edu/pressreleases/researchers_create_living_neon_signs_composed_of_millions_of_glowing_bacter/ target="_blank">news release</a>, "Researchers create living 'neon signs' composed of millions of glowing bacteria."12/22/2020 5:27:25 PM12/22/2020 5:27:25 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Hasty2_T    Thumbnail 9 KB 6/3/2016 3:25 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Bioengineers were able to coax bacteria STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx80190https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{D4BCA061-42AD-4024-9216-32D096FBF5DF}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2498690Cells progress through a cycle that consists of phases for growth (blue, green, yellow) and division (red). Cells become quiescent when they exit this cycle (purple). Featured in <a href=http://www.nigms.nih.gov/Publications/Findings.htm target="_blank"><i>Findings</i></a>, February 2003.3/4/2022 8:24:29 PM3/4/2022 8:24:29 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Cell_Cycle1_S    Low 35 KB 9/7/2016 4:19 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx111140https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{78EBD835-9C97-44CB-AF98-FCCE4261D682}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
5777995Many disease-causing microbes rejigger their host’s metabolism and cells for their own ends. A group of pathogenic fungi called microsporidia—which infect and multiply inside animal cells—have taken this rearranging of the cells’ interior to a new level. They reprogram animal cells such that the cells start to fuse, causing them to form long, continuous tubes. As shown in this image of the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans, microsporidia (shown in magenta) have invaded the worm’s gut cells (shown in yellow; the cells’ nuclei are shown in blue) and have instructed the cells to merge. The cell fusion enables the microsporidia to thrive and propagate in the expanded space. Scientists study microsporidia in worms to gain more insight into how these fungi manipulate their host cells. This knowledge might help researchers devise strategies to prevent or stop infections with microsporidia, some of which can cause a human disease called microsporidiosis. This disease causes persistent diarrhea, which can be fatal in people whose immune system doesn’t work properly. <Br><Br> For more on the research into microsporidia, see <a href="http://ucsdnews.ucsd.edu/pressrelease/single_celled_fungi_multiply_alien_like_by_fusing_cells_in_host">this news release from the University of California San Diego</a>. Related to images <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID=3319">5778</a> and <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID=3325">5779</a>.3/15/2021 6:10:24 PM3/15/2021 6:10:24 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 5777_Microsporidia_S    Low 62 KB 3/28/2019 2:37 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx7990https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{2A0E61BD-F87C-45B7-B69F-BE8574B5B481}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
5779997Many disease-causing microbes rejigger their host’s metabolism and cells for their own ends. A group of pathogenic fungi called microsporidia—which infect and multiply inside animal cells—have taken this rearranging of the cells’ interior to a new level. They reprogram animal cells such that the cells start to fuse, causing them to form long, continuous tubes. As shown in this image of the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans, microsporidia (shown in red) have invaded the worm’s gut cells (the large blue dots are the cells' nuclei) and have instructed the cells to merge. The cell fusion enables the microsporidia to thrive and propagate in the expanded space. Scientists study microsporidia in worms to gain more insight into how these fungi manipulate their host cells. This knowledge might help researchers devise strategies to prevent or stop infections with microsporidia, some of which can cause a human disease called microsporidiosis. This disease causes persistent diarrhea, which can be fatal in people whose immune system doesn’t work properly. <Br><Br> For more on the research into microsporidia, see <a href="http://ucsdnews.ucsd.edu/pressrelease/single_celled_fungi_multiply_alien_like_by_fusing_cells_in_host">this news release from the University of California San Diego</a>. Related to images <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID=3314">5777</a> and <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/Pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageID=3319">5778</a>.3/15/2021 6:27:51 PM3/15/2021 6:27:51 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 5779_Microsporidia_S    Low 60 KB 3/28/2019 2:35 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx8260https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{36744676-D001-4466-88D2-3DA09F0D19E0}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2456484Lab-made liposomes contract where Z rings have gathered together and the constriction forces are greatest (arrows). The top picture shows a liposome, and the bottom picture shows fluorescence from Z rings (arrows) inside the same liposome simultaneously.8/20/2020 5:58:21 PM8/20/2020 5:58:21 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Bactdiv_M    Medium 16 KB 6/3/2016 3:11 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx8550https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://imagesadmin.nigms.nih.gov{164D7686-BE0D-459F-9F57-1E2ED31BA325}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131