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696216658A <em>Trigonium</em> diatom imaged by a quantitative orientation-independent differential interference contrast (OI-DIC) microscope. Diatoms are single-celled photosynthetic algae with mineralized cell walls that contain silica and provide protection and support. These organisms form an important part of the plankton at the base of the marine and freshwater food chains. The width of this image is 90 μm. <Br><Br> More information about the microscopy that produced this image can be found in the <em>Journal of Microscopy</em> paper <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jmi.12682/">“An Orientation-Independent DIC Microscope Allows High Resolution Imaging of Epithelial Cell Migration and Wound Healing in a Cnidarian Model”</a> by Malamy and Shribak. 1/27/2023 9:46:30 PM1/27/2023 9:46:30 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Trigonium_M    Medium 692 KB 1/27/2023 4:29 PM Bigler, Abbey (NIH/NIGMS) [C Br><Br> Would be the label-free image of STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspxhttps://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{813B5CCA-A3DC-4553-A6D3-917677670EC4}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
696416687A crawling cell with DNA shown in blue and actin filaments, which are a major component of the cytoskeleton, visible in pink. Actin filaments help enable cells to crawl. This image was captured using structured illumination microscopy.1/27/2023 9:48:17 PM1/27/2023 9:48:17 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified A Crawling Cell_M    Medium 1083 KB 1/27/2023 4:43 PM Bigler, Abbey (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspxhttps://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{B0CB22F5-BFDF-4E5B-97FE-A9FB7D7C137E}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
696516688As this cell was undergoing cell division, it was imaged with two microscopy techniques: differential interference contrast (DIC) and confocal. The DIC view appears in blue and shows the entire cell. The confocal view appears in pink and shows the chromosomes.1/27/2023 9:51:37 PM1/27/2023 9:51:37 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Dividing Cell Thumbnail    Thumbnail 1228 KB 1/27/2023 4:52 PM Bigler, Abbey (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspxhttps://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{FD155F42-CC19-4293-8141-5746A83D8D7B}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
696638989Melanoma (skin cancer) cells undergoing programmed cell death, also called apoptosis. This process was triggered by raising the pH of the medium that the cells were growing in. Melanoma in people cannot be treated by raising pH because that would also kill healthy cells. This video was taken using a differential interference contrast (DIC) microscope.1/27/2023 9:56:19 PM1/27/2023 9:56:19 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Dying Melanoma Cells Thumbnail    Thumbnail 807 KB 1/27/2023 4:57 PM Bigler, Abbey (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspxhttps://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{32C38EFA-6963-4195-A8F8-4F202F6EA448}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
696739002A cancer cell with three nuclei, shown in light blue. The abnormal number of nuclei indicates that the cell failed to go through cell division, probably more than once. Mitochondria are shown in yellow, and a protein of the cell’s cytoskeleton appears in red. This video was captured using a confocal microscope.1/27/2023 10:01:59 PM1/27/2023 10:01:59 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Multinucleated Cell Thumbnail    Thumbnail 933 KB 1/27/2023 5:03 PM Bigler, Abbey (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspxhttps://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{64431FF1-3ED5-4170-A4F8-BC1E736586B3}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2418377This delicate, birdlike projection is an immature seed of the <i>Arabidopsis</i> plant. The part in blue shows the cell that gives rise to the endosperm, the tissue that nourishes the embryo. The cell is expressing only the maternal copy of a gene called MEDEA. This phenomenon, in which the activity of a gene can depend on the parent that contributed it, is called genetic imprinting. In <i>Arabidopsis</i>, the maternal copy of MEDEA makes a protein that keeps the paternal copy silent and reduces the size of the endosperm. In flowering plants and mammals, this sort of genetic imprinting is thought to be a way for the mother to protect herself by limiting the resources she gives to any one embryo. Featured in the May 16, 2006, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/06-05-16/#1 target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.8/17/2020 7:59:57 PM8/17/2020 7:59:57 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified genetic_imprinting_T    Thumbnail 4 KB 6/3/2016 3:10 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C In flowering plants and mammals, this sort of genetic imprinting is thought to be a way for STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{755171FE-A0AC-4D55-8F76-BC6554F6076A}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2419378This image of the human brain uses colors and shapes to show neurological differences between two people. The blurred front portion of the brain, associated with complex thought, varies most between the individuals. The blue ovals mark areas of basic function that vary relatively little. Visualizations like this one are part of a project to map complex and dynamic information about the human brain, including genes, enzymes, disease states, and anatomy. The brain maps represent collaborations between neuroscientists and experts in math, statistics, computer science, bioinformatics, imaging, and nanotechnology. Featured in the October 18, 2005, issue of <a href="http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/05-10-18/#1" target="_blank"><em>Biomedical Beat</em></a>.5/12/2021 8:58:25 PM5/12/2021 8:58:25 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Brain_map_M    Medium 67 KB 6/3/2016 3:10 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C This image of the human brain uses STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{B082809A-5B3D-4BD2-B182-2FFDA2EBAE5B}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2423379Network diagram showing a map of protein-protein interactions in a yeast (<i>Saccharomyces cerevisiae</i>) cell. This cluster includes 78 percent of the proteins in the yeast proteome. The color of a node represents the phenotypic effect of removing the corresponding protein (red, lethal; green, nonlethal; orange, slow growth; yellow, unknown).8/17/2020 9:20:50 PM8/17/2020 9:20:50 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified protein_map182_T    Thumbnail 10 KB 6/3/2016 3:10 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C I'm more than happy to allow STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{F93DC033-4F3F-4368-8211-AD3F2769B90F}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6519388During cell division, cells physically divide after separating their genetic material to create two daughter cells that are genetically identical to the parent cell. This process is important so that new cells can grow and develop. In this image, a human fibroblast cell—a type of connective tissue cell that plays a key role in wound healing and tissue repair—is dividing into two daughter cells. A cell protein called actin appears gray, the myosin II (part of the family of motor proteins responsible for muscle contractions) appears green, and DNA appears magenta. 12/22/2020 4:11:34 PM12/22/2020 4:11:34 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Fibroblast Division_HIghRes    High 3066 KB 11/6/2019 10:20 AM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{D58E532F-7578-4EC5-8E98-64840654F119}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6520389Here, a human HeLa cell (a type of immortal cell line used in laboratory experiments) is undergoing cell division. They come from cervical cancer cells that were obtained in 1951 from Henrietta Lacks, a patient at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. The final stage of division, called cytokinesis, occurs after the genomes—shown in yellow—have split into two new daughter cells. The myosin II is a motor protein shown in blue, and the actin filaments, which are types of protein that support cell structure, are shown in red. Read more about <a href="https://directorsblog.nih.gov/2013/08/07/hela-cells-a-new-chapter-in-an-enduring-story/">NIH and the Lacks family</a>.12/21/2020 7:39:25 PM12/21/2020 7:39:25 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Read more about <a href="https://directorsblog.nih.gov/2013/08/07/hela-cells-a-new-chapter-in-an-enduring-story STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{BE87B9BE-366C-4432-8538-8F3B807C2AE0}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6521390This skyline of New York City was created by “printing” nanodroplets containing yeast (<i>Saccharomyces cerevisiae</i>) onto a large plate. Each dot is a separate yeast colony. As the colonies grew, a picture emerged, creating art. To make the different colors shown here, yeast strains were genetically engineered to produce pigments naturally made by bacteria, fungi, and sea creatures such as coral and sea anemones. Using genes from other organisms to make biological compounds paves the way toward harnessing yeast in the production of other useful molecules, from food to fuels and drugs.12/22/2020 4:10:18 PM12/22/2020 4:10:18 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified NYC Skyline, FASEB winner_HIghRes    High 2636 KB 11/6/2019 10:14 AM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{7761567D-1F40-428F-B2A5-DC64D0AEB797}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6522391In this image of a stained fruit fly ovary, the ovary is packed with immature eggs (with DNA stained blue). The cytoskeleton (in pink) is a collection of fibers that gives a cell shape and support. The signal-transmitting molecules like STAT (in yellow) are common to reproductive processes in humans. Researchers used this image to show molecular staining and high-resolution imaging techniques to students.12/22/2020 4:09:49 PM12/22/2020 4:09:49 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Fly ovaries-1_STAT-Actin-DAPI-Rogers1-option 1_M    Medium 112 KB 10/30/2019 10:01 AM Varkala, Venkat (NIH STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{5962F18A-BC93-49A3-8D72-59B68D5AD8DE}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6532392In the worm <i>C. elegans</i>, double-stranded RNA made in neurons can silence matching genes in a variety of cell types through the transport of RNA between cells. The head region of three worms that were genetically modified to express a fluorescent protein were imaged and the images were color-coded based on depth. The worm on the left lacks neuronal double-stranded RNA and thus every cell is fluorescent. In the middle worm, the expression of the fluorescent protein is silenced by neuronal double-stranded RNA and thus most cells are not fluorescent. The worm on the right lacks an enzyme that amplifies RNA for silencing. Surprisingly, the identities of the cells that depend on this enzyme for gene silencing are unpredictable. As a result, worms of identical genotype are nevertheless random mosaics for how the function of gene silencing is carried out. For more, see <a href="https://academic.oup.com/nar/article/47/19/10059/5563947">journal article</a> and <a href="https://umdrightnow.umd.edu/news/umd-scientists-discover-hidden-differences-may-help-cells-evade-drug-therapy">press release.</a> Related to image <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6534">6534</a>.12/21/2020 7:45:16 PM12/21/2020 7:45:16 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified The_Three_Pharingos_4_flipped_Thumbnail    Thumbnail 94 KB 12/17/2019 2:28 PM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{818BAE61-BA6A-412E-9A1A-F5BEE4D08EA6}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6534393In the worm <i>C. elegans</i>, double-stranded RNA made in neurons can silence matching genes in a variety of cell types through the transport of RNA between cells. The head region of three worms that were genetically modified to express a fluorescent protein were imaged and the images were color-coded based on depth. The worm on the left lacks neuronal double-stranded RNA and thus every cell is fluorescent. In the middle worm, the expression of the fluorescent protein is silenced by neuronal double-stranded RNA and thus most cells are not fluorescent. The worm on the right lacks an enzyme that amplifies RNA for silencing. Surprisingly, the identities of the cells that depend on this enzyme for gene silencing are unpredictable. As a result, worms of identical genotype are nevertheless random mosaics for how the function of gene silencing is carried out. For more, see <a href="https://academic.oup.com/nar/article/47/19/10059/5563947">journal article</a> and <a href="https://umdrightnow.umd.edu/news/umd-scientists-discover-hidden-differences-may-help-cells-evade-drug-therapy">press release.</a> Related to image <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6532">6532</a>.12/21/2020 7:47:07 PM12/21/2020 7:47:07 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified The_Three_Pharingos_16colored_Thumbnail    Thumbnail 91 KB 12/17/2019 2:58 PM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{41A91E05-BA3D-46C3-9B56-0838552A4F30}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6535394Kupffer cells appear in the liver during the early stages of mammalian development and stay put throughout life to protect liver cells, clean up old red blood cells, and regulate iron levels. Source article <a href="https://directorsblog.nih.gov/2019/12/12/replenishing-the-livers-immune-protections/">Replenishing the Liver’s Immune Protections</a>. Posted on December 12th, 2019 by Dr. Francis Collins.12/21/2020 7:51:16 PM12/21/2020 7:51:16 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Kupffer_cell_in_liver-1_NCMIR_thumbnail    Thumbnail 118 KB 12/18/2019 1:38 PM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{3A1E4A5A-E2A1-4267-A145-D69C64F52A7A}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2434396Section of a fruit fly retina showing the light-sensing molecules rhodopsin-5 (blue) and rhodopsin-6 (red).8/18/2020 9:34:37 PM8/18/2020 9:34:37 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Fruit_fly_retina_2    High 92 KB 6/3/2016 3:11 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{76D06FB1-3EF4-4960-ADE3-3B9AA3122948}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2435397The glial cells (black dots) and nerve cells (brown bands) in this developing fruit fly nerve cord formed normally despite the absence of the SPITZ protein, which blocks their impending suicide. The HID protein, which triggers suicide, is also lacking in this embryo.8/19/2020 4:24:57 PM8/19/2020 4:24:57 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Developing_fruit_fly_nerve_cord_M    Medium 12 KB 6/3/2016 3:11 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{DF2ABB73-C6AA-445B-9DE5-B16A7830BDE9}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2437398<i>Hydra magnipapillata</i> is an invertebrate animal used as a model organism to study developmental questions, for example the formation of the body axis.8/11/2022 11:56:55 PM8/11/2022 11:56:55 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified D20_2920-2_M    Medium 192 KB 6/3/2016 3:11 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C I sent the images for that purpose STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{726F855D-7FB8-461A-B0E6-151F3FDBCD2B}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2438399<i>Hydra magnipapillata</i> is an invertebrate animal used as a model organism to study developmental questions, for example the formation of the body axis.8/19/2020 2:57:58 PM8/19/2020 2:57:58 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified D20_2921-2    High 1545 KB 6/3/2016 3:11 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C I sent the images for that purpose STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{6730514F-C4E7-47BE-9D58-176F790A5EED}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2439400<i>Hydra magnipapillata</i> is an invertebrate animal used as a model organism to study developmental questions, for example the formation of the body axis.8/19/2020 2:56:50 PM8/19/2020 2:56:50 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified D20_2925-2_L    Low 54 KB 6/3/2016 3:11 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C I sent the images for that purpose STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{3E508158-607A-4F26-8ABD-D1325D56C6FC}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2440401<i>Hydra magnipapillata</i> is an invertebrate animal used as a model organism to study developmental questions, for example the formation of the body axis.8/19/2020 2:54:54 PM8/19/2020 2:54:54 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified D20_2927-2    High 1343 KB 6/3/2016 3:11 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C I sent the images for that purpose STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{81E5497C-2A45-458C-9236-23A11648E56E}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2441402<i>Hydra magnipapillata</i> is an invertebrate animal used as a model organism to study developmental questions, for example the formation of the body axis.7/20/2021 2:20:35 PM7/20/2021 2:20:35 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified D20_2931-2    High 416 KB 6/3/2016 3:11 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C I sent the images for that purpose STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{DA359322-34AC-40B3-98FF-849B276875E9}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2442403<i>Hydra magnipapillata</i> is an invertebrate animal used as a model organism to study developmental questions, for example the formation of the body axis.8/19/2020 2:52:08 PM8/19/2020 2:52:08 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified D20_2932-2    High 588 KB 6/3/2016 3:11 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C I sent the images for that purpose STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{AFEC3CCF-4521-4FBE-B588-7EF06ED5D31B}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3432404Shortly after a pregnant woman gives birth, her breasts start to secrete milk. This process is triggered by hormonal and genetic cues, including the protein Elf5. Scientists discovered that Elf5 also has another job--it staves off cancer. Early in the development of breast cancer, human breast cells often lose Elf5 proteins. Cells without Elf5 change shape and spread readily--properties associated with metastasis. This image shows cells in the mouse mammary gland that are lacking Elf5, leading to the overproduction of other proteins (red) that increase the likelihood of metastasis.8/22/2020 4:13:22 PM8/22/2020 4:13:22 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Rumela_300dpi    Other 12314 KB 9/26/2020 10:32 PM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{21A2AB31-1A11-45C6-9FDA-9C8EF7162120}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3434405Influenza (flu) virus proteins in the act of self-replication. Viral nucleoprotein (blue) encapsidates [encapsulates] the RNA genome (green). The influenza virus polymerase (orange) reads and copies the RNA genome. In the background is an image of influenza virus ribonucleoprotein complexes observed using cryo-electron microscopy. This image is from a November 2012 <a href=http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2012-11/sri-sri112012.php target="blank"> <em>News Release</em></a>.8/22/2020 4:28:48 PM8/22/2020 4:28:48 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Flu_virus_proteins__M    Medium 111 KB 6/3/2016 3:29 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{77F0053D-8191-4175-9D50-055CE49F083C}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3440409During embryonic development, transcription factors (proteins that regulate gene expression) govern the differentiation of cells into separate tissues and organs. Researchers at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center used mice to study the development of certain internal organs, including the liver, pancreas, duodenum (beginning part of the small intestine), gall bladder and bile ducts. They discovered that transcription factor Sox17 guides some cells to develop into liver cells and others to become part of the pancreas or biliary system (gall bladder, bile ducts and associated structures). The separation of these two distinct cell types (liver versus pancreas/biliary system) is complete by embryonic day 8.5 in mice. The transcription factors PDX1 and Hes1 are also known to be involved in embryonic development of the pancreas and biliary system. This image shows mouse cells at embryonic day 10.5. The green areas show cells that will develop into the pancreas and/or duodenum(PDX1 is labeled green). The blue area near the bottom will become the gall bladder and the connecting tubes (common duct and cystic duct) that attach the gall bladder to the liver and pancreas (Sox17 is labeled blue). The transcription factor Hes1 is labeled red. The image was not published. A similar image (different plane of the section) was published in: <b>Sox17 Regulates Organ Lineage Segregation of Ventral Foregut Progenitor Cells</b> Jason R. Spence, Alex W. Lange, Suh-Chin J. Lin, Klaus H. Kaestner, Andrew M. Lowy, Injune Kim, Jeffrey A. Whitsett and James M. Wells, Developmental Cell, Volume 17, Issue 1, 62-74, 21 July 2009. doi:10.1016/j.devcel.2009.05.0128/22/2020 5:03:27 PM8/22/2020 5:03:27 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified e10-5_sox_hes_pdx    Other 26400 KB 9/26/2020 10:34 PM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C If so, and if it?s not STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{82850322-6E67-4E74-9AB5-AA92C974E1F0}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3442410These images show three stages of cell division in Xenopus XL177 cells, which are derived from tadpole epithelial cells. They are (from top): metaphase, anaphase and telophase. The microtubules are green and the chromosomes are blue. Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3443">image 3443</a>.8/22/2020 5:25:02 PM8/22/2020 5:25:02 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified mitotic1_M    Medium 94 KB 6/3/2016 3:29 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C These images show three stages of cell division in Xenopus XL177 cells, which are derived from tadpole STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{385F83B3-C956-487B-9A75-4C353F0A940E}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3443411These images show frog cells in interphase. The cells are Xenopus XL177 cells, which are derived from tadpole epithelial cells. The microtubules are green and the chromosomes are blue. Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3442">image 3442</a>.8/22/2020 5:30:27 PM8/22/2020 5:30:27 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified interphs_M    Medium 225 KB 6/3/2016 3:29 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C The microtubules are green and the STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{5CE69473-3A28-4887-B8C1-AA71A16B23A9}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6553413Floral pattern emerging as two bacterial species, motile <i>Acinetobacter baylyi</i> (red) and non-motile <i>Escherichia coli</i> (green), are grown together for 48 hours on 1% agar surface from a small inoculum in the center of a Petri dish. <br><br> See <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6557">6557</a> for a photo of this process at 24 hours on 0.75% agar surface. <br> See <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6555">6555</a> for another photo of this process at 48 hours on 1% agar surface. <br> See <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6556">6556</a> for a photo of this process at 72 hours on 0.5% agar surface.<br> See <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6550">6550</a> for a video of this process.12/21/2020 8:13:21 PM12/21/2020 8:13:21 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified v_1200_LowRes    Low 108 KB 3/23/2020 10:52 AM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C Floral pattern in a mixture of STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{6856F041-1361-4783-9B60-D14068A564E4}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6555414Floral pattern emerging as two bacterial species, motile <i>Acinetobacter baylyi</i> (red) and non-motile <i>Escherichia coli</i> (green), are grown together for 48 hours on 1% agar surface from a small inoculum in the center of a Petri dish. <br><br> See <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6557">6557</a> for a photo of this process at 24 hours on 0.75% agar surface. <br> See <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6553">6553</a> for another photo of this process at 48 hours on 1% agar surface. <br> See <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6556">6556</a> for a photo of this process at 72 hours on 0.5% agar surface. <br> See <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6550">6550</a> for a video of this process.12/21/2020 8:15:42 PM12/21/2020 8:15:42 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified AnEspec2a_Thumb    Thumbnail 80 KB 3/23/2020 11:04 AM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{53BB1AC9-C210-41F3-AFCE-D486FB2F4E8D}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6556415Floral pattern emerging as two bacterial species, motile <i>Acinetobacter baylyi</i> and non-motile <i>Escherichia coli</i> (green), are grown together for 72 hours on 0.5% agar surface from a small inoculum in the center of a Petri dish. <br><br> See <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6557">6557</a> for a photo of this process at 24 hours on 0.75% agar surface. <br> See <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6553">6553</a> for a photo of this process at 48 hours on 1% agar surface. <br> See <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6555">6555</a> for another photo of this process at 48 hours on 1% agar surface.<br> See <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6550">6550</a> for a video of this process.12/21/2020 8:20:40 PM12/21/2020 8:20:40 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Fig1A_Thumb    Thumbnail 133 KB 3/23/2020 11:18 AM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C L. Xiong et al, eLife 2020;9 STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{650BA99B-A3DA-470B-AE76-FF69E44D891B}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6557416Floral pattern emerging as two bacterial species, motile <i>Acinetobacter baylyi</i> and non-motile <i>Escherichia coli</i> (green), are grown together for 24 hours on 0.75% agar surface from a small inoculum in the center of a Petri dish. <br><br> See <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6553">6553</a> for a photo of this process at 48 hours on 1% agar surface. <br> See <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6555">6555</a> for another photo of this process at 48 hours on 1% agar surface.<br> See <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6556">6556</a> for a photo of this process at 72 hours on 0.5% agar surface. <br> See <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6550">6550</a> for a video of this process.12/21/2020 8:21:34 PM12/21/2020 8:21:34 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Q1190217rgb1_Thumb    Thumbnail 98 KB 3/23/2020 11:50 AM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{5C7A3D81-578C-4736-A690-6B71A7F2C2B4}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
65694193D image of <i>Caulobacter</i> bacterium with various components highlighted: cell membranes (red and blue), protein shell (green), protein factories known as ribosomes (yellow), and storage granules (orange). 12/22/2020 3:22:13 PM12/22/2020 3:22:13 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified cryo_em_caulobacter_thumb    Thumbnail 46 KB 7/16/2020 4:42 PM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{1F5C58D5-5216-4E76-AE82-A401F16B64DB}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2457420Novel biosensor system maps the timing and location of Rac protein activation in a living mouse embryo fibroblast.8/20/2020 6:22:04 PM8/20/2020 6:22:04 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified RAC1_activation_in_motile_fibroblast    High 627 KB 6/28/2016 3:00 PM Hall, Monique (NIH/NCI) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{B0808E7F-84F4-4D3E-A355-D7F70A509103}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2473421Sugars light up the cells in this jaw of a 3-day-old zebrafish embryo and highlight a scientific first: labeling and tracking the movements of sugar chains called glycans in a living organism. Here, recently produced glycans (red) are on the cell surface while those made earlier in development (green) have migrated into the cells. In some areas, old and new glycans mingle (yellow). A better understanding of such traffic patterns could shed light on how organisms develop and may uncover markers for disease, such as cancer. Featured in the May 21, 2008 of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/08-05-21/index.html#1 target="_blank"><i>Biomedical Beat</i></a>.8/21/2020 9:08:18 PM8/21/2020 9:08:18 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified glowing_glycan_S    Low 32 KB 9/13/2016 4:09 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C Sugars light up the cells in STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{B91060A2-F13B-4A09-BD5C-3BE494CB9E7B}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2489427T cells engulf and digest cells displaying markers (or antigens) for retroviruses, such as HIV.9/18/2020 5:14:52 PM9/18/2020 5:14:52 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified retrovirus_unlabeled_low    Low 104 KB 6/3/2016 3:12 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{9B49DCF9-CB59-4B8A-88FF-CF3FEE82D6AA}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3444428Taste buds in a circumvallate papilla in a mouse tongue with types I, II and III taste cells visualized by cell-type-specific fluorescent antibodies. Type II cells respond to sweet, bitter, and umami tastes by signaling to the central nervous system by non-vesicular ATP release. Taruno and colleagues have identified CALHM1 as a voltage-gated ATP release channel that mediates this response to these taste modalities. The work was published in Nature (14 March 2013) and supported in part by the National Institutes of Health (GM56328, MH059937, NS072775, DC10393, EY13624, R03DC011143, P30 EY001583, P30DC011735). A news release about the work can be read <a href=http://www.uphs.upenn.edu/news/news_releases/2013/03/foskett/ target="blank"> <em>here.</em></a>8/22/2020 5:35:10 PM8/22/2020 5:35:10 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified foskett_large_from_U_Penn_release_March_2013_L    Low 70 KB 6/3/2016 3:29 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{C8D703EF-7E6B-4466-9FF5-949FD17DDCAF}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3445429This image of a mammalian epithelial cell, captured in metaphase, was the winning image in the high- and super-resolution microscopy category of the 2012 GE Healthcare Life Sciences Cell Imaging Competition. The image shows microtubules (red), kinetochores (green) and DNA (blue). The DNA is fixed in the process of being moved along the microtubules that form the structure of the spindle. The image was taken using the DeltaVision OMX imaging system, affectionately known as the "OMG" microscope, and was displayed on the NBC screen in New York's Times Square during the weekend of April 20-21, 2013. More information about the image is in a <em><a href="http://newsinfo.iu.edu/news/page/normal/23885.html">news release</a></em> from Indiana University and a NIH Director's <em><a href="http://directorsblog.nih.gov/omg-microscope-lives-up-to-its-name/">blog post</a></em>. This image is part of the Life: Magnified collection, which was displayed in the Gateway Gallery at Washington Dulles International Airport June 3, 2014, to January 21, 2015. To see all 46 images in this exhibit, go to https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/life-magnified/Pages/default.aspx.11/22/2022 7:47:14 PM11/22/2022 7:47:14 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 20120731_29_004_JSTOUT_S    Low 13 KB 8/30/2016 12:43 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{05E778D9-EC50-4DE0-B522-B3B83DC89C36}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3446430This time-lapse movie shows that bacterial communities called biofilms can create blockages that prevent fluid flow in devices such as stents and catheters over a period of about 56 hours. This video was featured in a <em><a href="http://blogs.princeton.edu/research/2013/03/01/how-do-bacteria-clog-medical-devices-very-quickly-pnas/">news release</a></em> from Princeton University.8/22/2020 6:23:17 PM8/22/2020 6:23:17 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 3446_Biofilm_blocking_fluid_flow_S    Low 54 KB 3/28/2019 4:22 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{53A0EAAA-D19E-480B-97FE-504A8F95D7BF}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3449432Living primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Mitochondria (green) stained with the mitochondrial membrane potential indicator, rhodamine 123. Nuclei (blue) are stained with DAPI. Caption from a November 26, 2012 <a href= "http://www.uphs.upenn.edu/news/News_Releases/2012/11/energy/">news release </a> from U Penn (Penn Medicine).8/22/2020 6:35:39 PM8/22/2020 6:35:39 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified From: Kevin Foskett [mailto:foskett@mail.med.upenn.edu] Sent: Wednesday, May 15, 2013 11:14 AM To: Kreeger, Karen Subject: Re: Permission from NIGMS STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{B8716C1C-A233-4176-8164-F8FDF7922338}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3451433This fruit fly spermatid recycles various molecules, including malformed or damaged proteins. Actin filaments (red) in the cell draw unwanted proteins toward a barrel-shaped structure called the proteasome (green clusters), which degrades the molecules into their basic parts for re-use. Featured in the May 16, 2013, issue of <em><a href="http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/#1">Biomedical Beat</a></em>.5/25/2021 4:00:45 PM5/25/2021 4:00:45 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Steller_fruit_fly_spermatid    High 82 KB 6/3/2016 3:29 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{DAFD527E-15B8-4CAD-8F90-0E93542E5697}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3371443The cerebellum is the brain's locomotion control center. Every time you shoot a basketball, tie your shoe or chop an onion, your cerebellum fires into action. Found at the base of your brain, the cerebellum is a single layer of tissue with deep folds like an accordion. People with damage to this region of the brain often have difficulty with balance, coordination and fine motor skills. For a lower magnification, see image 3370. This image is part of the Life: Magnified collection, which was displayed in the Gateway Gallery at Washington Dulles International Airport June 3, 2014, to January 21, 2015. To see all 46 images in this exhibit, go to https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/life-magnified/Pages/default.aspx.11/22/2022 7:05:01 PM11/22/2022 7:05:01 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified NCMIR_cerebellum_zoom_S    Low 21 KB 9/14/2016 11:40 AM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{FB8E30FA-4B5D-4CC2-B17A-8B480C9F0F3F}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3386446The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV),shown here as tiny purple spheres, causes the disease known as AIDS (for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome). HIV can infect multiple cells in your body, including brain cells, but its main target is a cell in the immune system called the CD4 lymphocyte (also called a T-cell or CD4 cell).12/23/2020 8:03:30 PM12/23/2020 8:03:30 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified NCMIR_HIV_infected_cell_L    Low 24 KB 6/3/2016 3:27 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{3D7073C8-3290-4F3B-9B48-714CBFC2BE59}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3387447Spinal nerves are part of the peripheral nervous system. They run within the spinal column to carry nerve signals to and from all parts of the body. The spinal nerves enable all the movements we do, from turning our heads to wiggling our toes, control the movements of our internal organs, such as the colon and the bladder, as well as allow us to feel touch and location of our limbs.12/23/2020 8:04:47 PM12/23/2020 8:04:47 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified NCMIR_human_spinal_nerve_L    Low 30 KB 6/3/2016 3:27 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{64E261D1-CBF3-4145-AB2D-8F5C90A18B68}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3389448The small intestine is where most of our nutrients from the food we eat are absorbed into the bloodstream. The walls of the intestine contain small finger-like projections called villi which increase the organ's surface area, enhancing nutrient absorption. It consists of the duodenum, which connects to the stomach, the jejenum and the ileum, which connects with the large intestine. Related to <a href="http://images.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3389" target=_blank>image 3390</a> .10/14/2020 8:45:49 PM10/14/2020 8:45:49 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified NCMIR_intestine-1_L    Low 39 KB 6/3/2016 3:27 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C The small intestine is where most STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{49CE5FB2-46F4-4727-845D-4F0A2269E7EB}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
3390449The small intestine is where most of our nutrients from the food we eat are absorbed into the bloodstream. The walls of the intestine contain small finger-like projections called villi which increase the organ's surface area, enhancing nutrient absorption. It consists of the duodenum, which connects to the stomach, the jejenum and the ileum, which connects with the large intestine. Related to <a href="http://images.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3389" target=_blank>image 3389</a> .12/23/2020 8:05:19 PM12/23/2020 8:05:19 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified NCMIR_intestine-2_L    Low 28 KB 6/3/2016 3:28 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C The small intestine is where most STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{A08D409D-7110-489B-8548-C499D3A28774}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6503455This image capture shows how a single gene, STM, plays a starring role in plant development. This gene acts like a molecular fountain of youth, keeping cells ever-young until it’s time to grow up and commit to making flowers and other plant parts. Because of its ease of use and low cost, <i>Arabidopsis</i> is a favorite model for scientists to learn the basic principles driving tissue growth and regrowth for humans as well as the beautiful plants outside your window. Image captured from video Watch Flowers Spring to Life, featured in the <a href="https://directorsblog.nih.gov/2019/04/25/watch-flowers-spring-to-life/">NIH Director's Blog: Watch Flowers Spring to Life.</a> 10/7/2021 5:50:16 PM10/7/2021 5:50:16 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified HIRES-Flower formation Elliot Meyerowitz2019    High 1063 KB 4/26/2019 8:58 AM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{7E5FE5A7-F34F-4777-97B6-494D62714E16}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6518457A biofilm is a highly organized community of microorganisms that develops naturally on certain surfaces. These communities are common in natural environments and generally do not pose any danger to humans. Many microbes in biofilms have a positive impact on the planet and our societies. Biofilms can be helpful in treatment of wastewater, for example. This dime-sized biofilm, however, was formed by the opportunistic pathogen <i>Pseudomonas aeruginosa</i>. Under some conditions, this bacterium can infect wounds that are caused by severe burns. The bacterial cells release a variety of materials to form an extracellular matrix, which is stained red in this photograph. The matrix holds the biofilm together and protects the bacteria from antibiotics and the immune system.12/22/2020 4:12:00 PM12/22/2020 4:12:00 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Scott Chimileski 2_PA_4K_LowRes    Low 203 KB 11/6/2019 10:45 AM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{05866BCD-AA36-451D-B663-DD14120ED9DE}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2425458Influenza A infects a host cell when hemagglutinin grips onto glycans on its surface. Neuraminidase, an enzyme that chews sugars, helps newly made virus particles detach so they can infect other cells. Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=2505">image 2505</a>. Featured in the March 2006, issue of <a href=http://www.nigms.nih.gov/Publications/Findings.htm target="_blank"><I>Findings</i></a> in "Viral Voyages."2/5/2020 4:07:20 PM2/5/2020 4:07:20 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Influenza_Virus_S    Low 76 KB 8/24/2016 3:35 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{C6EF752E-ED4B-44D9-83F0-1612EBC81110}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
2428460Actin (purple), microtubules (yellow), and nuclei (green) are labeled in these cells by immunofluorescence. This image won first place in the Nikon 2003 Small World photo competition.8/17/2020 9:33:48 PM8/17/2020 9:33:48 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Wittmann1_S    Low 88 KB 9/7/2016 3:02 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{7B30D101-F2A2-4554-87B0-71C2FC1D3774}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131