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65695873D image of <i>Caulobacter</i> bacterium with various components highlighted: cell membranes (red and blue), protein shell (green), protein factories known as ribosomes (yellow), and storage granules (orange). 12/22/2020 3:22:13 PM12/22/2020 3:22:13 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified cryo_em_caulobacter_thumb    Thumbnail 46 KB 7/16/2020 4:42 PM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{1F5C58D5-5216-4E76-AE82-A401F16B64DB}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6597599Learn about the differences between bacteria and viruses, how they each can make you sick, and how they can or cannot be treated. Discover more resources from NIGMS’ <a href="https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/pathways/Pages/Home.aspx">Pathways</a> collaboration with Scholastic. View the <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hTWUV6azGXE">video<img src="https://www.nigms.nih.gov/PublishingImages/exitdisclaimer.gif" alt="Link to external web site" style="border-width: 0px;"/></a> on YouTube for closed captioning.12/4/2020 3:04:13 PM12/4/2020 3:04:13 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Pathways_ Bacteria vs. Viruses_ What's the Difference_    High 15387 KB 12/3/2020 5:32 PM Walter, Taylor STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{23CEE978-991E-450B-85A0-CA5B3F326EAC}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
6661881A zebrafish embryo. The blue areas are cell bodies, the green lines are blood vessels, and the red glow is blood. This image was created by stitching together five individual images captured with a hyperspectral multipoint confocal fluorescence microscope that was developed at the Eliceiri Lab.3/15/2021 2:12:24 PM3/15/2021 2:12:24 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified stiched_fish_blending_high_contrast_S    Low 44 KB 3/10/2021 10:29 AM Walter, Taylor (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{21EB81A4-AD8F-40BD-8CD3-E868067E9D30}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
67481029A replica of a human retina grown from stem cells. It shows rod photoreceptors (nerve cells responsible for dark vision) in green and red/green cones (nerve cells responsible for red and green color vision) in red. The cell nuclei are stained blue. This image was captured using a confocal microscope.3/18/2021 2:46:22 PM3/18/2021 2:46:22 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified PRs retinal organoid og_large_S    Low 67 KB 3/18/2021 10:39 AM Walter, Taylor (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{7745E02E-83F3-4FCE-A6AA-6A8FD7660CB1}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
65981082When we walk, muscles and nerves interact in intricate ways. This simulation, which is based on data from a six-foot-tall man, shows these interactions.1/28/2021 8:07:12 PM1/28/2021 8:07:12 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Simulation of Leg Muscles Moving    Medium 2554 KB 12/10/2020 5:35 PM Walter, Taylor (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{FE1C4F82-744B-4AC6-B161-DAAA9406C8B4}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
66012695This animation shows atoms of the HIV capsid, the shell that encloses the virus's genetic material. Scientists determined the exact structure of the capsid using a variety of imaging techniques and analyses. They then entered this data into a supercomputer to produce this image. Learn more in the <a href="https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/pages/Factsheet_StructuralBiology.aspx"> structural biology fact sheet</a>. Related to image <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=3477">3477</a>. 1/28/2021 8:06:44 PM1/28/2021 8:06:44 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Atomic-Level Structure of the HIV Capsid    High 20229 KB 12/10/2020 5:41 PM Walter, Taylor (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{2C77B30F-B214-4301-B475-E0433A651C12}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
66023454This animation shows the effect of exposure to hypochlorous acid, which is found in certain types of immune cells, on bacterial proteins. The proteins unfold and stick to one another, leading to cell death.1/27/2021 5:36:42 PM1/27/2021 5:36:42 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified See How Immune Cell Acid Destroys Bacterial Proteins    High 733 KB 12/10/2020 5:39 PM Walter, Taylor (NIH STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{36A1D7A0-A59C-4B65-8A44-9F5A48B0FCD6}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
67504797These microscopic roundworms, called <i>Caenorhabditis elegans</i>, lack eyes and the opsin proteins used by visual systems to detect colors. However, researchers found that the worms can still sense the color of light in a way that enables them to avoid pigmented toxins made by bacteria. This image was captured using a stereo microscope.3/24/2021 5:44:57 PM3/24/2021 5:44:57 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Ghosh et al_SciPak multimedia 1_2.24.2021_M    Medium 42 KB 3/24/2021 11:16 AM Walter, Taylor (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{760D483D-C76B-4606-BCD1-4887E3807BC8}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
67534855Across many animals, the egg cell develops alongside sister cells. In the fruit fly (<i>Drosophila melanogaster</i>) these sister cells are called nurse cells, and their job is to “nurse” an immature egg cell, or oocyte. Toward the end of oocyte development, the nurse cells transfer all their contents into the oocyte in a process called “nurse cell dumping.” This process involves significant shape deformations on the part of the nurse cells (blue), which are powered by wavelike myosin activity (red). This image was captured using a laser scanning confocal microscope. Related to video <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6754">6754</a>.3/25/2021 8:45:16 PM3/25/2021 8:45:16 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified fruit fly nurse cell_rs_S    Low 8 KB 3/25/2021 4:46 PM Walter, Taylor (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{F11F0E4B-676C-45D6-B4EB-694558674C39}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
67544905Across many animals, the egg cell develops alongside sister cells. In the fruit fly (<i>Drosophila melanogaster</i>) these sister cells are called nurse cells, and their job is to “nurse” an immature egg cell, or oocyte. Toward the end of oocyte development, the nurse cells transfer all their contents into the oocyte in a process called “nurse cell dumping.” This process involves significant shape deformations on the part of the nurse cells (blue), which are powered by wavelike myosin activity (red). This video captures the nurse cells amid transport; it was created using a laser scanning confocal microscope. Related to image <a href="https://images.nigms.nih.gov/pages/DetailPage.aspx?imageid2=6753">6753</a>.3/24/2021 6:06:41 PM3/24/2021 6:06:41 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Fruit fly nurse cell video (1)    High 23777 KB 3/25/2021 4:51 PM Walter, Taylor (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{832C5196-E92F-48A5-B7CD-AF878621F7A3}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
66055018A color-coded, 3D model of a rat pancreatic β cell. This type of cell produces insulin, a hormone that helps regulate blood sugar. Visible are mitochondria (pink), insulin vesicles (yellow), the nucleus (dark blue), and the plasma membrane (teal). This model was created based on soft X-ray tomography (SXT) images.2/2/2021 4:31:05 PM2/2/2021 4:31:05 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified SXT cell_mod_1280px teal_M    Medium 140 KB 2/2/2021 11:31 AM Walter, Taylor (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{AB7FAF26-00F2-4B88-BA6C-F9BB30B08BA7}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
252315223The plasma membrane is a cell's protective barrier Featured in <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/chemhealth/ target="_blank"><i>The Chemistry of Health</i></a>.10/2/2020 2:09:53 PM10/2/2020 2:09:53 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Plasma_Membrane_S    Low 81 KB 8/24/2016 3:47 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{B0AD4B41-3B4D-41DE-A541-77D481EAC9FD}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
252415224The plasma membrane is a cell's protective barrier. Featured in <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/chemhealth/ target="_blank"><i>The Chemistry of Health</i></a>.10/2/2020 2:11:15 PM10/2/2020 2:11:15 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Plasma_Membrane_with_labels_S    Low 91 KB 8/24/2016 3:49 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{4324C042-20D9-4AA0-9FE1-2BE344F10E3C}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
349815228Wound healing requires the action of stem cells. In mice that lack the Sept2/ARTS gene, stem cells involved in wound healing live longer and wounds heal faster and more thoroughly than in normal mice. This confocal microscopy image from a mouse lacking the Sept2/ARTS gene shows a tail wound in the process of healing. See more information in the press release from Rockefeller University (http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2013/06/20/scientists-identify-gene-that-regulates-stem-cell-death-and-skin-regeneration/) and the article in Science (http://www.sciencemag.org/content/341/6143/286.abstract).<br<</br>Related to images 3497 and 3500.9/9/2020 3:30:22 AM9/9/2020 3:30:22 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Steller22    High 220 KB 6/3/2016 3:30 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C br<</br>Related to images 3497 and 3500 STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{6130A2D6-BDAC-4210-BFD6-D3D1767A3A40}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
349915229Wound healing requires the action of stem cells. In mice that lack the Sept2/ARTS gene, stem cells involved in wound healing live longer and wounds heal faster and more thoroughly than in normal mice. This confocal microscopy image from a mouse lacking the Sept2/ARTS gene shows a tail wound in the process of healing. Cell nuclei are in blue. Red and orange mark hair follicle stem cells (hair follicle stem cells activate to cause hair regrowth, which indicates healing). See more information in the press release from Rockefeller University (http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2013/06/20/scientists-identify-gene-that-regulates-stem-cell-death-and-skin-regeneration/) and the article in Science (http://www.sciencemag.org/content/341/6143/286.abstract).9/9/2020 3:32:17 AM9/9/2020 3:32:17 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Steller3    Other 2867 KB 9/26/2020 10:42 PM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C This confocal microscopy image from a mouse lacking the Sept2/ARTS STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{0E9BF67F-CA2D-44C1-B651-1E6225E274E3}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
350015230Wound healing requires the action of stem cells. In mice that lack the Sept2/ARTS gene, stem cells involved in wound healing live longer and wounds heal faster and more thoroughly than in normal mice. This confocal microscopy image from a mouse lacking the Sept2/ARTS gene shows a tail wound in the process of healing. See more information in the press release from Rockefeller University <a href="http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2013/06/20/scientists-identify-gene-that-regulates-stem-cell-death-and-skin-regeneration/">(http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2013/06/20/scientists-identify-gene-that-regulates-stem-cell-death-and-skin-regeneration/)</a> and the article in Science <a href="http://www.sciencemag.org/content/341/6143/286.abstract/"> (http://www.sciencemag.org/content/341/6143/286.abstract)</a>.<br<</br>Related to images 3497 and 3498.9/10/2020 3:29:16 PM9/10/2020 3:29:16 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Steller4    Other 884 KB 9/26/2020 10:43 PM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C In mice that lack the Sept2/ARTS STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{796B0EB8-8631-4FAD-9881-4789DF4C19D1}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
350915231In this image, recombinant probes known as FingRs (Fibronectin Intrabodies Generated by mRNA display) were expressed in a cortical neuron, where they attached fluorescent proteins to either PSD95 (green) or Gephyrin (red). PSD-95 is a marker for synaptic strength at excitatory postsynaptic sites, and Gephyrin plays a similar role at inhibitory postsynaptic sites. Thus, using FingRs it is possible to obtain a map of synaptic connections onto a particular neuron in a living cell in real time. <br> Funding: R01GM-083898 <br> Principle Investigators: Don B. Arnold http://dornsife.usc.edu/arnold Richard W. Roberts http://chems.usc.edu/faculty_staff/roberts.htm9/27/2020 2:59:55 AM9/27/2020 2:59:55 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 3509_Arnold_S    Low 114 KB 3/28/2019 4:18 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{47391728-3CD5-47FA-837E-8B05A1464725}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
351815232Scanning electron micrograph of just-divided HeLa cells. Zeiss Merlin HR-SEM. See related images 3519,3520,3521,3522.9/27/2020 3:27:26 AM9/27/2020 3:27:26 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified HeLaV_L    Low 119 KB 6/3/2016 3:30 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C National Center for Microscopy and Imaging STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{DF35293D-4426-449F-97F4-E899122B7824}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
351915233Scanning electron micrograph of an apoptotic HeLa cell. Zeiss Merlin HR-SEM. See related images 3518,3520,3521,3522.9/27/2020 3:30:19 AM9/27/2020 3:30:19 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified HeLa_cells_4_L    Low 169 KB 6/3/2016 3:30 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{9EF6239E-C742-4B49-95BC-0FA0AD4A43B6}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
352015234Multiphoton fluorescence image of HeLa cells with cytoskeletal microtubules (magenta) and DNA (cyan). Nikon RTS2000MP custom laser scanning microscope. See related images 3518,3519,3521,3522.9/27/2020 3:31:22 AM9/27/2020 3:31:22 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified HeLa_cells_3_L    Low 235 KB 6/3/2016 3:30 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{A4126921-9441-48BB-8C06-DF820C7925D4}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
352115235Multiphoton fluorescence image of HeLa cells stained with the actin binding toxin phalloidin (red), microtubules (cyan) and cell nuclei (blue). Nikon RTS2000MP custom laser scanning microscope. See related images 3518,3519,3520,3522.9/27/2020 3:39:33 AM9/27/2020 3:39:33 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified HeLa_cells_2_L    Low 134 KB 6/3/2016 3:30 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{23E73D20-7634-4D67-8AE3-852B4FDFDFA8}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
253615236The G switch allows our bodies to respond rapidly to hormones. See images 2537 and 2538 for labeled versions of this image. Featured in <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/medbydesign/ target="_blank"><i>Medicines By Design</i></a>.10/9/2020 4:47:14 PM10/9/2020 4:47:14 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified The_G_Switch_S    Low 42 KB 8/24/2016 3:09 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{D9496E31-4B5E-4424-B18C-CBE535D4C526}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
253715237The G switch allows our bodies to respond rapidly to hormones. G proteins act like relay batons to pass messages from circulating hormones into cells. A hormone (red) encounters a receptor (blue) in the membrane of a cell. Next, a G protein (green) becomes activated and makes contact with the receptor to which the hormone is attached. Finally, the G protein passes the hormone's message to the cell by switching on a cell enzyme (purple) that triggers a response. See image 2536 and 2538 for other versions of this image. Featured in <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/medbydesign/ target="_blank"><i>Medicines By Design</i></a>.10/9/2020 4:46:41 PM10/9/2020 4:46:41 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified The_G_Switch_S    Low 50 KB 8/24/2016 3:06 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C See image 2536 and 2538 for STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{24697F49-DC4B-4FD7-BE6B-757DE3616E6B}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
253815238The G switch allows our bodies to respond rapidly to hormones. G proteins act like relay batons to pass messages from circulating hormones into cells. A hormone (red) encounters a receptor (blue) in the membrane of a cell. Next, a G protein (green) becomes activated and makes contact with the receptor to which the hormone is attached. Finally, the G protein passes the hormone's message to the cell by switching on a cell enzyme (purple) that triggers a response. See image 2536 and 2537 for other versions of this image. Featured in <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/medbydesign/ target="_blank"><i>Medicines By Design</i></a>.10/9/2020 4:47:53 PM10/9/2020 4:47:53 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified The_G_Switch_with_labels_and_stages_S    Low 50 KB 8/24/2016 3:04 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{428A86B8-FDBB-4501-8B96-7B52927985DA}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
354615245A large number of proteins interact with the hormone insulin as it is produced in and scereted from the beta cells of the pancreas. In this image, the interactions of TMEM24 protein (green) and insulin (red) in pancreatic beta cells are shown in yellow. More information about the research behind this image can be found in a <a href="http://biobeat.nigms.nih.gov/2013/11/mapping-approach-yields-insulin-secretion-pathway-insights/">Biomedical Beat Blog</a> posting from November 2013.2/11/2021 9:04:20 PM2/11/2021 9:04:20 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 3546_balch_TMEM24_S    Low 88 KB 3/11/2019 5:03 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{C2A658FA-DAAB-4CB0-B4B9-89DEAB60D3B8}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
354715246An image of the area of the mouse brain that serves as the 'master clock,' which houses the brain's time-keeping neurons. The nuclei of the clock cells are shown in blue. A small molecule called VIP, shown in green, enables neurons in the central clock in the mammalian brain to synchronize. More information about the research behind this image can be found in a <a href="http://biobeat.nigms.nih.gov/">Biomedical Beat Blog</a> posting from November 2013.9/27/2020 4:57:16 AM9/27/2020 4:57:16 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified VIP_protein_color_M    Medium 98 KB 6/3/2016 3:31 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C I?ll forward her note for your STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{A9C06EAD-A1B6-4BCB-A865-C886100DF8C1}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
354915247The green in this image highlights a protein called TonB, which is produced by many gram-negative bacteria, including those that cause typhoid fever, meningitis and dysentery. TonB lets bacteria take up iron from the host's body, which they need to survive. More information about the research behind this image can be found in a <a href="http://biobeat.nigms.nih.gov/2013/08/cool-image-tiny-bacterial-motor/">Biomedical Beat Blog posting</a> from August 2013.9/27/2020 5:01:16 AM9/27/2020 5:01:16 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified tonb_klebba_L    Low 3 KB 6/3/2016 3:31 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Beat Blog posting</a> from August 2013 STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{64FA3C50-EBC9-4930-B1C5-3401B94D1191}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
355015248The green spots in this image are clumps of protein inside yeast cells that are deficient in both zinc and a protein called Tsa1 that prevents clumping. Protein clumping plays a role in many diseases, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's, where proteins clump together in the brain. Zinc deficiency within a cell can cause proteins to mis-fold and eventually clump together. Normally, in yeast, Tsa1 codes for so-called "chaperone proteins" which help proteins in stressed cells, such as those with a zinc deficiency, fold correctly. The <a href="http://www.jbc.org/content/early/2013/09/10/jbc.M113.512384.abstract">research behind this image </a> was published in 2013 in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.1/15/2021 5:09:01 PM1/15/2021 5:09:01 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Eide-zinc    Other 9572 KB 9/27/2020 1:09 AM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C The green spots in this image are STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{4E032525-5B45-4148-8875-AA3FF8461ABB}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
355615249Luciferase-based imaging enables visualization and quantification of internal organs and transplanted cells in live adult zebrafish. In this image, a cardiac muscle-restricted promoter drives firefly luciferase expression. Lateral (Top) and overhead views (Bottom) are shown.10/5/2020 5:20:22 AM10/5/2020 5:20:22 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Poss-zebrafish-01    High 416 KB 6/3/2016 3:31 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C br>For imagery of the overhead STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{3D1F01B8-728A-4F3D-B381-CF2B50DEAA2C}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
355715250Luciferase-based imaging enables visualization and quantification of internal organs and transplanted cells in live adult zebrafish. In this image, a cardiac muscle-restricted promoter drives firefly luciferase expression (overhead view).10/5/2020 5:19:11 AM10/5/2020 5:19:11 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Poss-zebrafish-02_L    Low 20 KB 6/3/2016 3:31 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C br>For imagery of both the STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{E71A3B27-F195-440D-B17B-B07940F5C51C}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
355815251Luciferase-based imaging enables visualization and quantification of internal organs and transplanted cells in live adult zebrafish. In this image, a cardiac muscle-restricted promoter drives firefly luciferase expression (lateral view).10/5/2020 5:23:30 AM10/5/2020 5:23:30 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Poss-zebrafish-03_M    Medium 104 KB 6/3/2016 3:31 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C br>For imagery of both the STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{609B0D19-64A4-46CE-8F68-348417AC7AFA}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
358315260This video condenses 6.5 minutes into less than a minute to show how the toxin in bee venom, called melittin, destroys an animal or bacterial cell. What looks like a red balloon is an artificial cell filled with red dye. Melittin molecules are colored green and float on the cell's surface like twigs on a pond. As melittin accumulates on the cell's membrane, the membrane expands to accommodate it. In the video, the membrane stretches into a column on the left. When melittin levels reach a critical threshold, countless pinhole leaks burst open in the membrane. The cell's vital fluids (red dye in the video) leak out through these pores. Within minutes, the cell collapses. More information about the research behind this image can be found in a <a href="http://biobeat.nigms.nih.gov/2013/09/cool-video-how-bee-venom-toxin-kills-cells/" target=_blank>Biomedical Beat Blog posting</a> from September 2013.10/5/2020 3:02:48 PM10/5/2020 3:02:48 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 3583_Bee_venom_toxin_destroying_a_cell_T    Thumbnail 93 KB 3/28/2019 4:10 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{DE9F9AD2-E71C-49E9-BCAE-696812BEA13C}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
358615263Relapsing fever is caused by a bacterium and transmitted by certain soft-bodied ticks or body lice. The disease is seldom fatal in humans, but it can be very serious and prolonged. This scanning electron micrograph shows Borrelia hermsii (green), one of the bacterial species that causes the disease, interacting with red blood cells. Micrograph by Robert Fischer, NIAID. Related to <a href="https://imagesadminprod.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3585">image 3585</a>. <Br></Br>For more information about relapsing fever, see <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/relapsing-fever/index.html">https://www.cdc.gov/relapsing-fever/index.html</a>. <Br></Br> This image is part of the Life: Magnified collection, which was displayed in the Gateway Gallery at Washington Dulles International Airport June 3, 2014, to January 21, 2015. To see all 46 images in this exhibit, go to <a href="https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/life-magnified/Pages/default.aspx">https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/life-magnified/Pages/default.aspx</a>10/19/2020 5:43:06 AM10/19/2020 5:43:06 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Relapsing_fever_rbc-hermsii-sem_M    Medium 894 KB 6/3/2016 3:33 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{C5947FC0-AF26-4C5E-8046-E19E179937DF}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
359015265Developing spermatids (precursors of mature sperm cells) begin as small, round cells and mature into long-tailed, tadpole-shaped ones. In the sperm cell's head is the cell nucleus; in its tail is the power to outswim thousands of competitors to fertilize an egg. As seen in this microscopy image, fruit fly spermatids start out as bouquets of interconnected cells. A small lipid molecule called PIP2 helps spermatids tell their heads from their tails. Here, PIP2 (red) marks the nuclei and a cell skeleton-building protein called tubulin (green) marks the tails. When PIP2 levels are too low, some spermatids get mixed up and grow with their heads at the wrong end. Because sperm development is similar across species, studies in fruit flies could help researchers understand male infertility in humans.10/19/2020 5:47:39 AM10/19/2020 5:47:39 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Fabian_et_al-cover_pic_1-RGB2    Other 10234 KB 10/19/2020 1:52 AM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{1E653F9B-A3DB-4BB0-AC1F-1A9089E37998}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
359215266Watch a cell ripple toward a beam of light that turns on a movement-related protein.10/19/2020 6:08:59 AM10/19/2020 6:08:59 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 3592_Math_from_the_heart_T    Thumbnail 63 KB 3/28/2019 4:09 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{08777930-8779-4B3C-9C3F-1EC6276A9CE5}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
359315267The feeding tube, or pharynx, of a planarian worm with cilia shown in red and muscle fibers shown in green10/19/2020 6:12:17 AM10/19/2020 6:12:17 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 3593_Isolated_Planarian_S    Low 110 KB 3/28/2019 4:09 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{F9C51F8D-4481-41A5-9BB0-B389BC724927}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
257815275A protein called tubulin (green) accumulates in the center of a nucleus (outlined in pink) from an aging cell. Normally, this protein is kept out of the nucleus with the help of gatekeepers known as nuclear pore complexes. But NIGMS-funded researchers found that wear and tear to long-lived components of the complexes eventually lowers the gatekeepers' guard. As a result, cytoplasmic proteins like tubulin gain entry to the nucleus while proteins normally confined to the nucleus seep out. The work suggests that finding ways to stop the leakage could slow the cellular aging process and possibly lead to new therapies for age-related diseases. Featured in the February 18, 2009, issue of <a href=http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/biobeat/09-02-18/index.html#1 target="_blank"><i>Biomedical Beat</i></a>.10/30/2020 4:29:42 PM10/30/2020 4:29:42 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Cellular_Aging2_S    Low 78 KB 9/7/2016 2:51 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{E1B32569-734D-4878-BFBF-EB65558BC077}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
360615276In plants, as in animals, stem cells can transform into a variety of different cell types. The stem cells at the growing tip of this Arabidopsis plant will soon become flowers. Arabidopsis is frequently studied by cellular and molecular biologists because it grows rapidly (its entire life cycle is only 6 weeks), produces lots of seeds and has a genome that is easy to manipulate. This image is part of the Life: Magnified collection, which was displayed in the Gateway Gallery at Washington Dulles International Airport June 3, 2014, to January 21, 2015. To see all 46 images in this exhibit, go to https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/life-magnified/Pages/default.aspx.10/25/2020 11:39:41 PM10/25/2020 11:39:41 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 5_topmid_Flower_cell_plant    Other 3073 KB 10/25/2020 7:49 PM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{69D49AC0-B619-4A4C-A1D9-072FB68B5234}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
360715277A fruit fly ovary, shown here, contains as many as 20 eggs. Fruit flies are not merely tiny insects that buzz around overripe fruit--they are a venerable scientific tool. Research on the flies has shed light on many aspects of human biology, including biological rhythms, learning, memory and neurodegenerative diseases. Another reason fruit flies are so useful in a lab (and so successful in fruit bowls) is that they reproduce rapidly. About three generations can be studied in a single month. <Br><Br>Related to image <a href="http://images.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3656" target=_blank>3656</a>. This image is part of the Life: Magnified collection, which was displayed in the Gateway Gallery at Washington Dulles International Airport June 3, 2014, to January 21, 2015. To see all 46 images in this exhibit, go to https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/life-magnified/Pages/default.aspx.10/26/2020 12:48:49 AM10/26/2020 12:48:49 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 4_Montell.Blue_Ovary_M    Medium 613 KB 7/27/2016 11:27 AM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{AF7AA717-E49F-4A98-9A4A-36CF9410C900}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
360915278Those of us who get sneezy and itchy-eyed every spring or fall may have pollen grains, like those shown here, to blame. Pollen grains are the male germ cells of plants, released to fertilize the corresponding female plant parts. When they are instead inhaled into human nasal passages, they can trigger allergies. This image is part of the Life: Magnified collection, which was displayed in the Gateway Gallery at Washington Dulles International Airport June 3, 2014, to January 21, 2015. To see all 46 images in this exhibit, go to https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/life-magnified/Pages/default.aspx.10/26/2020 12:56:18 AM10/26/2020 12:56:18 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 6_2_pollen-grains-yellow    Other 56981 KB 10/25/2020 8:58 PM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{509580B6-CE4A-4AED-8738-B548E6B15C0F}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
361015279Hepatocytes, like the one shown here, are the most abundant type of cell in the human liver. They play an important role in building proteins; producing bile, a liquid that aids in digesting fats; and chemically processing molecules found normally in the body, like hormones, as well as foreign substances like medicines and alcohol. This image is part of the Life: Magnified collection, which was displayed in the Gateway Gallery at Washington Dulles International Airport June 3, 2014, to January 21, 2015. To see all 46 images in this exhibit, go to https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/life-magnified/Pages/default.aspx.10/26/2020 1:02:27 AM10/26/2020 1:02:27 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 1B3_Human_Hepatocyte    Other 56982 KB 10/25/2020 9:03 PM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{E8A0C735-1B3F-4C42-A3DE-E53B2F6C67D6}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
361115280Just as our bodies rely on bones for structural support, our cells rely on a cellular skeleton. In addition to helping cells keep their shape, this cytoskeleton transports material within cells and coordinates cell division. One component of the cytoskeleton is a protein called tubulin, shown here as thin strands. This image is part of the Life: Magnified collection, which was displayed in the Gateway Gallery at Washington Dulles International Airport June 3, 2014, to January 21, 2015. To see all 46 images in this exhibit, go to https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/life-magnified/Pages/default.aspx.10/26/2020 1:07:00 AM10/26/2020 1:07:00 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 7_bottomright_Tiny_strands_of_tubulin_proteins    Other 62102 KB 10/25/2020 9:08 PM Harris, Donald (NIH STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{DD730B29-0657-448A-BFF9-09B2B0A19F10}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
361215281Multiple anthrax bacteria (green) being enveloped by an immune system cell (purple). Anthrax bacteria live in soil and form dormant spores that can survive for decades. When animals eat or inhale these spores, the bacteria activate and rapidly increase in number. Today, a highly effective and widely used vaccine has made the disease uncommon in domesticated animals and rare in humans. This image is part of the Life: Magnified collection, which was displayed in the Gateway Gallery at Washington Dulles International Airport June 3, 2014, to January 21, 2015. To see all 46 images in this exhibit, go to https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/life-magnified/Pages/default.aspx.10/26/2020 1:12:48 AM10/26/2020 1:12:48 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 9_1_Anthrax_and_immune_cell    Other 63559 KB 10/25/2020 9:16 PM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{8B93F520-2902-4EB6-AB80-67DF9FAFE76B}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
348815290Shiga toxin (green) is sorted from the endosome into membrane tubules (red), which then pinch off and move to the Golgi apparatus.9/8/2020 11:05:30 PM9/8/2020 11:05:30 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Manganese    Other 94 KB 9/26/2020 10:23 PM Harris, Donald (NIH/NIGMS) [C We would like to add the image STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{05966EB7-4653-4C31-8BCB-559E2C254C44}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
348915291To develop a system for studying cell motility in unnatrual conditions -- a microscope slide instead of the body -- Tom Roberts and Katsuya Shimabukuro at Florida State University disassembled and reconstituted the motility parts used by worm sperm cells.9/8/2020 11:09:41 PM9/8/2020 11:09:41 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Roberts_cool_image_M    Medium 11 KB 6/3/2016 3:30 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C We would like to add the STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{56D4D731-F837-44AD-BCAE-9A46C68B1083}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
349015292On top, the brain of a sleep-deprived fly glows orange because of Bruchpilot, a communication protein between brain cells. These bright orange brain areas are associated with learning. On the bottom, a well-rested fly shows lower levels of Bruchpilot, which might make the fly ready to learn after a good night's rest.9/8/2020 11:16:35 PM9/8/2020 11:16:35 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified 3490_coolimagecirelli_S    Low 203 KB 3/28/2019 4:29 PM Constantinides, Stephen (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{2D0B0671-BBE2-4FE5-AC8F-0F260E2BEC01}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
349115293A protein called kinesin (blue) is in charge of moving cargo around inside cells and helping them divide. It's powered by biological fuel called ATP (bright yellow) as it scoots along tube-like cellular tracks called microtubules (gray).9/8/2020 11:21:32 PM9/8/2020 11:21:32 PMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified cool_image_kinesin_L    Low 7 KB 6/3/2016 3:30 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C Would you allow us to do so, and would you please let us know how you would like to STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{35B500A0-F314-4453-AED7-2C9A600F10D9}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
349215294This tropical scene, reminiscent of a postcard from Key West, is actually a petri dish containing an artistic arrangement of genetically engineered bacteria. The image showcases eight of the fluorescent proteins created in the laboratory of the late Roger Y. Tsien, a cell biologist at the University of California, San Diego. Tsien, along with Osamu Shimomura of the Marine Biology Laboratory and Martin Chalfie of Columbia University, share the 2008 Nobel Prize in chemistry for their work on green fluorescent protein-a naturally glowing molecule from jellyfish that has become a powerful tool for studying molecules inside living cells.9/9/2020 1:51:26 AM9/9/2020 1:51:26 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified cool_image_colored_proteins1_M    Medium 103 KB 8/30/2016 12:30 PM Varkala, Venkat (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{82113CDA-7154-491B-8100-C43A4925AAC1}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
349415296Thin, hair-like biological structures called cilia are tiny but mighty. Each one, made up of more than 600 different proteins, works together with hundreds of others in a tightly-packed layer to move like a crowd at a ball game doing "the wave." Their synchronized motion helps sweep mucus from the lungs and usher eggs from the ovaries into the uterus. By controlling how fluid flows around an embryo, cilia also help ensure that organs like the heart develop on the correct side of your body.9/9/2020 2:26:22 AM9/9/2020 2:26:22 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Dogic_video_thumbnail    Thumbnail 21 KB 6/3/2016 3:30 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{E29A22FD-3A58-4C1D-B4A9-0A6398F18B74}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131
349715297Wound healing requires the action of stem cells. In mice that lack the Sept2/ARTS gene, stem cells involved in wound healing live longer and wounds heal faster and more thoroughly than in normal mice. This confocal microscopy image from a mouse lacking the Sept2/ARTS gene shows a tail wound in the process of healing. See more information in the press release from Rockefeller University (http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2013/06/20/scientists-identify-gene-that-regulates-stem-cell-death-and-skin-regeneration/) and the article in Science (http://www.sciencemag.org/content/341/6143/286.abstract).<br<</br>Related to images 3498 and 3500.9/9/2020 2:55:38 AM9/9/2020 2:55:38 AMType    Name    Media Type    File Size    Modified Steller1    High 505 KB 6/3/2016 3:30 PM aamishral2 (NIH/NIGMS) [C br<</br>Related to images 3498 and 3500 STS_ListItem_DocumentLibraryhttps://images.nigms.nih.gov/PublicAssets/Forms/AllItems.aspx0https://images.nigms.nih.govhtmlTruehttps://images.nigms.nih.gov{C569D568-2C7B-41A2-A222-B70E85E15374}Sharepoint.DocumentSet~sitecollection/_catalogs/masterpage/Display Templates/Search/Item_PublicAsset.js3131